(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Maryland"



LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




MARYLAND & R A RE BOOK ROOM 
UNIVERSITY Or MARYLAND L IBRAR Y 
COLLEGE PARK, Ma ^«ARY 



DO NOT WttfTl 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/maryland24univ 



4tch 



'IK.* 




For Modern Plumbing & Heating 

We offer the finest quality in wholesale 

PLUMBING & HEATING SUPPLIES 
PIPE • VALVES . FITTINGS 

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIFICATIONS 
AVAILABLE FOR ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS 




Visit Our Complete, Modern 
PLUMBING and HEATING SHOWROOM 

1206 K Street, N.W., • Washington, D. C. 



WAREHOUSES 

4th & Channing Sts., N.E. 
1 206-8 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



NEW BRANCH 

8216 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring 
Maryland 



BRANCH 

1 680 Clough Street 

Baltimore 

Maryland 



R. D. Watson, President— Class 1917 



JAMES A. MI<:*Si:it COMPANY 



Vol. XXIV November-December 1952 No. 1 



M 



ARYLAND 

PUBLICATION OF THE 
MARYLAND 



UNIVERSITY 
ALUM 



N I 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, 
and entered at the Post Office. College Park, Md.. as 
second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of 
March 3, 1879. S3. 00 per year Fifty cents the copy. 

HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN. Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

Talbot T. Speer '17, President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12. Vice-President 
Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 

Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer 

Remsberg '18, Dr. Howard L. Stier '31, Lee W. 

Adkins '42 (alternate). 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Frederick S. DeMarr '49, Lov 

M. Shipp. Jr., '43. William H. Press '28. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Egbert F. Tingley '27, Talbot T. Speer '17, N. S. 

Sinclair '43. 
EDUCATION— Mrs. Florence Duke '50. Miss Joan 

Mattinglv '51, Donald Malev '50. 
ENGINEERING — Col. O. H. Saunders '10, S. 

Chester Ward '32. C. V. Koons '29. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26, 

Miss Ruth McRae '27, Mrs. Hilda Jones Nystrom. 
DENTAL— Thomas J. Bland, Jr., '17, Arthur I. 

Bell '19, C. Clifton Coward '23. 
MEDICAL— Thurston R. Adams '34. John A. Wag- 
ner '38, William H. Triplett '11. 
LAW — John G. Turnbull '32, John G. Prendergast 

'3i. G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Mrs. Eva Farley '27, 

June E. Geiser '47. 
PHARMACY— Francis P. Balassone '25, Morris 

Cooper '26, Joseph Cohen '29. 

Clubs 

BALTIMORE CLUB— Dr. Albert E. GolJstein '12. 

NEW YORK CLUB— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 

CUMBERLAND CLUB— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 

PITTSBURGH CLUB— Herbert O. Eby '32. 

"M" CLUB— Joseph H. Deckman '31. 

EX-OFFICIO— Dr. H. C. Byrd '08, President, Uni- 
versity of Maryland; David L. Brigham, '38, Exec. 
Sect'y., Alumni Association. 





"Baltimore's 
Favorite Dessert" 

PEabody 2600 
2318 Belair Rd. Baltimore 13 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Specialties 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. Howard Street 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



POOR, BOWEM, BARTLETT 
& KENNEDY, INC. 



POLICY ANALYSIS 

ENGINEERING SURVEYS 

APPRAISALS 



INSURANCE & BONDING 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY 



Phone: LExington 6004 



26 SOUTH CALVERT STREET 



BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND 



College Students . . . 

Select your "COURSES" from our 
"BOARD OF EDUCATION" 

The Pierre "BOARD" caters to educated 

palates with course after course of 

delicious dishes prepared by professors 
of the culinary art. 



LUNCH 



COCKTAILS 



DINNER 



''All I 

*?,- Restaurant Pierre 

Maryland's only, truly Continental Cuisine 
704 N. HOWARD ST., BALTIMORE 
=- Si Closed Tues. Call Pierre for Reservations, LEx. 3506 

l$067fc 




Crecteb ®o TOje (Slorp 0i TOje lorb 





Gov. McKeldin 



A House of Prayer for All People, University of 
Maryland's New Chapel Is Dedicated. Governor 

McKeldin, Speaker. 

By Jay Jackson 

/^THK University of Maryland Memorial Chapel, referred to by Presi- 
^ J> dent H. C. Byrd as "a house of prayer for all," and erected in 
^ honor of University alumni and faculty who. in uniform, gave their 
lives for the principles and ideals of their country, was dedicated with 
appropriate ceremonies on October 12, 1952. 

"What distinguishes democracy from the de- 
based caricatures of free government prevalent in 
some other countries," said Maryland's Governor, 
Theodore R. McKeldin, in his dedicatory address, 
"is that in a democracy the entire procedure is 
inspired and motivated by ethical standards which 
are rooted in religion. 

"We know", the Governor continued, "that the 
essence of democracy is not the ballot box. That 
is indeed a necessary tool, but it can become an 
empty form as we have seen in Nazi Germany and 
Communist Russia, whose systems differ, one from 
the other, only superficially. 

"I am deeply convinced that the aloofness of 
our worthy religious leaders from the political 
arena is a great mistake," Governor McKeldin 
declared. 

Should Serve Ideals 

"Of course", he continued, "the minister should not go into politics 
for partisan advantage or to obtain special benefits for himself or his 
church. That would diminish, if not destroy, his usefulness to the 
ideals he should aim to serve." 

"Crime, disease, poverty and human suffering, whether caused by 
natural disaster, personal misfortune or ignorance, or by human ex- 
ploitation, discrimination or injustice, be it economic, social or sec- 
tarian — these are all concerns to which religion cannot remain indif- 
ferent," the Governor went on to say. 

"The church must not merely condemn sin in general; it must iden- 
tify it and expose it in any phase of our community life". Governor 
McKeldin added. 

In discussing the missions of statecraft and religion in 
international peace, the Governor stressed that national 
lohcy should be based upon those principles and values 
in human relations which are taught by religion. 

Judge William P. Cole Jr., Chairman of the University's 
Board of Regents, dedicated the chapel to the Univers- 
ity's students, alumni, faculty, the people of Maryland and 
of the United States. 

"Acting in my capacity as 
Chairman of the Board of Re- 
gents of the University," said 
Judge Cole in dedicatory re- 
marks, "the Board responsible 
for the policies of this Univers- 
ity, I now dedicate this building, 
hereafter to be known as the 
University of Maryland Mem- 
orial Chapel, to the use of the 
Student Body of the University, 
to the Faculty, to the Alumni, 
and to the people of Maryland, 
and of the United States. I dedi- 
cate this building for the worship 
of God, to the glory of God, for 
the spiritual welfare of those who 
worship here, and to the service, 
in the name of God, of all man- 
kind." 

Addressing the Students, Judge 
Cole continued: "I dedicate this 
building for their teaching and 
(Continued on page 23) 




Heat W&t Jforget 

77(r tumult and the shouting dies; 
The captains and the kings depart; 
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice, 
An humble and a contrite heart. 
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 
Lest we forget — lest ur forget. 

—"Recessional" — Rudyard Kipling. 1897 

RUE to the traditions and standards of patriotism and valor established by Washington's "Old Liners" and 

maintained by men of Maryland from '76 to Heartbreak Ridge — and beyond — those listed below made the 

supreme sacrifice while serving in our country's uniforms. The University's new Memorial Chapel is dedicated 

to them. This list is incomplete. Later Korea heroes are to be added to the memorial plaque to be installed 

in the Chapel. 



1 



Adalman, Mrrvin S. 
Aitcheson, Robert D. 
Alexander, Hugh R. 
Alexander, Richard K. 
Allen, Harry S. 
Amass, Jack Robert 
Arminger, John 
Athey, Milton W. 
Axtell, Harold A., Jr. 
Bagby, William W. 
Baldwin, John S. 
Bauerm an , W M . M . 
Baxley, Joshua W., Jr. 
Beall,W.R. 
Beardsley, Thomas 
Bell, Harry L. 
Bell, James Russell 
Bennett, John H. 
Bierer, Donald S. 
Birn bau m , A . W m . 
Blake, David G. 
Bonnett, Warren L. 
Booth, Robert S.. Jr. 
Bowman, Maurice Irvin 
Bradley, Robert Bell 
Branch, Hugh W. 
Brown, James W. 
Buddington, Philip N. ~~ 
Buhl, Victor C, Jr. 
Bunker, Franklin P. 
Burger, William S. 
Burrall, Jesse 
Butler, Harry M. 
Carter, John M. 
Carter, Lewis T. 
Castle, Noel O. 
Chiswell, Lawrence R. 
Chronister, Mason 
Cline, Carl A., Jr. 
Coblentz, Ernest 
Cole, William P., Ill 
Collins, Hiram H. 
Con lon, John F. 
Cooke, Charles H. 
Cooke, Leroy Moore 
Coonan, Thomas J. 
Cranford, Leonard C. 
Crawford, William K. 
Curtin, John F. 



Daly, John Joseph 
Davis, Bruce W. 
Dick, Paul, Jr. 
Dorn,R. L. 
Dorsey, N. G., Jr. 
Drysdale, W. B. 
Duke, James P. 
Dulin,T.R 
Dullea, Joseph 
Dunn, James E. 
Edwards, R. H. 
Edyvean, J. H. 
Feindt, William B. 
Fine, Joseph J. 
Fisher, Ralph C. 
Fissel, John E., Jr. 
Fitzwater, Earl Wayne 
Flood, Jerome 
Forsythe, John R. 
Foss.K.E. 
Frank, W.M. 
Friedberg, Herbert 
Fugitt, Donald T. 
Gales, Richard E. 
Gatch, Benton R., Jr. 
Gentile, Don S. 
Gillett, Thornton R 
Goldberg, Albert 
Goldman, Daniel W. 
Gordon, William 
Gorsuch, Gilbert F. 
Guckeyson, John W. 
Guerrant, Morris P. 
Hall, Thos. A. 
Hamilton, Bon faey 
Hambleton, J. Aldrich 
Hatfield, Robert V. 
Hayes, Frederick S. 
Hetico, Wm. J. 
Hodson,A.E.,III 
Hoffecker, Frank S.. Jr. 
Hollister, Louise M. 
Holton, Wm. 
Hunt, Max J. 
Hunteman.C. F. 
Hurley, George M. 
Insley, RobertS. 
Jannerone, Lewis H. 
Jenkins, William A. 
Jones, Fletcher H.. Jr. 
Jones, Kenneth F. 
Jones, Oliver S., Jr. 



Jones, Stephen H. 
Jordon, John A. 
Kamber, Bertram 
Kelly, C. Markland, Jr. 
Ken non, Wyatt S. 
Kieffer, George D. 
Kirby, William W., Jr. 
Krehnbrink, William H. 
LaPorte, Robert W. 
Lehman, Paul E. 
Lehmann, Theodore S. 
Leites, Israel L. 
Leppert, Norman E. 
Lichliter, Lawrence D. 
Lines, W. F. 
Lloyd, Edward M. 
Loomis, Malcolm L. 
Low man, Morris S. 
MacKenzie. Lawrence 
Magness, John Newton 
Magruder, John R. 
Mann, Stanley 
Marzolf, John C. 
McCaffrey', Richard H. 
McCool, John H. 
McKee, Robert C. 
McKinstry _ ,V. L, 
McNeil, John R. 
Mears, Frank D. 
Meeks, George 
Messinger, Reid 
Milburn, Harry E. 
Miller, George E. 
Miller, Luther B. 
Moore, Charles Davis 
Mowatt, Frank G. ' — 
Nardo, Anthony C. 
Newgarden. Paul W. 
Nixon, Robert L., Jr. 
Xorkis, James M. 
O'Farrell, Rufas 
Owings, Ralph D. 
Patterson. James W. 
Peak, Frank L., Jr. 
Pearce. William H. 
Petersen, Carl D. 
Phillips, Robert 
Pitts, Robert A. 
Porter, Robert C. 
Ports, Kenneth L. 
Powell, George 
Prescott, John 




Prevost, Theodore 
Pyles, George V. 
Prinz,J.W.,Jr. 
Randall, J. H. 
Reckord, John G. 
Redinger, Frank 
Reilly, W. J. 
Riggin, George M. 
Robertson, Samuel T., Jr. 
Roesler, Herbert S. 
Rosen field, Norman P. 
Ruben, William M. 
Rubin, Jesse Jay' 
Sabatino, Bernard J. 
Sacks, Jerome G. 
Schack, William Robert 
Schmitt, Edwin M. 
Schnebly, R. Andrew 
Searls, Edwin M. 
Sesso, George A. 
Shaw. Joseph M. 
Shepherd, Walter 
Sheridan, David L. 
Simpson, John G. 
Sirlouis, James R„ Jr. 
Sisson,Hugh J. 
Smith, Robert H. 
Smith, Talbert A. 
Springer, Earl V. 
Steele, Justus U. 
Suit, William Jack 
Timmerman, F. P.. Jr. 
Tittsler, Robert W. 
Treadway, Bernard 
Trojakowski, Wadsworth C. 
Tryon.R. G. 
Tschantre, John A. 
Valenti, Gino 
Valliant, John 
Voris, John B. 
Walter, Julian F., Jr. 
Warren, W.J. 
Weigand, Philip E. 
White, Herbert J. — 
Wieland, John T. 
Whitman, Julian 
Wehr, Everett 
Williams, Paul Melvin 
Willis, Robert B. 
Woodward, Albert D. 
York, Warren, Jr. 
Ziegele, Robert R. 
Zulick, Charles M. 



[3] 



ZduaatiaH, 




- hoi been itneAAed Lu 




Adm. Nimitz 



UPON the cessation of hostilities termi- 
nating World War II. Admiral Chester 
W. Nimitz, U.S.N. , commanding our vic- 
torious naval forces, summed up with, "The 
most effective weapon 
we imposed upon the 
enemv was EDUCA- 
TION!" 

The Government of 
the United States is 
one which has, from 
Colonial days to date, 
encouraged its citizens 
to reach for the higher 
development of mind, 
body and soul, and to 
contribute by the re- 
sultant fullness of their 
lives to an enriched 
American Civilization. 
Accentuating the value of education by 
constant study. General Clifton B. Cates, 
US. Marine Corps, said in an address at 
the University of Maryland, 

"There is no place in 
the world for a closed 
mind or one that has 
stopped growing. Edu- 
cation is a lifetime 
proposition. When a 
man stops learning, he 
stops living. There re- 
mains only the formal- 
ity of burying him." 

Designating the 
school as "the greatest 
discovery ever made 
by man," and empha- 




Gen. Cates 



sizing the nation's duty toward education 
of its youth, Horace Mann (1796-1859), 
famed educator, Congressman, and chair- 
man of America's first Board of Education, 
wrote, 

"Remember that whatever station in life 
you may fill, these mortals — these immor- 
tals — are your care. Devote, expend, conse- 
crate yourselves to the holy work of their 
improvement. Pour out light and truth, as 
God pours sunshine and rain. No longer 
seek knowledge as the luxury of a few, but 
dispense it amongst all as the bread of life. 
Learn only how the ignorant may learn; 
how the innocent may be preserved; the 
vicious reclaimed. 

"Teach This People!" 

"Call down the astronomer from the 
skies; call up the geologist from his sub- 
terranean explorations; summon, if need 
he. the mightiest intellects from the council 
chamber of the nation; enter cloistered 
halls where the scholiast muses over super- 
fluous annotations; dissolve conclave and 
synod where subtle polemics are vainly dis- 
cussing their barren dogmas; collect what- 
ever of talent, or erudition, or eloquence, or 
authority, the broad land can supplv, and 
go forth. AND TEACH THIS PEOPLE. 
Fur. in the name of the living God, it must 
he proclaimed that licentiousness shall be 
the liberty; and violence and chicanery 
shall be the law; and superstition and craft 
shall be the religion; and the self-destruc- 
tive indulgence of all sensual and unhal- 
lowed passions shall be the only happiness 
of that people who neglect the education 
of their children. Dispense knowledge 



amongst all as the bread of life. 

"In our country no man is worthy the 
honored name of statesman, who does not 
include the highest practicable education of 
the people in all his plans of administra- 
tion." 

The faith of our fathers in the impor- 
tance of education has been stressed by 
America's leaders since the nation's begin- 
ning. 

George Washington said. "Promote, then, 
as an object of primary importance institu- 
tions for the general diffusion of knowledge. 
In proportion as the structure of a govern- 
ment gives force to public opinion, it is es- 
sential that public opinion should be en- 
lightened." 

Benjamin Franklin said, "The good edu- 
cation of youth has been esteemed by wise 
men in all ages as the surest foundation of 
the happiness both of private families and 
of commonwealths." 

John Adams said, "The whole people 
must take upon themselves the education 
of the whole people and be willing to bear 
the expense of it." 

Said Thomas Jefferson, "If a nation ex- 
pects to be ignorant and free in a state of 
civilization, it expects what never was and 
never will be." 

"Farce, Tragedy or Both" 

"A popular government without popular 
information or the means of acquiring it," 
said James Madison, "is but the prolog to a 
farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both." 

"Without popular education," wrote 
Woodrow Wilson, "no government which 
rests on popular action can long endure; 
the people must be schooled in the knowl- 
edge and if possible in the virtues upon 
which the maintenance and success of free 
institutions depend." 

"We have faith in education as the foun- 
dation of democratic government," said 
Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

Abraham Lincoln, who acquired educa- 
tion and character the hard way, sans bene- 
fit of institutions of higher learning, ob- 
served, in the wisdom that projected him 
to the forefront of great immortals. "An 
educated man is never poor and no gift is 
more precious than education." Thus Lin- 

(Continued on page 30) 




the State of Maryland, the reputation 
of the University extends to all parts of 
the globe, attracting students from half 
a world pway. 

A recent graduating class included 99 
students from 40 countries. 

This chart indicates the birthplaces of 
members of the classes of '51 through '55, 
illustrating the extension of the University's 
educational appeal, in an ever increasing circle, 
far beyond the boundaries of the State 



[4] 



frrotn VariouJ WaltcJ of, <^//i 

MARYLAN 



A UNIVERSITY MAY WELL BE 

JUDGED BY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

OF GRADUATES 

'One imalleit village, the plainest 
home, give ample ipace for the 
resourced of the college-trained 
woman." . . . . ALICE FREEMAN PALMER 




BETTIE McCALL . 
ROBERTS 

Program Director WCAO 



^> C« « ( »X«r ->&*i<~ »X « ? ?X «-^, 




Maryland's Oldest and 

Largest Furrier 

BALTIMORE 

For Christmas, give her 
Her Heart's Desire . . . 

MANO SWARTZ FURS 



Mccormick 

& CO., Inc. 

The World's Largest 
Spice and Extract House 

• BALTIMORE 

• NEW YORK 

• SAN FRANCISCO 

P.S. And be sure to buy 
the tea with the big Mc! 



Furniture 

Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

homes and institutions for 

over 55 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU. 4510 Baltimore, Md. 



^ 



_J 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Since 7866 

Essex 287 Baltimore, Md. 




''(gtolB®lTts!au..." 

BEDICATION of the University's im- 
posingly beautiful chapel is another 
timely reminder of the fact that the Amer- 
ican concept of democracy in government 
is based upon religious belief. The ideal of 
the brotherhood of man roots down into 
the fundamentals of religion. The teach- 
ings of the Hebrew Prophets and of Jesus 
Christ inculcate the idea of brotherhood. 
The growth of the idea inspired the con- 
cepl of democracy in government. It 
ennobled home life. It emphasized the 
sacredness of human personality. 

In statecraft, in business, in industry, in 
law. in the church, in science, or in teach- 
ing, can anything be more intensely fruit- 
ful and practical than faith in the higher 
and finer things of life? 

All over this great land of ours a back- 
to-God movement is happily gaining tre- 
mendous momentum. More than ever 
before, people are earnestly lifting their 
voices in prayer seeking Divine guidance 
with which to solve the many difficult and 
complex present-day problems. 

This spiritual resurgence, which inspires 
confidence in the future, is reflected in 
this University's interdenominational 
chapel, for as a great religious leader said, 
"What the world needs today is not re- 
ligious unity so much as the unity of 
religious people." 

The following, sometimes referred to as 
"The Golden Rule," (Matthew 7:12), is 
expressive of true religious spirit, 

"Therefore all things whatsoever ye 
would that men should do to you, do ye 
even so to them." 

"I hope that every person on the 
campus, or connected with the University, 
will attend as many of the chapel's re- 
ligious services as possible. I ask that the 
members of the University community, 
students, faculty, and administrative staff 
support this program," said Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, University President, who refers to 
the new Chapel as "a house of prayer for 
all people." 

"Only by accepting the basic principles 
of religion can we preserve the finest values 
that we have," Dr. Byrd continued, in 
emphasizing the importance of religion in 
our daily lives. 

"Faith in God is basic to real satisfac- 
tion," Dr. Byrd went on to say, "and 
this faith should be observed and its values 
emphasized. If men and women would 
only turn to the Source of all real strength, 
there would be more brightness, and we 
should have less fear." 

"Personally," Dr. Byrd concluded, "I 
believe that God's spiritual values are 
basic to success in life and to the achieve- 
ment of any worthwhile program." 



N 0l¥ Y0Uc3n { 




pa//jt *s? 



ORIGINAL 



OIL PAINTINGS 



*£«g 




IT'S QUICK... 
IT'S EASY! 
WITH 




<0Mffi& 



DECORATE 
YOUR HOME... 



Or Sell Your Paintings For Profit 

With this fun-filled hobby you can 
paint genuine oils, beautiful beyond 
dreams, from the very start — even 
though you've never held a brush! 
No lessons, no training . . . not even 
any hard-to-follow instructions! PIC- 
TURE CRAFT's "Mystery" canvas 
guides your hand like a Master 
Painter, yet the painting is your own 
original work — signed witli your 
name, expressing YOU! 

GUARANTEED/ 

Men and women of all ages paint 
lovely, large pictures — suitable for 
framing on their first try. 
We guarantee that YOU can 
/^a^-t do the same. Full satisfaction 
kftrijrf or your money back! No 
special equipment needed — 
everything's in the PICTURE 
CRAFT package. Choose 
from 21 gorgeous, artist- 
designed subjects today . . . 
dogs, horses, birds, land- 
scapes and circus scenes. If 
there isn't a PICTURE 
CRAFT dealer in your town, 
write to us at the address 
below. 

$995 

^L per set 

ittctudUty: 

• "Mystery" Artist Canvai 
116" > 12"! 

• Ready-Mixed Oil Colors 

• Special Arlitt'i Brush 

• Complete Pointing 
Instructions 

SOLD BY 

STATIONERY, ART, HANDICRAFT, 

HOBBY and DEPARTMENT STORES 

OR WRITE TO 





28 E. TWENTY-FIFTH ST. 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



[6] 



^friend li] utosts 

to the 
L(nLversitij ^JoLks 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find comfort and conveni- 
ence at your beck and call! 

Free Parking 
Rooms & Cottages 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL 



On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Ave. 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



THE 

WASHINGTON 

BRICK CO. 

Manufacturers & Distributors of 

CLAY PRODUCTS 

COMMON BRICK 

FACE BRICK 
CINDER BLOCK 

SLAG BLOCK 

FLUE LINING 

DRAIN TILE 

SEWER PIPE 

WALL COPING 

There's Nothing Better 
On the Market 

OFFICE & PLANT ON THE 

Washington-Baltimore Blvd. 

MUIRKIRK, MARYLAND 

Phone: TOWER 6300 



Del Haven White House Cottages 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 50 Brick Cottages 

Tile Baths 
F. M. IRWIN, Proprietor TOWER 4852 



Dr. Mary S. Shorb 

CORONET Magazine featured an arti- 
cle by Reed Millard, "Wonder-Worker of 
the Vitamin World" describing how in the 
laboratories of Merck and Co., Inc., at 
Railway, N. J., a group of scientists stared, 
fascinated, at a vial containing an almost 
invisible speck of red substance. They had 
received a report that convinced them a 
mysterious force locked in tiny red crys- 
tals could strike at the stealthy creeping 
sickness of the blood, pernicious anemia. 

The CORONET article then goes on to 
pay tribute to Dr. Mary S. Shorb, of the 
University of Maryland's Department of 
Poultry Husbandry, explaining, "There 
had to be some kind of a 'guinea pig', but 
just what it was remained a mystery until, 
in 1947, from the University of Maryland, 
came the thrilling news. 

"Dr. Mary S. Shorb", the article goes 
on to state, "had noticed something 
strange about a family of bacteria" and 
then the article goes on to pay full meed 
of credit to Dr. Shorb for the initial dis- 
covery and later work in connection with 
it. 

While the CORONET article features, 
quite appropriately, Dr. Shorb's brilliant 
work, it should be noted that, in SCI- 
ENCE magazine, as far back as March of 
1948, similar tribute was paid to Dr. Shorb 
in the same premise referred to in CORO- 
NET. 

Successful Writer 

Do you know June Brown? "June 
Brown" is probably a pen name. PART- 
NERS, the Magazine of Labor and Man- 
agement, Chicago, features an excellently 
written short story titled "Becky's Place," 
by June Brown. 

Introduction of the author goes on to 
explain that "June Brown is wife, mother 
and Theta Sigma Phi cup winner for 
accomplishments in free lance journalism. 
She began her career as publicity director 
for a steamship company shortly follow- 
ing her graduation from the University (if 
Maryland. She is now a resident of Madi- 
son, Wisconsin." 

V.I.P., Maryland 

Elsewhere in this issue appear two 
pages picturing Maryland graduates. 

One page shows graduates with distin- 
guished records of service in the field of 
agriculture. 

The other page features women gradu- 
ates of Maryland who have established 
excellent records in various fields. 

In our last issue we featured the first of 
such pages with distinguished Marylanders 
ranging from the President of Ecuador to 
Chile's Ambassador to Canada. 

No great or special effort has been ex- 
pended in garnering these pictures, their 
collection being rather casual. 

In our next issue we will feature another 
such page. 

Fact is that there are so very many from 
the University of Maryland who have 
gone places and done things that assem- 
bling their names is a task far from dif- 
ficult. 

A University may well be judged by 
the accomplishments of its alumni. 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You Get So Much 
For So Little 

V PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 

V NIACIN for NERVES 
\/ CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

JANUARY 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

S. H. HARVEY, President 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

NEAR UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

WArfield 1010- 2995 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



E. S. McKEOWN 

PLUMBING & HEATING 

• CONTRACTING 

• REPAIRING 

• REMODELING 

• APPLIANCE 

Sales & Installation 
SMALL enough to want your work 
. . . and BIG enough to do it 

WArfield 7695 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



[7] 



FALL CONVOCATION, '52 

President H. C. Byrd Delivers Annual "State of the University 
Message" to Students and Faculty 




Dr. Byrd 



ADDRESSING 4000 students and faculty 
r\ members at the annual fall convoca- 
tion, President H. C. Byrd reaffirmed the 
university's purpose "to take education to 
the people of Maryland who find it im- 
possible to obtain it 
by their own efforts 
and means." 

The Maryland pres- 
ident's c o m m e n t s 
came on the occasion 
of his traditional year- 
ly address on "The 
State of the Univer- 
sity." He told the 
gathering that "more 
and more" off -campus 
educational assistance 
by the University "is 
going to be the ob- 
jective of this university." 

"The modern university must integrate 
itself with the life of the people it serves 
and we have done that to a greater extent 
than any other university in the country," 
added Dr. Byrd. 

Need for Research 

"There is greater need for research in 
the field of social sciences — in many re- 
spects — than there is in the physical 
sciences field," he continued. "Men and 
women of all denominations and creeds 
must learn to live together in peace and 
harmony." 

In presenting the address on the state 
of the growing university, Dr. Byrd re- 
ported to the students and faculty on the 
many additional physical improvements 
now planned. Included in his report as 
soon to be constructed were three wom- 
en's dormitories, 5 men's dormitories, a 
student unon building currently estimated 
at S700.000, and ten fraternity and sororitv 



homes valued at $90,000 each. He also re- 
ported that the new $1,000,000 mathema- 
tics building is approximately 25 percent 
completed. 

Continuing his address, the University's 
president told the audience he feels the 
only thing which could prevent the United 
States from becoming progressively more 
prosperous and greater, would be "the 
lack of people big enough to control it." 
He urged the students to remember that 
"it is up to you who are in this room and 
those like you to see that this country 
maintains its prosperity and world leader- 
ship." 

The university convocation was an an- 
nual feature which also witnesses the first 
mass drilling yearly of the University's 
3.000-man Air Force Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps. Taking part in the pro- 
gram of events, as well, was the school's 
newly formed 120 voice chapel choir. 

At Deans' Request 

Not unlike the annual "State of the 
Union" message delivered by the Presi- 
dent of the United States to the nation 
and the Congress, the annual messages by 
Dr. Byrd were inaugurated several years 
ago at the unanimous requests of the 
deans of Mai viand's various colleges. 

The University has been expanding so 
rapidly in various premises and at all 
levels that various Deans as well as faculty 
heads of departments, immersed in their 
own work and responsibilities, might well 
find it impossible to keep pace in the prog- 
ress of the University as a whole. Hence, 
the appeal to Dr. Byrd to take the rostrum 
at least once each year instead of adhering 
to the policy of previous years of featur- 
ing, at convocations, prominent speakers 
from various walks of life. 



Patrick Honored 

The Washington Chapter of the Na- 
tional Office Management Association hon- 
ored Arthur S. Patrick, Associate Profes- 
sor of Office Management, in the College 
of Business and Public Administration, 
by presenting him with the Leffingwell 
Key. This Key is awarded in recognition 
of outstanding work and sustained interest 
in promulgating and instituting manage- 
ment in the office. 

Professor Patrick has served 1 lie Wash- 
ington Chapter as President, as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors and as chair- 
man of many of the standing committees. 
He is Chairman of the National Commit- 
tee on Institutes and has conducted five 
Institutes on Office Management at Mary- 
land. 

From Africa 

Seeds of South Africa's rarest and love- 
liest flower are on their way from Cape 
Town, South Africa to Maryland for ex- 
perimental work. 



The flower is the red disa (disa uniflora), 
which grows atop Table Mountain and in 
other restricted areas of Cape province. 
The seeds are the first ever to be exported 
to the United States. 

The red disa seeds were germinated in 
a special preparation developed for ship- 
ment by sea lo Marvland for study. 



Gymkana 



The University's Gymkana troupe di- 
rected by Dr. David A. Field presented a 
gymnastics exhibition at Fort Meade. 

The troupe of 50 offered servicemen and 
guests an evening of entertainment includ- 
ing acrobatic dancing, juggling, baton 
twirling, triples balancing, trampolining 
and magic. 

Living up to the nickname, "The Am- 
bassadors of Good Will," Gymkana in the 
past six years has given 125 performances 
to nearly 150,000 at campus social func- 
tions, on television, at schools in six states 
and t lie District of Columbia. 

The troupe is scheduled to appear at a 
benefit performance in Holton - Arms 

[8] 



School's spanking new Moon Memorial 
Gymnasium. 

The team has scheduled meets during 
the past three years and holds victories 
over Duke and Georgia Tech as well as 
being District of Columbia AAU cham- 
pions. 

New Housemothers 

Three dormitories and four sorority 
houses on campus welcomed new house- 
mothers. 

Mrs. Margaret Andrews, for Kappa 
Delta, attended Florida State where she 
was a member of Kappa Delta. She has 
been housemother for KDs at University 
of Florida. 

Sigma Kappa's is Mrs. Helen Fitzgerald, 
a native of Indiana and alumna of Uni- 
versity of Indiana. 

Dorm HH has Mrs. Lizzie Ballard, Suf- 
folk. Virginia, who attended University 
of Virginia, William and Mary and Long- 
wood. 

Mrs. Blanche Gunter, Margaret Brent, 
comes from Frostburg, Md. Her main in- 
terest music, she has been a voice teacher. 

Dorm II has Mrs. Evelyn Cunningham 
from Springfield. Mo. She taught school 
upon graduation and was housemother 
for Beta Theta Pi and Kappa Alpha Theta 
at University of Colorado. 

Alpha Gamma Delta has a native of 
Washington, D. C, Mrs. Jane Dood. 

Mrs. Frances Watson, Silver Creek, New 
Vork, has taken over at Kappa Alpha 
Theta. She attended Maryland College 
for Women and likes, she says, "people, 
outdoors and music." 



Library Site 



After months of deliberation, the site of 
the new library has been definitely set for 
parking lot A annex behind Anne Arundel 
Hall. The exterior plans have been ap- 
proved by Dr. Byrd, but the interior draw- 
ings and floor plans are still embryonic. 

In the present library building new 
shelving was installed and shifting of 
books was intended to accommodate the 
ever-increasing number of volumes. 

In the periodical room, a newly selected 
group of periodicals has increased the 
number of magazines available to the stu- 
dents to nearly 18,000. 

The browsing room, formerly the Agri- 
cultural seminar, contains books chosen 
for pleasure reading by library science 
classes. The Heritage Club, the Great 
Books Series edited by Robert Hutchens, 
and the Book-of-the-Month club con- 
tribute to this selection. As of June 1952, 
there were 21,000 books available, includ- 
ing a large selection of pocket books. 

Also to be found in the browsing room, 
are books that have just come to the 
library. They are placed there for one 
week before thev are sent to the stacks 



upstairs. 



Chess Meet 



The Maryland Chess club is sponsoring 
an invitational chess tournament open to 
graduates, undergraduates, and faculty 
members. Newcomers to the University 
who have had no opportunity to partici- 
pate in previous tournaments were espe- 
cially invited to enter. 



From Korea 

First Lieutenant Charles E. Anthony. 
Jr., (Agr. '51), Phi Delta Theta, is par- 
ticipating in the 25th Infantry Division's 
helicopter training program designed to 
train foot soldiers in how to clear and 
mark landing sites, indicate wind direc- 
tions, mark hazards and assist 'copter 
pilots in loading and unloading. 

In Korea helicopters have proven to be 
invaluable in evacuating wounded directly 
to the hospital and in transporting sup- 
plies to isolated areas of the front lines. 

Lieutenant Anthony entered the Army 
in June 1951 and arrived in Korea in 
March 1952. 

PFC Earl F. Lantz, who attended the 
College of Agriculture, '47-'49, has been 
awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge 
for performance of duty under enemy fire 
while serving as a driver in Tank Com- 
pany, 38th Infantry Regiment, of 2d 
Division. 

Private First Class Lantz entered the 
Army in September 1951 and joined the 
2d Division last April. 

"Very Dangerous" 

Dr. Roy K. Heintz, professor of psy- 
chology, appeared recently on WTOP-TV 
in "My Story," one of a series of pro- 
grams on venereal disease sponsored by 
the District of Columbia Health depart- 
ment. 

Dr. Heintz participated in a discussion 
of the social complications of VD with Dr. 
Ross Taggart, director of the bureau of 
venereal diseases of the D. C. Health 
department. 

Also appearing on the program were 
Mrs. Mary Haworth, columnist for the 
King Features syndicate and the Wash- 
ington Post, and the Rev. Monsignor 
Donal McGowan, head of the health and 
hospital section of the National Catholic 
Welfare conference. 

Besides being the first presentation of 
VD problems on TV, this series is the first 
health program to be given so much time 
on TV. 

The programs, entitled "Very Danger- 
ous," are designed to inform the public 
about venereal disease and to aid in the 
case-finding campaign of the D. C. Health 
department. 

From England 

Dr. A. H. Hawgood, who holds the Chair 
of Modern History and Government at 
the University of Birmingham, England, 
lectured on "Europe Looks at America, 
1952," sponsored by the History and For- 
eign Language Departments. 

Professor Hawgood has appeared at Cal- 
ifornia. Michigan, and Wisconsin Univer- 
sities, as well as Yale and Princeton. 

********** 
FAUX PAS 

The after dinner speaker's upper denture 
jell to the floor, interrupting the speech. 
Like a flash a guest sitting next to him 
handed him another denture. It didn't fit 
and also fell to the floor. The adjacent guest 
handed him another set oj teeth. They 
didn't fit any too good but the speaker got 
by with them. His speech concluded, he 
asked his friend in need, "You're a dentist?" 
"Nope," said the fellow, "undertaker." 



HOMECOMING DAY, '52 

Elizabeth Poisal Crowned Queen as Old Grads Return 

to Alma Mater 



THE next issue of "MARYLAND" will 
feature an account of the complete 
goings-on at a record Homecoming Day, 
October 25. 

The sketchy items herein reported just 
barely managed to make the press dead- 
line. 

Elizabeth Poisal, 19, was crowned home- 
coming queen. 

She is from Hedgeville, W. Va., a junior 
in Arts and Sciences, nominated by Alpha 
Chi Omega sorority. 

Twenty-seven candidates for Homecom- 
ing Queen had been named by campus 
sororities and organizations as well as the 
School of Nursing in Baltimore, Molly 
Turner, Homecoming Publicity Chairman 
had announced. 

All of Them "Queens" 

The entry list included Sigma Delta 
Tau, Gerry Oberfeld; Alpha Chi Omega, 
Elizabeth Poisal; Alpha Xi Delta, Dorothy 
Hooker; Alpha Gamma Delta, Vicky Bar- 
row; Kappa Alpha Theta, Cynthia Brown; 
Phi Sigma Sigma, Diane Blanken; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Rocky Smith; Delta Del- 
ta Delta, Joan Hover; Delta Gamma, Pat 
Siegman ; Alpha Omieron Pi, Pat Wiese ; 
Pi Beta Phi, Donna Harris ; Sigma Kappa. 
Muriel Walker; Alpha Delta Pi, Pat 
Robin; Alpha Epsilon Phi, Lois Schanker; 
Gamma Sigma, Marianne Candela; Kap- 
pa Delta, Bobbie Pridgen; and Gamma 
Phi Beta, Shirley Adams. 

In the dormitories, Margaret Brent en- 
tered Betsy Culbertson; Anne Arundel, 
Betty Kelly; Dorm II, Martha Meyer; 
Dorm III, Margie Gottschalk; Dorm HH, 
Sally Shrott. 

From the organizations, the Independent 
Students association had entered Claire 
Smith, the Daydodgers, Betsy Price, the 
International Club, Carmen Gueveria, and 
the School of Nursing, Nancy Jo Kohlhoss. 

Pre-Gome Show 

The pregame ceremonies started with a 
drill by the A.F. ROTC, 3,200 strong. The 
U. S. Marine Corps Drum and Bugle Corps 
also took part. 



The Maryland Band formed a heart at 
one end of the field. The candidates for 
Queen then gathered in the middle of the 
heart. 

Miss Poisal was crowned by Brig. Gen. 
A. F. Gearhard, deputy chief of chaplains 
of the Air Force, with Tippy Stringer, last 
year's Queen, as aide. 

Halftime saw further doings by the 
Maryland Band and the Marine Drum and 
Bugle Corps. 

Grown Up 

Remarked one fairly recent grad as the 
snappy 144 piece Maryland band did its 
stuff. "We've come a long ways since you 
and I were here." 

The largest AF ROTC, 18 straight foot- 
ball wins, etc., etc., did nothing toward 
dispelling that opinion. 

Even traffic conditions seemed to favor 
the homecoming celebration. 

The usual heavy traffic was on the 
streets and highways leading to the sta- 
dium before and after the game as 30,000 
people headed for the same spot. But, 
police said it was handled easier than at 
any of the other Maryland games this 
year. 

Traffic Improved 

Laurel race track was closed. So, the 
football fans did not have to compete for 
highway space with the race horse people. 
The one-way system on University Lane 
went smoothly. No major traffic jams 
were reported by police after the game. 

Traffic was considered normal by about 
5:30 P.M. which is "something," police 
added. 

The 100-voice Men's Glee Club, under 
assistant Professor of Music Dr. Wester- 
velt Romaine, presented a program at the 
Alumni Banquet in the Dining Hall. 

An Alumni Mixer took place after the 
football game. 

The homecoming crowd danced to the 
music of Ralph Flanagan at the 29th an- 
nual Homecoming Ball. Vocalists Harry 
Prime and Rita Hayes and "The Singing 
Winds" were featured with Flanagan. 



THE PHANTOM STRIKES! 

The teacher of a class of itsy bitsy girls 
noticed a puddle on the floor at the en- 
trance to the cloak room. 

"We do not wish to embarrass the young 
lady who caused that," teacher explained, 
"particularly since, when she grows up to 
be a lady we do not wish to have any of 
her classmates tease her about it." 

"So," the teacher went on to say, "we 
will all pledge to bow our heads, keep our 
eyes closed and not peek and, when we 
open our eyes we expect the puddle to be 
cleaned up." 

So the class bowed heads, closed eyes, 
did not peek. There was the pitter-patter 
of tinv feet, a short interval and then 



another pitter-patter. 

Then the class opened eyes and, lo and 
behold, two puddles under a chalked mes- 
sage on the wall, "The Phantom Strikes 
Again!" 

PROPER EQUIPMENT 

In high gear, dashing to make the bus, 
one of our Phys Ed seniors tripped and 
jell flat on his profile. 

"Are you hurt"?" asked a sweet young 
Home Eccer, helping him up. 

"Naw," replied our hero, "I was wearing 
my light fall suit." 

HOSS SENSE 

There were just as many careless drivers 
in the good old days, but the horses had 
sense. 



9] 



HOTEL [*7 
HEDIN HOUSE 



WASHINGTON'S NEW, COMPLETELY 
AIR CONDITIONED HOTEL 

Just three miles from the 
University of Maryland 

Make the Hedin House your Home 
away from home 

For the Finest in Food and Drink 
head for the Hedin House 

PLANET ROOM 

Dining Room - Cocktail Lounge 

Private dining room available for 

weddings, anniversaries, special 

parties, business meetings 

Phone A Dams 6060 

HOTEL HEDIN HOUSE 

One block inside the District 
2902 Newton St., N.E. (at R. I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 



Jack Blank 

Invites You To 

T 

Test Drive The New 

1952 
PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade*- 
Pontiac 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 

ADAMS 8500 

Washington's Largest 
Pontiac Dealer 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 

Established 1850 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

District 0995 

522- 12th ST., S. W. 

Washington, D. C. 




ENROLLMENTS INCREASE FOR '52 

New Buildings Authorized 

ENROLLMENT figures for the 1952 rapid rate during the coming academic 
September semester at the College term with twelve building projects in either 
Park campus have reached a mark of the construction or the blueprint stage. 
10,192. This is an increase over the same While the ambitious building program 
period last year. lias not yet overtaken the university's aca- 
This figure includes 7,669 undergraduates demic standing, construction plans for the 
and 1.068 graduates actually receiving in- rest of the current year and 1953 will go 
struct ion at College Park and 1,456 stu- far toward the equalization of both levels, 
dents enrolled in the Buildings recently completed, under con- 
College Park colleges struction, or to be started before Novem- 
but taking courses off ber 1, 1952: — 

i campus. Physics building $1,000,000 

■ Largest single en- University Chapel 600,000 

rJk 0am rollment to this date Chemistry building 2,500,000 

■f is in the College of Mathematics building 1,000,000 

| Special and Continua- Student Union building 700,000 

tion Studies with 2,117 Poultry Laboratory building. 400,000 

students. The College Industrial Arts building 400,000 

of Arts and Sciences Ten fraternity and 

has 1,926, while the sorority houses, each 90,000 

| College of Business Warehouse building, plant 

Registrar Preinken and Public Adminis- and maintenance 80,000 

t rat ion reached 1.300. .,,.,., , , • i j 

m . , ^ ,, r, i i. + • 11 nnn Additional proposed st ructuves include : — 

Total College Park enrollment is 11,000, l ,^ ,. , .,,. 

.. B , T . ., tt tj • i 4. A three storv journalism building; 

according to Miss Alma H. Preinkert, , . ,., 

_ . ° A university library ; 

< T f ls , iai- . , , , c 4.1. tt ■ -. Several dormitories for both men and 
Professional schools of the University 

in Baltimore announced a total enrollment ' 

of 3 000 students. A student activities and education 

Maryland's ambitious and expansive building, 

overseas program again offers courses to Construction of the new buildings has 

more than 10.500 armed service and made possible the physical transfer of vari- 

civilian personnel. This renowned exten- ous departments on campus. The depart- 

sion of college course offerings features ment of zoology has moved out of tem- 

83 branches of instruction located in porary classroom building, GG, and has 

Europe and North Africa. taken over the former Chemistry building. 

Throughout the world, there will be ap- The department of journalism and public 

proximately 25.000 students enrolled in the relations and the student publications will 

University of Maryland during the 1952- have the use of the entire temporary hall. 

'53 school year, Miss Preinkert says. The building formerly occupied by the 

agronomy, botany, and physics depart- 
New Buildings ments will this year house only botany and 

Increase and expansion of facilities at the agronomy due to the opening of the new 

University of Maryland will continue at a Pli3 T sics building. 

v ONTIf\fJTAL JVISI 




SIX USAF SKYTERPS 



At Kelly AFB, Texas, six recent Maryland graduates are pictured. From left to right, they are 
Lowell R. Bowen, Harold E. Fink. Enoch Harlan, Jr., Herbert W. Larrabee, Jr Raymond S Lippens, 
and Howard W. Warner. Prior to being assigned to units of the Military Air Transport Serv.ce, 
(MATS) the newly commissioned lieutenants attended indoctrination training at MA lb continental 
Division' Headquarters at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas. Upon graduation they were commissioned. 



10 



MARYLAND ALUMNI 

PROMINENT IN AGRICULTURES 

A UNIVERSITY MAY WELL BE JUDGED 
BY THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF ALUMNI 

— Gjo«Gt Washington 



/^^V 



CT 



4T«fc» 



X 



%> 



>" 



EDWARD F. HOLTER 

International Agriculture Authority 
Master Maryland Grange 




ROY W. LENNARTSON 

Assistant Administrator ot Marketing 
II 5 r>» 



tm»„) «l l^i.nll, 




Washington Evening Star Staff Photo. 

THE WRECK OF THE "MAGGIE B" 

These are some of the girls living in the recreation hall of Margaret Brent dormitory at the 
University of Maryland. It's their living quarters, their closets and their study halls, because of 
overcrowded conditions at College Park. 



THE WRECK 

of the 
"MAGGIE B" 

Women Students Occupy Rec 
Room in Margaret Brent Hall 
as Increases in Enrollment 
Accentuate Need for Con- 
struction and Adequate 
Housing. 

By CHARLES A. McALEER 

Washington Evening Star 

THE housing situation became so critical 
at the University of Maryland that 
freshmen girls enrolling in September had 
to use a recreation room for living 
quarters. 

Girls in Margaret Brent dormitory used 
to call it "the rec." Now they've changed 
the spelling and refer to it as "the wreck 
of Maggie B." 

Facilities were provided there for 30 
girls, only a fraction of the total number 
of students who live on the College Park 
campus or nearby. But it's the recreation 
room which emphasizes the need for more 
housing. 

2,600 Living on Campus 

"We've needed more space all along," 
commented Dr. H. C. Byrd, university 
president. "The students are the ones com- 
plaining now." 



A check of student housing reveals that 
more than 2,600 are living on the campus 
itself. In addition, an estimated 1,000 boys 
and girls, about evenly divided, live in the 
many fraternity and sorority houses dot- 
ting the College Park area. More than 
500 others live in private homes. 

In Margaret Brent hall there were 30 
girls — in 15 double-decked bunks — when 
classes began in September. 

Parents of one girl came for her to re- 
turn her to home in Baltimore. "I don't 
want to go," she replied. "I'm going to 
stay." 

Parents Do the Complaining 

More complaints came from parents 
than from students themselves. 

Some are directed at temporary housing 
units set up in 1946 to meet the heavy 
influx of GI students and intended for 
only three years' use. Of the men, 782 
are in the eight war surplus buildings. The 
other 1,170 occupy 12 permanent-type 
dormitories and have better accommoda- 
tions. 

Of the girls, 595 are housed in four brick 
dormitories at the northern end of the 
campus. Another 57 live in a former Army 
BOQ (bachelor officer's quarters) used last 
year by the university's zoology depart- 
ment and as a nursery. 

The university wants to replace these 
temporary buildings with permanent struc- 
tures. It seeks authorization from the 
Maryland Legislature for a $3.5 million 
appropriation to build them. 

This program includes three more girls' 
dormitories — one costing $600,000 to hold 
180 girls, and two more, each holding 80 
girls and costing a total of $500,000. Also 
included is $1.2 million for two men's dor- 
mitories to hold 225 men each ; $525,000 for 
three smaller buildings to hold 300 men 
and eight small dormitories, costing 



000, for rental to fraternities and sorori- 
ties as housing for 256 men and women. 

Including replacement of the temporary 
facilities, the university figures it is shy 
1.077 accommodations for men and 653 
for women. 

This includes some "day-dodgers" who 
live at home. They prefer to wait for bet- 
ter accommodations at the university 
lather than pay high room rentals off the 
campus. 

Students who live in permanent dormi- 
tories do so rather cheaply under present 
living conditions. Total room and board 
costs $230 a semester, $60 of which is for 
billeting. The food bill is computed at 
$10 a week. Those who live in the tempo- 
rary quarters pay only $50 a semester for 
their room and are not committed to eat 
meals in the university's dining hall. Some 
of these work outside and eat in fraternity 
or sorority houses, public restaurants or 
private homes. 

Problem of Undergraduates 

In the temporary structures the housing 
is crowded but not nearly as bad as it was 
originally. In the Navy-type barracks, of 
which there are two. there used to be four 
men to a room. Now there are only three. 
In the former BOQs there are two to a 
room. 

The present problem at College Park 
involves only the undergraduates, of whom 
there are more than 6,000 so far. Gradu- 
ate and part-time students making up the 
rest of the 10,000 enrollment there do not 
even come in for consideration. 

President Byrd states that the university 
will never meet the full demand for hous- 
ing. 

"The more we put up the more they'll 
come in," he declared. 

The population is increasing, and so is 
the desire to attend college, he pointed out, 
adding that with desire comes the need 
for more housing. 



Alumni Placement 

University of Maryland, Placement Serv- 
ice in charge of Assistant Dean of Men, 
Lewis M. Knebel, now has regular requests 
coming in from Alumni. Any alumnus who 
is interested in changing position would 
be well advised to register so that job 
leads in his field of interest may be sent 
to him. Alumni who are employers are 
asked to keep the Placement Service in 
mind, since this is the best source of con- 
tacting Maryland men for positions. Those 
who have direct contact with members of 
the faculty are encouraged to keep those 
contacts, perhaps sending the Placement 
Office copies of letters so that that office 
may be of assistance. 

On the basis of early requests, it is 
expected that more than 200 companies 
will interview this year through the Place- 
ment Office and the distribution of re- 
quests is expected to be about the same. 

Most of the big national companies and 
many smaller local companies now have 
a definite plan of recruitment of college 
graduates on an annual basis. This assures 
a continual inflow of new blood and top 
management caliber brains. 

This standard pattern is now to send 
trained representatives to the campuses 



12 



and to interview boys in the last half of 
their senior year for full time career em- 
ployees. The shortage of engineering and 
technical personnel has greatly accelerated 
this process. Maryland is sharing to a 
rapidly increasing degree in this program. 

Over fifty major national firms have al- 
ready made dates with the placement office 
to recruit graduating seniors. This is double 
the number signed up at this time last 
year. 

During the 1951-1952 school year nearly 
200 companies interviewed graduating 
seniors at Maryland for positions. A study 
of the number of requests of these com- 
panies shows the following : Mechanical 
Engineers — 63; any college major — 56; 
Electrical Engineers — 42 ; General Business 
Administration — 36; Chemical Engineers — 
34; Aeronautical Engineers — 15; Chemists 
— 25; any engineers — -22; Physics — 21; 
Civil Engineers— 26 ; Industrial Engineers 
(or Management) — 14; Accountant — 8; 
Mathematics — 7; Bacteriologists — 4; Agri- 
culturists^ — 4 ; Education — 2 ; Personnel— 
2; Marketing — 2; Zoology — 2; Botany, 
Home Economics, Food Technology; 
Poultry; Animal Husbandry — one request 
each. Requests for these latter categories 
and others did come to the Placement 
Office, but representatives are usually sent 
only when there is a great demand in one 
or more fields. There were also a few 
campus visits arranged through the 
colleges. 



Faculty Changes 

The University began its new school 
year with twelve changes in faculty per- 
sonnel. 

They included Dr. Herman W. Schamp, 
associate professor of chemistry, formerly 
instructor at the University of Michigan; 
Dr. Gerard A. Bourbeau, associate profes- 
sor of agronomy, formerly technical assist- 
ance consultant with the Mutual Security 
Agency; Dr. Earl C. Crockett, professor 
of economics under the European pro- 
gram, formerly chairman of the depart- 
ment of social science at the University 
of Colorado; Dr. Marvin Wachman, asso- 
ciate professor of history under the Euro- 
pean program, formerly associate professor 
of history at Colgate University; and Dr. 
John W. Gustad, associate professor of 
psychology and Director of the Counseling 
Center, formerly Director of Counseling 
Service at Vanderbilt University. 

Also newly appointed were Dr. J. Wes- 
ley Hoffman, professor in the European 
program, formerly professor and head of 
the department of history at the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee; Dr. Albert H. Cooper, 
visiting professor of chemical engineering, 
formerly professor and head of the de- 
partment of chemical engineering at Buck- 
nell University; and Richard H. Stottler, 
Director of Institutes for the off-campus 
division of the College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies, formerly Educational 
Coordinator for City College of New York. 

Dr. John Dewey of the Philosophy De- 
partment, is on a year's leave of absence 
with Mortimer Adler of the Institute of 
Philosophical Research. Mr. Roy Wigg, 
of Harvard, is a new member of the de- 
partment, replacing Dr. Dewey. Mr. Wigg 
is awaiting his doctor's degree. 



New faculty members in the College of 
Home Economics include Miss Elizabeth 
Collins, Foods and Nutrition; Miss Ruth 
Parker, Textiles and Clothing; and Miss 
Nancy Mearig, Home Management. 

Prof. James B. Outhouse, Agriculture, 
has left to study at Purdue. He was a 
member of the Student Life Committee, 
the Board of Trustees of the Westminster 
Foundation, and coach of the livestock 
judging team. 

Faculty members added to the Staff of 
the Department of Economics include Dr. 
Daniel Hamberg, formerly of the Uni- 
versity of Delaware, author of "Business 
Cycles," Dr. Charles Longley, of Purdue 
University, and Dr. William B. Yeager, 
of Texas A <fe M college. 

Among those to join the CSCS program 
overseas are Ralph Jans, Edwin J. Sell- 
ings, Eugene F. Carraber, and Martin W. 
Mosee of the Government and Politics 
Department ; Stuart Haywood of the 
Mathematics Department; John Keller 
and Roland Stromberg of the History 
Department; John E. Christensen; Truett 
W. Harris of the Foreign Language De- 
partment; and Robert E. Newell of the 
English Department. Martha J. Maxwell 
is a new instructor in CSCS on campus. 

Emily S. Scott has joined the Library 
staff as an instructor, Laurens Jansen is 
a new member of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, and Edward Teague and Mildred 
Stewart have joined the Physical Educa- 
tion staffs. New members of the Agri- 
culture Extension Service are Charlotte 
Conway, Ella Fazzalari, Ruth Johnson, 
Charlotte Mitchell, Jacob Franz, Imogene 
Romino, Laren Hiddleson. Edward J. 
Bullock, Robert L. Bruce, Janet Coblenz, 
Betty L. Wilson, and Judith Messinger. 
Now in the College of Business and Public 
Administration are Eileen Costello, Louise 
Frantz and Arno F. Knapper of the De- 
partment of Office Management, Howard 
W. Wright and C. C. Chen. Frank G. 
Anderson, John Augelli, John C. Herbst, 
Jr., Edward J. Miles, Jerome P. Pickard, 
and William P. Calhoun are new members 
of the Geography Department, and Herbert 
P. Seeber is a new member of the Gov- 
ernment and Politics Department. 

Elliott M. McGinnies has joined the 
Psychology Department, Fague K. Spring- 
mann, the Music Department, Basil C. 
Hotziolos, the Livestock Sanitary Service, 
Leon J. Enright, the Horticulture Depart- 
ment, Lillian B. Larson, the College of 
Home Economics, William 0. Burke, the 
Art Department, John B. Keller, the 
Botany Department, Joseph R. Schulman. 
the Electrical Engineering Department. 
Sing Chen Chang, the State Inspection 
Service, Samuel H. Patterson, the In- 
dustrial Education Department, and Edwin 
L. Resler and Alfred O. Huber, the In- 
stitute of Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics. Frank E. Holleck, Robert 
C. Wood and Mary V. Reed are new 
members of the Bacteriology Department. 
Roy S. Anderson has joined the Physics 
Department, Robert B. Kindred, the In- 
stitute for Child Study, and Sherman K. 
Fitzgerald, the Sociology Department. The 
Nursery School faculty has added Lois H. 
Paradies, Lois M. Hendrix, and Elizabeth 
C. Cassell, and Ronald Herman has joined 

(Continued on page 31) 



$ uller & b'&Ujert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHS 

V NEED 

Since 1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

81 5 TENTH STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



"EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 
For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 N.w York Avenue, N.E. ME 4126 
Washington 2, D.C. 



JAFFE 

• PAPERING 

• PAINTING 

• HOUSE REPAIRS 

METROPOLITAN 2460 



911 13th St. N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



modern 
machinists co. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girord St.. N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



[13] 



THE POWER OF ADVERTISING 



Remember" Sapolio"? 
"Pear's"? "Pearline"? "Omars"? 

By John P. Cunningham 

Ncwcll-Emmett Co. 

PUBLICITY is the hand-maiden of public relations. Advertising is the 
hired wench . . . commercial, brash, outspoken. 

But like the powerful Katrinka in Fontaine Fox's cartoon series, this 
hired wench is a great power in the house of industrial America. 

I'd first like to call attention to the beginnings of American advertising. 
It began in the Philadelphia Public Ledger, dated March 25. 1836. Every- 
thing in it was written 116 years ago. 

Only the Beginning 

There were no pictures, no cartoons, no big headlines on the pages. 
Just plain small type. One of the many advertisements on the front page 
read: — 

"Straw Bonnets — M. Saunders. No. 4 South Second Street, have on hand 
an extensive assortment of Straw Bonnets, consisting in part of the follow- 
ing descriptions: — Patria lace and Tuscan Grecians; tissue Tuscan and 
other fancy Cottages; plain straw ditto; and fancy Gipseys; children's 
fine Straw Hats and Caps. Leghorn Bonnets — women's flats and crowns. 
ditto. 

"The subscriber by the good quality of his materials and moderate 
prices, hopes to merit a share of the public patronage, and to retain it by 
a strict and steady attention to business." 

Advertising was simple and earnest then. But let's see what happened 
to advertising in the next 100 years. 

Recently I took a picture about a half block from my office, I had it 
enlarged. It showed what at first glance seemed to be a section of an 
average New York cross-street. 

But within forty feet of the camera one noticed the following things: 

Advertising Everywhere 

Here, staring up from the sidewalk, was a handbill announcing that 
brakes will be relined nearby for $16.90. Here was a discarded matchbox 
telling you to insist on Gillette Blue Blades. Tucked under this man's 
arm was a newspaper which presented to view the current Macy offerings 
in furniture. There was the torn half of the familiar brown Hershey 
chocolate bar wrapper. The windows were full of advertising. Hanging 
signs reached out to intercept the vision. A railway express truck went 
by with a passing reminder to chew Wrigley's. 

Even the cars parked alongside the curb flaunted their familiar ad- 
vertising trade-marks. 

Here, in a few square yards of city street, were many corporations, big 
and little, striving and crying for success through their printed voices — 
advertising. 

It's all advertising. It's everywhere. You can't escape it. It gets into 
your home with your evening news, with your TV and radio programs. 
It is in the air all around us. All we need is a few radio tubes to translate 
it into sound and TV to present it to view. Yet strangely enough, nobody 
knows a greal deal about it that is even scientific or factual. There seems 
to be only one absolutely known fact about advertising. It can be ex- 
pressed in two words: 

"Advertising Pays" 

To state the reverse of that, when large going concerns built by ad- 
vertising think they are in and cut their advertising, they die like dead 
ducks. That's the way it always has been. 

Where are the soaps of yesteryear? Sapolio? Pears? In their day they 
were the best advertised products in the world — these two soaps— and 
the equivalent in fame of today's Ivory and Lux. 

A few years ago. a large New York office building was torn down. And 
there on the wall — in milehigh letters — was this verse, which had been 
hidden for years: 

Man Wants Hut Little IU re Below 
But Woman Want SAPOLIO. 

Yet few of today have ever heard of Sapolio. 

Remember Them? 

Where are the automobiles? Just for instance take the cars beginning 
with the letter "A"— Auburn, Austin. "P"— Pierce Arrow, Peerless, Paige. 
Or the ones beginning with the letter "R"— Rickenbacker, Rockne, Roose- 




WANT TO BUY 

CHINCHILLAS? 

or, maybe CEMENT? 

THIS is a chinchilla? Elsewhere in these pages, 
where it has appeared issue after issue, Sparks' 
Chinchilla Farm advertises these little fellows for sale. 

At first blush 
one might ask, 
"What chance 
to sell chin- 
chillas through 
a college mag- 
azine?" Well, 
Mr. Sparks 
can, of course, discontinue his ad at any time. But 
he says, "Keep on printing it. It brings results. I 
sell plenty of chinchillas through that ad." Then he 
went on to tell about a mail order for a pair of 
chinchillas from a Maryland alumnus, an M.D. in 
West Virginia, and many other such orders. 

Not long ago a fellow came into our office asking 
for a job in the advertising department. He said, 
"For another publication I called on the M. J. Grove 
Lime Company near Frederick. Mr. R. B. Crothers, 
head of the M. J. Grove Company, said, reaching for 
a copy of 'MARYLAND,' "This is the finest adver- 
tising we have. People come in here, tell me they 
saw our ad in 'MARYLAND' and they buy lime." 

Says Mr. G. Hale Harrison, of Harrison Hall, Ocean 
City hotel, "Many of our guests, upon making reser- 
vations or registering, say 'I saw your ad in 'MARY- 
LAND.' ' " 

Lieutenant Colonel Bob Walton, stationed in 
Vienna a few years ago, wrote about a Christmas 
party in his charge for crippled, orphan children. 
Colonel Walton needed cash, clothing, etc. These 
columns printed a short appeal for support. The 
party was quite a success. It was a University of 
Maryland party for those kids in Austria. Later 
Colonel Walton and his Commanding General wrote 
to thank Maryland alumni. 'MARYLAND' readers 
alone had put the party over. 

Advertising space should never be purchased on a 
'help the magazine,' or 'contribution' or 'donation' 
basis. Rather it should be sold on a commodity basis, 
i.e., just like you'd buy a necktie or a TV set. "So 
many dollars per inch, per issue, per thousand paid 
circulation." 

Advertisers in 'MARYLAND' appear there again 
and again. The publication enjoys an excellent repu- 
tation among advertising agencies. 

No other collegiate magazine compares with 
'MARYLAND' in volume and content. Our advertisers 
make this possible. 

Our readers know this and they do make special 
efforts to patronize our advertisers. In doing so, they 
should and usually do mention 'MARYLAND.' 

We referred to the chinchillas, the cement, and 
Bob Walton's party as an introduction to the adja- 
cent article by John P. Cunningham, one of the 
greatest authorities on the value of advertising. 



velt. 

In the almost forgotten past are such once well-known 
names as Atwater Kent radio, Columbia gramophones, 
Pearline, Omar Cigarettes. You scarcely realize that 
they are gone. In almost every instance merchandising 
and advertising pressure was lifted from these brands 
due to their wonderful feeling of success. Slowly but 
invisibly — they died. 

Advertising is a strange, powerful force that cannot 



141 




when you ride relaxed and warm 

by GREYHOUND 



GREYHOUND 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 

Heating 
Ventilating 
Plumbing 
Air Conditioning 

• 
Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 

1240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



TO SAVE FUEL 

see DR. BUELL for 

CARBURETOR & IGNITION 
SERVICE 

811-lOth St., N.W. ME 8-5777 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 



be scientifically applied, hut its power is 
always there, even among people who do 
not believe in it or believe they are 
affected by it. Let me tell you a personal 
story on this. 

I remember that my father was very 
much disappointed when I told him I had 
gotten a job in the advertising business. 
He was a New England shoe manufacturer. 
To him the only successful commercial 
operation that there was, was the exchange 
of the manufacturer's goods for the dealer's 
money. 

"Oh, Any Kind" 

He came through New York after I had 
been at work a few weeks. We had dinner 
together. He kidded me about being in 
such a blue-sky, Imllyhooish, inconclusive 
business. He said "Advertising has never 
had the slightest effect on anything I ever 
sold or on anything I ever bought. When 
I read a magazine, I just don't see the 
advertisements. And there are millions 
like me." 

After dinner the old gentleman stopped 
at a drugstore saying he wanted a tube of 
toothpaste. 

"What kind do you want?" said the 
clerk. "Oh, any kind," said my father. 

The clerk reached down under the 
counter and held out a pinkish-grayish 
tube of toothpaste. "What's that?" said 
my father. 

"Oh, that's the new Excello toothpaste. 
We're having a special on it. Extra big 
tube only 25c." 

"Well," said the old gentleman dubi- 
ously. "I don't think I want that. I 
never heard of it." 

"All right, sir, what kind do you want?" 
said the clerk. 

"Oh, anything," said my father again. 
"Colgate, Kolynos, Pepsodent, anything'" 
He accepted Colgate's. 

He might just as well have said, "I'll 
take any advertised brand." 
Mass Production 

We know that much money is wasted 
in advertising; for instance, during the 
war you saw many nut and bolt advert isers 
whose names you have forgotten and 
whose products you will never buy, ad- 
vertising to escape taxes. Also pick up any 
copy of the Saturday Evening Post and 
you will see dull advertising, strange names 
that are in today and out tomorrow. 
Nevertheless, advertising, next to mass 
production, has probably done more to 
cut prices and increase comforts than any 
other force. It has made mass production 
possible. 

Let's look at the record. Few of us are 
old enough to remember when oranges 

*•••*•••** 

REMEMBER? 

Who remembers, "Let the Gold Dust 
Twins Do Your Work," "Have You a 
Little Fairy in Your Home?" (Fairy 
Soap), "Good Morning! Have You Used 
Pear's Soap?" Who remembers Douglas, 
the bald headed shoe man? Allen, the 
Foot-ease fellow? Swamp Root, Kickapoo 
Indian remedy? 

The slogans and ads stopped. The prod- 
uct died. They were all contemporaneous 
with the bewhvskered Smith Brothers. 
Their advertising continued. They're still 
with us. So are their coughdrops. 



"Electrically 
Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 

^T vvICTRiCALjD^ ^ 



TRISTATE 



ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS • SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 

• 

OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 



N. E. Kefauver, Jr. 

HAY • STRAW • GRAIN 

MASSEY - HARRIS 

FARM MACHINERY 



Telephone 30 



MIDDLETOWN, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
HOW. Patrick St. • Frederick, Md. 



were a Christmas-time luxury generally 
found in the toe of your stocking and 
costing $1.00 a dozen. Now they are a 
healthful daily item, in millions of homes, 
and advertising has been responsible. The 
average advertising cost per dozen is %o 
of a cent. 

Advertising made Kodak Cameras pos- 
sible — put them in millions of homes at 
continuously lower prices by telling a 
hundred million people about them at 
once rather than by waiting for word of 
mouth to operate, which probably would 
have taken a hundred years. 

Belt Line Took Over 

In the cast 1 of electric refrigerators, in 
1920 the average price was several hundred 
dollars. Advertising told America about 
this marvelous new ice maker for the 
home. Demand grew. Mass production 
and the belt line took over, and before 
the war you could get an electric refrigera- 
tor for as little as $89.00. 

Take the automobile. Advertising 
brought it down to as low as $650 before 
the war from two or three thousand dollars. 
In England, where they had mass produc- 
tion but no highly developed advertising 
technique, they never got their automobile 
— a poorer, smaller product — much below 
$1,000. Their advertising never sold enough 
of them to enough people. 



[15] 





concrete 
products co. 

CINDER • SLAG • LINTELS 
CONCRETE BLOCKS 

centervi I le, m d . 



B. B. BAKER 

& SONS, Inc. 

Road Contractors 

Specializing in Macadam & Gravel 

NEW MARKET SAND & GRAVEL 
FOR SALE 

PHONE 3351 

QUEENSTOWN, MD. 



The Eley 
Construction Co. 

CONTRACTORS 
& BUILDERS 

"We Build and Finance 
Homes" 

OFFICE— HILLSBORO 3211 
NITE PHONE— 3212 

QUEEN ANNE, MARYLAND 



WYE PLANTATION 

Home of William Paca, Signer of Declaration of Independence, 
Retains Early Colonial Charm 




A WYE PLANTATION BEAUTY SPOT 

Three ancient Lindens beside a brick walk. 



Photo by House and Garden 



By Sally L. Ogden 

REFLECTING the charm and simple 
dignity of life in a former era, Wye 
Plantation, near Queenstown on the East- 
ern Shore, stands today as a magnificent 
monument to the gracious heritage of the 
people of Maryland. Once the home of 
William Paca, early governor of the state 
and a signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, the original beauty of this fine, 
old landmark has been superbly restored 
by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., 
its present owners. 

Old Plantation 
The other day, we called on the Hough- 
tons and were greeted by our host in the 
"Court House," a beautiful and modern 
interpretation of plantation living. Over- 
looking broad, rolling meadows that ex- 
tend to the banks of the great Wye River, 
the view from the "Court House" surpasses 
most — even on the Eastern Shore. 



Mr. Houghton, who is president of the 
Corning Glass Company, Corning, New 
York, explained that he was first attracted 
to Wye Plantation during a visit to the 
shore in 1939. Shortly thereafter, he ar- 
ranged for its purchase and enlisted the 
aid of architects William G. Perry and 
Arthur A. Shurcliff (both of whom took 
part in the restoration of Colonial Wil- 
liamsburg) for the restoration of the orig- 
inal 18th century gardens. A historian in 
his own right, Mr. Houghton sought accu- 
rate evidence of detail and great care was 
taken to reproduce the setting faithfully. 
Clipped Yews 

Strolling with our host among the series 
of broad terraces — some edged with care- 
fully trained and well clipped yew hedges, 
others with soft English boxwood — we 
could understand some of Mr. Houghton's 
enthusiasm for the restoration of these sur- 
roundings. Here and there, at entrances 
to the terraces, we saw delicate white gates 



[16] 



framed in boxwood, while a pair of Chip- 
pendale Tea Houses provided a shady re- 
treat and an accent for the garden rooms. 
Edging the brick walk that leads to the 
original house of the estate were full- 
branched lindens, three of which have sur- 
vived since the time of the Pacas. One 
particularly eye-catching setting was a 
rope hammock slung between two magni- 
ficent English yews — the original trees of 
the plantation — whose low branches pro- 
vided a deep shade. 

Angus Cattle 

Over in the luxurious meadows, the 
black shapes of our host's pure-bred An- 
gus cattle dotted the landscape. A prize 
herd of more than 300, these cattle repre- 
sent the results of a long-range program 
of interbreeding with Scotch Angus, de- 
signed to produce a superior breed. This 
enterprise was started for Mr. Houghton 
several years ago by James B. Lingle, man- 
ager of the 1500 acre plantation. 

There are three houses on the estate 
and several additional farm buildings. The 
old house, next to the library, was built 
in 1740 and the third and smallest house, 
which is used for dining, was built in 1690. 
Easily accessible, the library was con- 
structed in 1941. (The building was not 



connected to either house, physically, since 
this would destroy the original architec- 
ture.) Here is contained Mr. Houghton's 
fabulous collection of manuscripts and first 
editions, among which are such items as 
the original manuscripts of poems by 
Keats and Boswell's Life of Samuel John- 
son, and a copy of the Gutenberg Bible. 
Like Parasols 

The grounds of the plantation are main- 
tained by Karl Fischer, chief gardener, to- 
gether with a staff of eight assistants. As 
we walked through an enclosed garden 
among towering hawthorns, clipped in the 
shape of parasols, our host told us of the 
thrill he experienced in discovering and 
restoring the original terraces, which had 
become grazing pastures during the Civil 
War, and of finding the original walks that 
were partially hidden. We were impressed 
by the boundless enthusiasm of this man, 
a comparative newcomer to Maryland, for 
the preservation of our state's priceless 
store of historic architecture. 

He is an energetic supporter of the plan 
for the restoration of the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland. Together with men like former 
United States Senator George L. Radcliffe 
and James W. Foster of the Maryland His- 
torical Society, he anticipates nationwide 




AT WYE PLANTATION 

Cherry petals drop into an ivy-edged pool. 



Photo by House and Garden 




• FRUIT TREES 

• ASPARAGUS ROOTS 

• STRAWBERRIES 

• SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 

• ROSES • HEDGES 

• FLOWERING SHRUBS 




Write now for BIG FREE cata- 
log. Forty colorful pages packed 
with information, shows all the 
Bunting flowers, plants, berries, 
small fruits, evergreens and 
trees. Guaranteed to start you 
reaching for a hoe! Write 
today! 

BUNTINGS' 

NURSERIES, INC. 



BOX 110 
SELBYVILLE, DELAWARE 



Berlin 
Milling 

Company 

Incorporated 1909 

Berlin's Besf Feeds 

BERLIN, MARYLAND 



17 



interest in this project and the attraction 
of millions of persons to the now easily 
accessible Eastern Shore. Organizations 
such as the Society for the Preservation of 
Maryland Antiquity are keenly interested 
in the plan, which, upon completion, will 
represent the first time in the history of 
the United States that an entire area of 
this size has been restored. The undertak- 
ing contemplates the restoration of 45 
buildings — schools, jails, customs houses, 
etc. — over the entire area of the Eastern 
Shore. Old Wye Church in Talbot County 
is the first building to be completed. 

A Modern Pace 

Lost in our own thoughts for a moment 
in the beautiful setting of the gardens of 
Wye plantation, we thought of our host 
as a modern William Paca in tweeds. His 
enthusiasm and respect for this fine, old 
landmark, its values, and the importance 
of its preservation — all of these things 
mark him as a perfect heir to the tradi- 
tion of Wye Plantation. 



HARRISON & 
JARBOE 

Canners of Quality Tomatoes 

BRANDS: Harrison & Jarboe 
Sherwood Dover Claiborne 

SHERWOOD, MARYLAND 
Phone: Tilghmon 4101 



Key Chevrolet Sales 

FACTORY 

K^heurolet- L^aaiilac 

FRANCHISE DEALER 
Frederick Maryland 




BRADLEY'S 
HATCHERY 

BroilerBred Chicks 

N. Aurora Street 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



As we were leaving the estate, we paused 
for a moment to read the historical tablet 
at its entrance : 

WYE PLANTATION 
HOME OF WILLIAM PACA, 
SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION 
OF INDEPENDENCE AND TWICE 
GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND. 
BORN AT CHILBURY HALL, 
HARFORD COUNTY. 1740. 
DIED 1799. 
Driving on, we reflected that Wye Plan- 
tation is in good hands. 




CHARLES CARROLL SAMUEL CHASE 



LLIAM PACA THOMAS STONE 



FOUNDING FATHERS 

MARYLAND'S four signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence included William Paca 
of Wye Plantation. 



The Visiting Firemen 

The nineteenth annual fire service short 
course was conducted at Maryland in Sep- 
tember. 

The schedule of events was greatly ex- 
panded for this year's course and featured 
an intense program 
unequaled in any uni- 
versity in the country. 
Highlight of the 
four-day conclave was 
a series of classes 
which pitted the 400 
attending firemen 
against flame-engulfed 
homes, and showed 
them, by experience, 
the best use of gas 
i masks. The classes in- 
Jfe eluded grass and brush 

™ > ■« I fire fighting, fire pre- 

Director Byrus vention, ventilation, 
liquid fires, and fire 
fighting tactics. 

The opening address to the visiting fire- 
men was made by Chief Fred Wells, of 
Fargo. N. D. He served as instructor for 
the class in fire fighting tactics. 

"The point which we would like our citi- 
zens to realize is that we consider that our 
biggest job is fire prevention," said Robert 
C. Byrus, director of the University's fire 
service extension, "fighting the fires before 
thev occur." 




TIEDER & GOOTEE 

APPLIANCE SALES & SERVICE 

Electrical Contractors 

Installation, Maintenance & Repairs 
House Wiring and Motor Work 



Day Phone 1225 
510 Maryland Ave. 



• Night Phone 1245 
Cambridge, Md. 




E. S. ADKLNS & COMPANY 

"Everything Needed for Building" 
PHONE 3171 SALISBURY, MD. 



Yolunteer firemen comprised the major- 
ity in attendance, most of them giving up 
their yearly business vacations to take 
part. 

Trans-State Conferences 

Officers of Maryland's volunteer fire 
companies again meet in leadership con- 
ferences with officials of the University's 
Fire Service Extension. 

Commencing on October 29 at Galena, 
14 such conferences are scheduled for 
various communities. Discussions will 
chiefly concern administrative problems, 
and the general topic, "How the volunteer 
fire companies can best protect their towns 
from fire and accident." 

Towns and local companies will co- 
sponsor the conferences. Director C. Byrus 
will serve as chairman at the meetings. 

The State's firemen are chiefly volun- 
teers. "One of our biggest problems is to 
maintain the volunteer fireman's interest 
m this volunteer work," Director Byrus 
stated, 'and all realize the sacrifices made 
by them. It has justly been said that the 
volunteer fire company contributes more 
to its community by accident than do 
most organizations on purpose." The 
schedule-: 



9. Hagerstown 

Nov. 24 



1. Galena Oct. 29 

2. Cambridge Oct. 31 

3. Walkersville 10. Aberdeen Nov. 25 

Nov - 3 11. Leonardtown 

4. Ellicott City Nov. 28 

Nov. 10 12. Princess Anne 

5. Waldorf Nov. 11 Dec. 1 

6. Annapolis Nov. 13 13. Denton Dec. 2 

7. Oakland Nov. 18 14. Hampstead Dec. 3 

8. Corriganville 

Nov. 19 

Currently being conducted is its annual 
program of home-town training courses 
for firemen. 

Last year's similar activity saw 4,000 
enrolled for over 30 classroom hours each. 
Enrollment and attendance is voluntarv. 



Sally Ladin Ogden 

Advertising Director of 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 

Announces the opening of 
new offices at 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOpkins 7294 



E. MACE SMITH 

Buyers & Shippers of Farm Produce 

FERTILIZERS, FEEDS OF ALL KINDS, 

BEAN BASKETS, ETC. 
Phone 163 Princess Anne, Md. 



WEBSTER 

"THE COAL MAN" 

SMALL LOTS TO CARLOADS 

Call Hurlock 3561 or 3571 

East New Market, Md. 



18 



School of 



Pharmacy 



B. Olive Cole 




Miss Cole 



Pharmacy Centennial 

THE School of Pharmacy was well repre- 
sented at the Centennial Celebration of 

the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

held in Philadelphia. 
Dean Noel E. Foss as Vice-President of 

the American Association of Colleges of 

Pharmacy, and with Andrew Bartilucci, 
graduate student, pre- 
sented a paper in the 
Scientific Section. Dr. 
George P. Hager par- 
ticipated in the pres- 
entation of three 
papers in the Scientific 
Section, one with John 

B. Harmon, graduate 
student, and Dr. John 

C. Krantz, another 
with Kenneth Stahl, 
and the third with 
Wei-Chin Liu. The 
last two mentioned 

recently received the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree from the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Frank J. Slama also attended the 
sessions of the Plant Science Seminar, 
which were held the week preceding the 
Centennial Celebration. Dr. Donald Sha3 r , 
together with Carl E. Beck, graduate stu- 
dent, and Dr. W. Arthur Purdum, present- 
ed a paper in a session of the American 
Society of Hospital Pharmacists. 

Dr. B. Olive Cole was honored with 
membership on the General Committee on 
the Centennial Celebration, and presented 
a paper on the History of the Women's 
Section and of the Women's Auxiliary of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

The Centennial Celebration, which ex- 
tends through the first three days of the 
Convention, was colorful, enjoyable, im- 
posing and inspiring. Representatives of 
pharmacy from many foreign countries 
were present and participated in the pro- 
gram. Representatives of all branches of 
pharmacy participated in the procession at 
the Special Ceremonial Session at which 
time there were greetings from foreign and 
domestic organizations and scrolls convey- 
ing congratulations and felicitations from 
many allied organizations were also pre- 
sented. 

Other members of the faculty of the 
School of Pharmacy were Dr. Benjamin F. 
Allen, Dr. C. T. Ichniowski and John 
Autian. 

Of particular interest to the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of Maryland 
was the luncheon at the Engineers Club, 
arrangements for the get-together having 
been made by Dr. Robert Simonoff and 
Dr. M. J. Andrews. The group in attend- 
ance represented graduates from many 
parts of the country and Puerto Rico, 
their wives and former professors of the 
faculty. 

The list included: Dr. Benj. F. Allen, 
Dr. and Mrs. M. J. Andrews, Charles S. 
Austin. Jr., John Autian, Andrew Bartiluc- 
ci. B. Olive Cole. Mary Ann Coleman. Mr. 



and Mrs. Morris C. Cooper. Dr. John M. 
Cross, Dr. T. T. Dittrich, Mrs. A. G. Du- 
Mez. Dr. and Mrs. R. Ellin, Dr. and Mrs. 
Noel E. Foss, Dr. and Mrs. Walter C. 
Gakenheimer, Dr. George P. Hager, Dr. 
Walter H. Hartung, Dr. Casimer T. Ich- 
niowski, Mrs. Glenn L. Jenkins, Dr. and 
Mrs. L. M. Kantncr, Dr. and Mrs. LeRoy 
C. Keagle, Mr. Oscar Khoze, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo B. Lathroum, Dr. J. P. LaRocca, Mr. 
Norman J. Levin, Dr. L. L. Manchey, Dr. 
Albert Mattocks, Herman M. Mupcik, 
Earl M. Norris, Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Nor- 
ris, Mrs. W. Arthur Purdum, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen J. Provenza, H. R. Rudy, Jr., Dr. 
and Mrs. Frank J. Slama, Mrs. Robt. L. 
Swain, R. T. Sanner, Helen Reed Seitz, Dr. 
Robert Simonoff, Dr. Pierre F. Smith, Dr. 
R. H. Stahl, Dr. Ludmilla Stass, Mr. and 
Mrs. Manuel B. Wagner, Dr. Kenneth 
Waters and Warren Weaver. 

The sessions of the related organizations, 
The American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy, National Association of Boards 
of Pharmacy, American Society of Hospi- 
tal Pharmacists, American College of 
Apothecaries, National Conference of State 
Pharmaceutical Association Secretaries and 
the Women's Auxiliary were also held. 
Many members of the faculty of the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land participated in these sessions. 

Second Cooper Invention 

Morris L. Cooper, graduate of Mary- 
land's School of Pharmacy, has invented a 
new capsule selector designed to eliminate 
guesswork in choosing the size capsule to 
be used in filling a prescription. 

The invention was described in a paper 
read before a meeting of the American 
Pharmaceutical Society in Philadelphia. It 
is Mr. Cooper's second invention, the first 
being a new-type mortar and pestle, the 
pharmacist's grinding equipment. 

In South America 

Miss Georgianna S. Gittinger, Instructor 
in Pharmacology, spent her 1952 vacation 
in South America, and visited former stu- 




LITERAL, WOT? 

Two newspaper men arrive at the Coliseum 
to cover a sports event. 



ALOE 



HOSPITALS 

PHYSICIANS 

LABORATORIES— 

Enjoy the Advantage of One 

Complete Source for All 

Equipment, Instruments and 

Supplies 



A. S. ALOE 
COMPANY 



1501 - 14th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Hudson 7252 



Save 

For Your 

Future 

BUY 

U.S. DEFENSE 

BONDS 



JOHANNES & MURRAY 
Silver Spring, Md. 



19' 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS, RICHMOND ALUMNI CLUB 

Left to right: — Bob Condon, Gerard Martin, Susan Rinehart Kummer, Paul Mullinix, Dave Brigham, Alumni Secretary, Betty Beeks, Taylor P. Rowe, 
Oakley Roach and John Savage. 



dent, Miss Cecilia Hartmann, in Bogota, 
Colombia. Miss Hartmann is Director of 
Control for FROSST LABORATORIES. 
In Lima, Peru, Miss Gittinger spoke at a 
meeting in the MALDONADO MUSEUM 
OF HISTORIC PHARMACY, describing 
private collections of Baltimore pharma- 
cists. Dr. Fernando Montesinos, Professor 
of Pharmacology, asked her to speak to the 
students at the Pharmacy School of San 
Marcos University. She listed extra-cur- 
ricular activities at the Maryland School, 
and answered numerous questions; after 
this she was a luncheon guest at the Coun- 
try Club, together with Dean Fortunato 
Carranza and Dr. Juan B. Lastres, Secre- 
tary of the Peruvian Society of the History 
of Medicine, of which she is a member, 
and several other members of the Faculty. 
Dr. Montesinos took her to visit the Head- 
quarters Building of the Peruvian Pharma- 
ceutical Association, and one of the big 
drug factories, LABORATORIOS UNI- 
DOS. In addition she was frequently in- 
vited to the homes of her many Peruvian 
friends for luncheon, tea and dinner, and 
was taken on trips to Chosica, Callao and 
surrounding beaches. 

Bransky Honored by Japan 

Joseph M. Bransky (Pharm '14), Dis- 
trict Supervisor of the Federal Bureau of 
Narcotics with headquarters in Philadel- 
phia, was elected by the Japanese Pharma- 
ceutical Association to honorary member- 
ship. The award was made in recognition 
of the assistance he gave in 1946 in estab- 
lishing the Japanese Council of Pharmacy 
and in raising the standards of pharmacy 
and pharmacy schools in Japan. He is 
well known to the pharmacists in the 
southern New Jersey counties which are 
part of the district he supervises. A 
registered pharmacist in several states, his 
practical experience helps him as well as 
pharmacists of his district to avoid the 
pitfalls encountered by other enforcement 
officials who do not have his background 
of experience. He was the speaker at the 
annual dinner of the National Rho Chi 
Society, which was held in Philadelphia 
at the time of the Centennial Celebration 
of the Amercian Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

Another Year 

Classes started with a registration of 
290 students, 70 new and 29 graduate. 

New assistants on the staff are : Allen 
Brickman, Robert Kokoski, Frank Milio 



and Bernard Miske in Pharmacy ; Louis 
M. Winters in Pharmacology; John J. 
Josten in Bacteriology. John Autian is 
now Instructor in Pharmacy, Louis R. 
Stezzi in Chemistry, and Paul A. Pumpian 
Junior Instructor in Administration. Frank 
A. Dolle is the new Instructor in Zoology, 
since John H. Applegarth resigned. Ber- 
nard Misek has been transferred from 
Chemistry to Pharmacy. Allen Brickman, 
Robert Kokoski and Frank Milio received 
the B.S. in Pharmacy from Maryland in 
1952; John J. Josten received the B.S. 
degree from the University of Cincinnati 
and the M.S. from Miami; Louis Michael 
Winters received the B. S. in Pharmacy 
from Duquesne; Louis R. Stezzi received 
the B. S. in Pharmacy and the M. S. degree 
from Temple. 



Disposition of Graduates 

Lee Ming Chow, Ph. D. '52 is as- 
sociated with Dr. Walter H. Hartung 
in Pharmaceutical Chemistry at North 
Carolina. Ludmila Kreigel-Stass, who 
was assistant here last year is Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy at Xavier, New 
Orleans. Martha L. Adams, M. S.. is 
at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds. John 
B. Harmon, M. S. '52 is with the DuPont, 
Wilmington, Del. Carl E. Beck, M. S. 
'52, is Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
at Kentucky. Franklin D. Cooper, M. S. 
'52, is Chief Pharmacist at George Wash- 
ington Hospital, Washington. Herman M. 
Mupsik, grad student in Pharmacy, work- 
ing for Ph. D. is at Rhode Island College 
of Pharmacy and Allied Sciences. Joseph 
A. Kaiser, M.S. '52, is grad Assistant in 
the Bio-chemistry Department, Maryland. 



Orientation '52 

Faculty were presented to the new- 
comers. Class advisors were introduced. 
A short history of the School of Pharmacy 
was given. Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, 
Pharmacy '97, addressed the new students 
on "The Science of Pharmacy." Repre- 
sentatives of Rho Chi; Terra Mariae, the 
Year Book, Students' Auxiliary of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, and 
the Student Branch of the APA, were 
presented. 

The first all-school party was held on 
October 10, at Cadoa Hall. Dr. Frank J. 
Slama was in charge of arrangements. 



UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 

ALUMNI CLUBS 



Baltimore Alumni Social Season 

THE University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Baltimore were planning to 
open their Fall season as this issue of 
MARYLAND went to press; a dinner 
meeting is scheduled for the Sheraton 
Belvedere Hotel, with Dale Carnegie as 
the guest speaker. The Honorable Theo- 
dore R. McKeldin, Mayor D'Alesandro, 
and Judge William P. Cole were to be 
guests along with the University President 
H. Byrd. 

The Club plans an interesting Fall and 
Winter program and some of the events 
scheduled will be a dinner-dance in Janu- 
ary; a benefit performance to be held in 
March ; the Annual Business Meeting and 
Election of Officers to be held in May; and 
a summer outing is scheduled for July. 

Dr. William H. Triplett is Program 
Chairman, and under his direction the 
Club is looking forward to a year of in- 
teresting and entertaining events. 



National Symphony 

Again on the University's cultural pro- 
gram will be the annual concert series of 
the National Symphony Orchestra. 

Each of the four scheduled concerts will 
be held in Ritchie Coliseum with 
special student-priced tickets and general 
adult ducats available. 

The dates are November 20, January 
15. February 19, and March 19. 

The first program will feature as soloist 
the renow,ned violinist Yehudi Menuhin, 
while the January concert will present the 
brilliant young pianist, Roger Pries, 16 
year old of Silver Spring. 

The third program will feature Jorge 
Bolet, Cuban pianist, in an all-Tschaikow- 
sky concert. 

The guest artist for the fourth and final 
of the series has not been announced. 

Tickets are on sale at the Hecht Com- 
pany in Silver Spring and the Record 
Shop in College Park. 



20; 



School of 



Dentistry 

^^^^^^^^^ Gardner P. H. Foley 

Captain Torres 

CAPTAIN JOSlS R. TORRES. (Dental 
'50), recently was promoted to that 
rank in the Army Dental Corps while serv- 
ing in Germany. 

Captain Torres is a member of Seventh 
Army Headquarters in Stuttgart. He en- 
tered the Army in December '50 and was 
at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, before going 
to Germany. 

Big Meeting In March 

The largest alumni meeting in the his- 
tory of the world's oldest dental school 
will be held in March of 1953. The pre- 
liminary program presented below will 
indicate the interesting features of the 
three-day session that has been arranged 
to provide returning alumni with an im- 
pressive combination of professional and 
social activities. For several months two 
committees working under the direction 
of Dr. George M. Anderson '19, represent- 
ing the alumni, and Dr. Myron S. Aisen- 
berg '22, representing the faculty of the 
School, have been engaged in the organi- 
zation of this outstanding meeting. For 
several years the alumni officers have felt 
that there was a definite need for organiz- 
ing a program that would bring hundreds 
of graduates in Dentistry to their alma 
mater for a reunion gathering that would 
meet with their highest expectations. In- 
cluded in the program will be the annual 
five-year Class Reunions and attractive 
features for the entertainment of the wives 
of the alumni. The climax of the meeting 
will be the testimonial dinner to be given 
Dr. J. Ben Robinson, in recognition of his 
many years of service to the School and to 
the profession. 

The Preliminary Program 
WEDNESD AY/MARCH 4 
Lord Baltimore Hotel 
8:30 a.m. — Mezzanine Floor 

Beginning of Alumni Registration 
9:30 a.m. — Ballroom 
Call to Order 
Dr. Harry Levin '26, President of the 
Alumni Association 
Invocation 

The Most Reverend Lawrence J. She- 
han, Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore 
Welcome 
Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of the 
University of Maryland 
Greetings 

Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg '22, Faculty 
Mr. Rudolph A. Novello '53. Presi- 
dent of the Senior Class 
10:30 a.m.— Ballroom 
"Some Aspects of Modern Dental Edu- 
cation" 
Dr. J. Ben Robinson '14, Dean of the 
School of Dentistry 
11:00 a.m. — Ballroom 
"Dentistry's Contribution to Better 
Health" 
Dr. Frank J. Houghton 17, Dean of 
the Loyola University School of 
Dentistry (New Orleans, La.) 
12:30 p.m. — Ballroom 
Luncheon for Alumni 



Speaker: Dr. H. Boyd Wylie, Dean of 
the School of Medicine 
12:30 p.m. 
Luncheon and Style Show for Ladies 
Scientific Sessions — Ballroom 
Oral Surgery: Hall A 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Dr. Daniel Lynch '25, 

Washington, D. C. 
3:30-4:30 p.m. Dr. Arthur W. Von Deilen 
'28, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Operative Dentistry: Hall B 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Dr. Zebulon V. Kendrick 

'32, Charlotte, N. C. 
3:30-4:30 p.m. Dr. Kenneth V. Randolph 

'39, Baltimore, Md. 
Radiography and Oral Diagnosis: Hall C 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Dr. Joseph C. Biddix '34, 

Baltimore, Md. 
3:30-4:30 p.m. Dr. Joseph Martini '34, 

Passaic, N. J. 
5:30 p.rn. — Cocktail Party in Honor of 
Essayists 
All Alumni Invited 
Reunion Dinners for Five-Year Classes 
1903 1928 

1908 1933 

1913 1938 

1918 1943 

1923 1948 

The reunion dinners will be arranged 
for Wednesday night by class representa- 
tives. These men will communicate with 
each member of their classes and inform 
them of reunion plans. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 5 
9:30 a.m. — School Inspection 

Exhibits in Each Department 
12:00-2:00 p.m.— Complimentary Buffet 
Luncheon 
Alumni Will Be Guests of the School 
2:15— Bus Trip to College Park 

Tour of Campus of College Park Divi- 
sion of the University 

FRIDAY, MARCH 6 
Lord Baltimore Hotel 
9:30 a.m. — Ballroom 
Call to Order 




SNAZZY, EH? 

That was an original idea of the Homecoming 
Committee to have the old timers arrive in the 
garb that was snappy in their respective under- 
graduate days. 

At the left you have Tillie Q. Outabreth 
in the very same dress, hat and gloves she 
wore the night she took part in a campus show 
and sang "Just as the Sun Went Down," with 
"Goodbye, My Bluebell" for an encore. 

At the right is Swanny P. Ortingale, in the 
get-up he wore the night he led the junior prom. 
In those days clothiers were liberal. They gave 
away a banjo with each suit. 




Baltimore 
Business Forms 

SAVE «p * 

y q of your 

TIME 




BALTIMORE Business Forms save you 
lime, save you money. Yes, their stream- 
lined designs help speed forms writing. 
Your workers save as much as two 
hours out of every six hours required for 
writing with ordinary business forms. 

Whether you want a salesbook that 
keeps your sales clerks selling instead 
of writing — or whether you want a mul- 
tiple copy form which combines in- 
voices with bills of lading, address 
labels, and accounting copies for one 
easy writing — it will pay you to make 
your next order for business forms an 
order for BALTIMORE Business Forms. 
Then you will make your records by the 
fastest, most efficient, and most eco- 
nomical methods known to the business 
world. 

Write or phone today for samples of 
business forms by BALTIMORE. 

The B altimore Salesbook (oropanu 



3120-56 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 29, Maryland 

GILMOR 8000 
TALBOT T. SPEER (Class of 1917), 

President and Genera! Manager 



21] 



-Heg Mom ! 



DON'T 

FORGET 

THE... 






Golden, Crisp, 

Crunchy Chips 

Of Corn 



CAPITOL FRITO COMPANY 

BETHESDA, MD. 




A Sign 

In Silver Spring 

This sign marks the 
location of the best 
in banking service. 



Drive-In Banking 
Service 

SH. 9000 



8701 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 




Montgomery - Stubbs 

Motors, Inc. 




miRCURY 



SALES and SERVICE 
1200 EAST WEST HIGHWAY 

Silver Spring, Maryland 
Shepherd 8040 



Dr. Harry Levin '26, President of the 
Alumni Association 
"Greater Alumni Support" 

Dr. John Michael '32, Chairman of 
the Executive Committee of the 
Alumni Association 
10:15 a.m. — Ballroom 
"Better Dental Service Through Im- 
proved Methods" 
Dr. Louis M. Cantor '21, New Haven, 
Conn. 
11:00 a.m. — Ballroom 
"Security for the Profession" 

Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23, Dean of 
the Baylor University College of 
Dentistry 
12:30 p.m. — Luncheon for Alumni 
Speaker: Dr. Noel E. Foss, Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy 

Scientific Sessions — Ballroom 
Full Denture and Fixed Partial Prosthesis: 

Hall A 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Dr. Lucian G. Coble '08, 

Greensboro, N. C. 
3:30-4:30 p.m. Dr. Ernest B. Nuttall '31, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Orthodontics and Pedodontics: Hall B 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Dr. Meyer Eggnatz '28, 

Miami Beach. Fla. 
3:30-4:30 p.m. Dr. Jason Lewis '42, Rich- 
mond, Va. 
7:00 p.m. — Ballroom 

Testimonial Dinner to Dr. J. Ben Robin- 
son '14 

In Son Diego 
Lieutenant Eugene C. Moes, (Dent '46), 
Psi Omega, is serving as a dental officer at 
the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Di- 
ego, Cal. 
He was commissioned in March of 1952. 



College of 



High School Day 

More than 6.000 high school students 
had a preview glimpse of college life as 
they visited the College Park campus as 
part of the University's third annual High 
School Day. 

Representing 147 high schools in Mary- 
land, the District of Columbia, and north- 
ern Virginia, the students were escorted 
through the campus by Maryland under- 
graduates. They were entertained at lunch- 
eon by Dr. H. C. Byrd, University presi- 
dent, and then attended the Maryland- 
Clemson game. 

This year, for the first time, each high 
school student body was accompanied by 
its faculty guidance counselors. The coun- 
selors met with Dr. Byrd in two separate 
groups. Program for guidance counselors 
had been arranged by University officials 
to further orient counselors on information 
pertinent to preparation of high school 
seniors for college study. 

Conducting the campus tours for the 
visitors were four representatives from 
each campus organization and fraternity. 

********** 
REPRIEVE 

Cable from Warsaw to a Russki in 
Washington, "Return to Russia as soon 
as possible." 

Reply from the Russki in Washington, 
"Will return in 24 hours.'' 

By return cable from Warsaw, "In view 
of your willingness to come home, you 
may stay." 



Home Economics 

— Mary Speake Humelsine 



Closs of '52 

LAST year's Home Economics gradu- 
ates are reported doing well in various 
fields. Shirley Alberts is with Hutzlers, in 
Baltimore, Mary Twilley is with Garfink- 
els. Washington, and five recent grads are 
now teaching. They are Margaret Hunt- 
ington. Helen Ridgeway. Dolores Deutsch 
Cohen, Charlotte Reeder, and Peggy 
Zirkle. 

Among those working for the govern- 
ment are Phyllis Chase and Pat Clements, 
and. at the Bureau of Human Nutrition 
and Home Economics. Nancy Fresen and 
Margaret Richards. Eileen Clark and 
Nancy Vosburgh have dietetic internships 
at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and 
New York City Hospital, respectively. 

Ann Darlington and Shirley Mularkey 
have business jobs in Baltimore, Ann with 
Joseph M. Zamoiske, Equipment Whole- 
saler, and Shirley with Detergents, Inc. 
Doris Hammond is with the Chesapeake 
and Potomac Telephone Company, Pat 
Murphy is in the Consumer Information 
Department of the DuPont Company, 
Wilmington, Delaware, and Marguerite 
Schnabel is with AVoodward and Lothrop, 
Washington. Philip Levin has become an 
assistant buyer and Vivian Yue is with an 
advertising firm in New York. 

Now working for the Extension Service 
are Charlotte Mitchell and Ella Fazzalari. 
Pat West is secretary to the Campus Wes- 
ley Foundation and a part time graduate 
student. 

Marriages and Babies 

Delores Deutsch became Mrs. O. Cohen 
on August 31. 1952, and Gene Marie 
Decker is now Mrs. C. L. Brown, living in 
College Park and teaching while her hus- 
band is in graduate school. 

Other recent brides include Martha Fort- 
ney, Janet Levelle, Susanne Miller, Doro- 
thy Ruark, Pat Morland, Rowena Creer, 
and Doris Hammann. 

Babies born to '52 graduates include 
children of Phyllis Row and Ann Kissinger 
Bartle. 

Personal Highlights 

Janet Spencer is completing her Master's 
Degree. University of Chicago. 

Maxime Saunders Bayles, Ex. '50, is 
living in Baltimore where husband Bob is 
associated with food packing. 

Sue Klosky MoMillan, Ex. '51, is with 
the Home Service Department of PEPCO. 

Rae Beer, Ex. '53, has entered the cater- 
ing business in Hagerstown. Her father 
is established in business at the Rosebowl. 

Diana Lura Puritt and husband are in 
Princeton, West Virginia where Sam works 
for the Maidenform Company. 

Roseabelle Sommers Tyler is teaching 
Math and Science in eighth grade, Mary- 
land. 

Bertie Fleet Strange has a young child 
and is making her home with her parents 
while her husband is in Korea. 

Katherine Nurgia Steinover is helping 
with Red Cross and other Defense Pro- 



[22; 



jects in Trenton, New Jersey. She has 

two children, ages 4 and 1. 

Mary E. Hynes Druckenmiller has re- 
cently moved into a newly built home. 

Sally Goddard Clauer has a new address: 
112 Paxton Road, Fall Church, Virginia 
and is a secretary in the Navy Dept. 

Barbara Neuman is a full time home- 
maker now living in Rockville. 

Caroline (Ex. '45) and Bruce Fry are in 
California where Bruce is continuing work 
on his Doctorate at Stamford University. 

In Japan 

Olive Jean Smith '44. Alpha XI Delta, 
is in Ossaka, Japan where her husband is 
stationed as Commanding Officer of a 
Camp Sakai Detachment. She took on the 
task of organizing and teaching a kinder- 
garten class which operates as a semi- 
independant unit under the direction of 
the American schools Principal. She re- 
ports a visit from Housemother Mary 
Anderson of Alpha Delta who traveled to 
Japan to visit her husband. 

At Camp Haugen, Japan 

Amy R. Heckinger (Home Ec '50), De- 
partment of Army civilian employee, has 
been assigned as program director for the 
post service club at Camp Haugen, Japan. 

She recently had been in Korea where 
she helped stage shows for front line troops. 

Miss Heckinger has been in Japan since 
August 1950. Until recently she was a 
service club recreation director in Tokvo. 




Dean Stamp 



Dean Stamp Returns 

Dean of Women Adele Stamp, recently 
returned from a summer tour of the Euro- 
pean countries. 
During her visit in Vienna, Miss Stamp 
was not allowed to 
visit various points of 
interest in this city 
which is two-thirds 
under Russian occu- 
pation. Among these 
were the Danube 
River and the indus- 
trial zones. 

Miss Stamp at- 
tended the convoca- 
tion where the TJni- 
ftfff, versify presented Gen- 
eral Matthew B. 
Ridgway, supreme 
commander of Europe, with an honorary 
degree. 

Miss Stamp found Vienna to be both 
beautiful and disheartening. It was easy 
to tell when she left the Allied zones and 
entered the Russian sector by the extreme 
poverty in the latter. 

In Paris at the Louvre, Miss Stamp wit- 
nessed a spotlight display on Greek and 
Roman statues. 

While in England, she visited the Ca- 
thedral in Winchester, built in 642. The 
Cathedral's prep school was started by 
Henry VIII. 

The most surprising event of Dean 
Stamp's tour occurred when she was shown 
Roman coins discovered when the grounds 
around Winchester were dug up and turned 
into farms. 

*********** 

INTELLIGENCE 

Intelligence is the ability to solve the 
problems oj life. 




CLEAN • DEPENDABLE 
FAST • ECONOMICAL 



operate, less to 



maintain. 



WASHINGTON 

Rosslyn Gas Company • Serving Virginia 



LIGHT COMPANY 

Washington Gas Lijht Company of Maryland, Int. 



WASHINGTON WOODWORKING 
COMPANY, INC. 

"Tailors of the Woodivorking Industry 
CUSTOM MADE 

BOOKCASES PANELLING PARTITIONS 

STORE FIXTURES DISPLAY CASES 

CABINETS FOR HOME, OFFICE, INSTITUTIONS 

FURNITURE TO SPECIFICATIONS 

PHONE: NAtionol 5624 

912 — 4th STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 




23] 



THE QUADRANGLE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK 





.47 Dancgger Foto 



A HOUSE OF PRAYER FOR ALL PEOPLE" 



Interior view of the New Memorial Chapel, University of Maryland, during Dedication Exercises. 



CHAPEL DEDICATION 

{Continued from page 2) 
guidance; for their moral and spiritual 
development that they may thus hope for 
the noblest attainments in manhood and 
womanhood. 

"I dedicate this building to the Faculty 
of the University of Maryland that they, 
collectively and as individuals, may use 
it as an example of the high purpose of 
this University, the ultimate objective for 
which the building has been erected," 
Judge Cole went on to say, addressing 
the faculty. 

The Only Way 

"To the people of Maryland and to the 
people of the United States," Judge Cole 
concluded in addressing the audience, "I 
dedicate this building, that it shall serve 
always to keep uppermost in their minds 
the thought that, in the finality, the way 
of God is the only way, and that service 
to their fellowmen here or in other parts 
of the world, is the true spirit of religious 
effort." 

The audience response was, "We, the 
people of Maryland and of t he United 
States, accept with humble mind and 
spirit the responsibilities which the words 
of the dedication of this building place 
upon us. that all of us may work for the 
purpose of righteousness and for the ex- 
tension of the Kingdom of God." 

"In turning over control of the Chapel, 
Chairman Cole addressed the Chaplains, 
"In erecting this building, in loving 
remembrance of those who died in defense 
of their country, who gave their lives 
to protect principles of freedom under a 
just God. and in the hope that it would 
help all of us to attain blessed immortality, 
it was not the intention of the University 
to establish the same course of worship 



for all, but instead to give all Churches 
opportunity to work for the betterment 
of their own flocks. Therefore, the Board 
will place authority for the management 
of this Chapel in the Chaplains and in the 
Religious Life Committee of the Univers- 
ity, subject, of course, to the authority of 
the Board of Regents, and the Board's 
Executive Officer, the President of the 
University. I hand the key to this build- 
ing, with the charge that the Chaplains 
shall allow no services, no functions of 
any kind, within the sacred precincts of 
these walls except services that are 
basically religious and have as their 
objectives the extension of the Kingdom 
of God, and, thereby, service to all man- 
kind. 

The Chaplains responded. "Representing 
the Chaplains of various Church denomi- 
nations on the campus of the University 
of Maryland, we accept completely the 
charge so solemnly given us. and pledge 
ourselves that this building shall be set 
apart for the worship of Almighty God 
and for no other purpose. We shall set 
it apart to the glory of God the Father, 
for the worship of God in prayer and 
praise; for strength for those who are 
tempted; for the hallowing of family life; 
for teaching and guiding our youth ; as a 
bond of brotherhood for all men; and for 
extension of the Kingdom of God. We 
ask that all present join in prayer as 
evidence of our faith and trust in this 
promise." 

Corillonic Bells 

Prior to the inspiring address by the 
Governor, and Judge Cole's dedicatory 
remarks, Dr. Alexander McCurdy, Direc- 
tor of the Curtis School of Music in 
Philadelphia, presented an hour recital 
during which he played the Carillonic 
Bells, and the three manual pipe organ. 



Communion Service 

in University Chapel 

designed by 

Henry Powell Hopkins, Jr. 

STUDIO 

Henry Powell Hopkins, Jr. 

hand wrought jewelry 

and silver remodeling 

and repairing 

1111 Love grove Alley 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

Plaza 6196 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

* Established 1859 * 

Crashed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 
Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Frederick 1820-1821-2000 

Buckeystown 3511 



Colonial Hardwood 
Flooring Co., Inc. 



Manufacturers of Colonial 
Brand Appalachian Oak 
Flooring - Church Furniture 
- Store Fixtures - Window 
Units Completely Set up - 
Special Millwork of Every 
Description. Kitchen Cabi- 
nets Custom-Built and Fac- 
tory Finished. 



PHONE HAGERSTOWN 5835 
511 W. Washington St., Hagerstown 




25 



"An organ breathes in every groove; 
And the full heart's a Psalter 
Rich in deep hymn of gratitude and love." 
HOOD— ODE TO RAE WILSON 

The beautiful organ music in Maryland's new 
chapel is provided by a three manual 
Moller pipe organ. This, and every Moller organ 
is built by master craftsmen — unexcelled in 
their field. When your church needs an organ 
remember the name — Moller. 

For information and demonstration, please u>rite: 




INCORPORATED 

Renowned for Pipe Organs Since 1875 

HAGERSTOWN. MARYLAND 



Cooperating with the 

Agriculture Department 



of the 



University of Maryland 



FOUR STATES LIVESTOCK, INC. 



Hagerstown, Maryland 



DANZER 

METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE 1818 



T. EDGIE RUSSELL 



General Contractor 



FREDERICK, MARYLAND 




MUSIC MASTERS 

Dr. Alexander McCurdy, left, Director of the 
Curtis School of Music, Philadelphia, who ini- 
tiated the Chapel's carillonic bells as well as 
the three manual pipe organ during the Chapel's 
dedication exercises. 

With Professor Arthur L. Bigelow, right, at 
the console the music of the bells again rolled 
across the Maryland campus on the occasion of 
the Navy-Maryland football classic. Professor 
Bigelow is Bellmaster at Princeton University. 



Following the recital, the well-known 
Curtis School director played the Pro- 
cessional music. 

Following the processional, the invoca- 
tion was read by James T. Bard, Chaplain 
for Methodist Students. It was then that 
the newly formed University of Maryland 
Chapel Choir of 120 voices sang the 
beautiful hymn which formally com- 
menced the Call to Worship for the dedi- 
cation services. The choir continued its 
debut in hymn, after which Meyer Green- 
berg, Chaplain for the Jewish Students, 
presented the Bible Reading from the 
Book of Isaiah. The Song of Dedication 
was sung by Fague K. Springmann, as- 
sociate professor of music at Maryland 
and director of the choir. 

The remainder of the dedication pro- 
gram saw Judge Cole's charge to the 
chaplains, presentation of the song "Mary- 
land My Maryland" by the choir and its 
response, "My Country 'Tis of Thee" by 
the audience, and the benediction by F. R. 
Keane O.F.M., Chaplain for the Catholic 
Students. The Recessional also was played 
by Dr. McCurdy. 

"Why is it . . . ?" 

The story behind the building of the 
Memorial Chapel started several years 
ago when Marshall Heaps of Harford 
country, then a member of the Maryland 
General Assembly, asked the pertinent 
question, "Why is it that the University 
can spend millions for training for this 
short life, and cannot spend a little to 
build a chapel to educate men and women 
for eternity?" 

There could be only one answer to such 
a question. Those interested in the Uni- 
versity immediately began to make plans. 
Students petitioned the Board of Regents. 
The Farm Bureau took up the matter. 
The Federation of Women's Clubs; the 
Home Demonstration Clubs, throughout 
the State, all began work. Then along 
came an alumnus, Mr. Mahlon Haines of 
York, Pennsylvania, with this remark to 
the President of the University, "I under- 
stand you are planning to build a Chapel. 
I want to be the first one to donate toward 
it. Here's my check book. Fill in the 
check and I will sign it." 
The project was discussed with the then 



261 



Governor Lane, and his approval obtained. 
Plans were developed for financing, after 
which the Board of Regents and the Board 
of Public Works gave their approval for 
construction to begin; and in the early 
spring of 1951 the Chapel was under way. 
No State appropriation was asked or 
received for the construction of this build- 
ing. The University had surpluses in the 
years following the war which arose en- 
tirely from the large influx of students 
and a greater income therefrom than was 
expected. Instead of committing this in- 
come to continuing obligations, the Board 
of Regents, with the approval of the Board 
of Public Works, decided to use this in- 
come, coming largely from students as it 
did, for the construction of certain projects 
devoted to student interests, but for which 
the University felt it should not ask the 
State for appropriations. This Chapel is 
one of the results of this policy. 

Three Chapels 

The building actually contains three 
Chapels. The main Chapel is constructed 
largely for the general use of the Christian 
faiths. It seats 1350. A small Chapel in 
the rear seats 122, constructed mainly for 
use by non-Christian faiths. The third 
place of worship is a small Chapel of the 
Blessed Sacrament, seating 44, and con- 
structed entirely for those of the Catholic 
faith. In addition to the three Chapels, 
there are two dressing rooms for the 
Choir, ten offices for the Chaplains, a 
reception room, a conference room, and 
another room in which vestments and 
other equipment for the Chapel are kept. 

The pews in the main chapel and the 
chapel in the rear are pure white trimmed 
in oak. The altar is set in a curved niche 
arched by the ceiling of the niche, ap- 
proximately 60 feet high. Located in the 
balcony are the new organ and controls 
for the Carillonic Bells. 

The University now has on the campus 
nine Chaplains representing as many dif- 
ferent denominations. These Chaplains 
have the cooperation of the University in 
the development of their own religious 
work as it relates to their particular de- 
nomination. The University will not 
sponsor general University chapel services, 
at which people of all faiths would be 
expected to be in attendance, except for 
such non-denominational services as may 
seem appropriate for special occasions. The 
University is turning over to the Chaplains 
the management of the Chapel for holding 
of such separate services as each denomi- 
nation may wish, or for holding of such 
services in combination as any group of 
denominations may determine to be 
fruitful. 

Various Gifts 

The University has received gifts for 
the installation in the Chapel of certain 
special equipment and projects. The 
Homemakers of the State, women who 
are organized in Home Demonstration 
Clubs under the University of Maryland 
Home Economics Extension Service, made 
a large gift, $15,000, to the University for 
the installation of the Carillonic Bells. 
There are two sets of these bells. One set, 
Flemish bells with 61-notes, must be 
played on a console much like an organ; 
the other, a 25-note set of English bells, 




Wa 




"CARILLONIC BELLS" 

GRACE THE TOWER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CHAPEl 

This carillon installation gives the listening ear all the per- 
fectly balanced and accurately matched tones of the carillon 
bells of Flanders with a 61-note Flemish-type instrument, 
played manually. In addition, a 25-note English-type instru- 
ment, equipped with automatic controls, will be used to play 
college tunes at predetermined hours. 

In whatever program planned for their use the bells will lift 
the hearts of those who hear, adding spiritual tone to the 
campus. 

An exclusive product of 

SCHULMERICH CARILLONS, INC., Carrillon Hill, SELLERS VILLE, PA. 



r 




WHEN THE CAMPUS "HERO 

looked like this . . . 

Western Maryland Dairy was serving 
Baltimore with fine dairy products. 



>AIRY PRODUCTS 



WESTERN MARYLAND DAIRY 

Division of National Dairy Products Corp. 



[27; 



Nine Advantages of 
Washington Permanent 

Home Loans 

LOW RATES— EASY PAYMENTS 

LONG TIME TO PAY 

INTEREST REDUCED MONTHLY 

LIBERAL REPAYMENT 

PROMPT SERVICE 

DEAL WITH LOCAL PEOPLE 

EXPERT COUNSEL— NO RED TAPE 

We welcome your inquiry 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 
INVITED 

LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 

\\ashinqtori. urmanznt 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

Carl J. Bergmann, President 

629 F STREET, N. W. 

Established 1881 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 5753 



STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS 

ORNAMENTAL IRON • ALUMINUM 

STAINLESS STEEL • BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

P. H. OTTO, Prop. 

DUponf 7550-7551 



will play automatically. The English bells 
are also attached to the pipe organ to be 
played in conjunction with the organ. 
The Schulmerich Company of Sellersville, 
Pennsylvania, manufacturer of Carillonic 
Bells, installed the bells at actual cost and 
without profit to itself. 

The pipe organ is a three-manual in- 
strument built by the Moller Company of 
Hagerstown. The Moller Company con- 
structed this organ and installed it at 
actual cost and without profit. 

The new organ contains 2,003 pipes. 
These are distributed over the three key- 
boards played by hand and another played 
by the feet. A total of 29 voices and 31 
ranks of pipes is included in the instrument 
and are playable by means of 42 stop 
controls. 

The Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament 
was constructed largely with funds given 
to the University by Mr. Thomas Pang- 
born of Hagerstown. Mr. Pangborn has 
long been a friend of the University and 
is one of the most prominent Catholic 
laymen in the State. 

A beautiful and elaborate Communion 
Set has been given to the Chapel by Mr. 
Henry Powell Hopkins, Architect who 
designed the building. 

Combined Design 

The design of the Service is Swedish 
modern and colonial, skillfully combined 
to conform to the architecture of the 
Chapel. Mr. Hopkins shaped the various 
pieces of the Service from circular discs 
of silver, using a hammer and anvil instead 
of stamping them in the modern manner. 
Approximately 315 man hours were de- 
voted to making the three pieces — the 
Wine Flagon, the Communion Cup, and 
the Paten. 

Mahlon Haines donated funds originally 
for the purchase of a good deal of the 
religious equipment and since has taken 
a leading role among the alumni, with 
another large donation himself, to provide 
proper landscaping and walks for the 
Bishop's garden in the rear of the Chapel. 

The Graduating Class of 1951 contrib- 
uted a substantial sum to the purchase 
of equipment. 

The beautiful Carillonic bells were heard 
again Saturday, October 18, when Pro- 
fessor Arthur L. Bigelow, Bellmaster of 
Princeton University, performed prior to 
the Maryland-Navy football classic. 

Sez Testudineite: 

\kJEDDING rings 
seem to last longer 
when soaked in dish- 
water . . . Prosperity 
makes friends; pov- 
erty l< sis them ... Life 
is a measure to be 
filled, not a cup to be 
drained . . . Imitate 
the pin. Its head keeps 
it from going too jar 
. . . Knowledge comes 
but wisdom lingers. 
You can eat your cake 
and have it too, pro- 
vided you have two 

cakes. ... A grumbler is a fellow who finds 

fault and hates to relinquish it. 




VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



William F. Nelson 
BRICK WORK 

Phone: TUckerman 2290 

3817 - 14th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

MATS: Any Sixe — Any Quantity 

24 Hour Service 
STEREOTYPES: Complete Blocking and 

Mortising Facilities 
MAILING: Addressing, Packaging 

1428 YOU STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 9, D.C. NOrth 1249 



28 



Champion 



Barbara Ann Riggs, world champion 
dairy judge, again showed her champion- 
ship talents when she received highest in- 
dividual honors in the National Inter-Col- 
legiate judging contest at Waterloo, Iowa. 

Miss Riggs, 20-year-old junior in animal 
husbandry, gained the title of world's 
champion dairy judge when she placed 
first among the individuals in competition 
in Europe last year. 

While at Cambridge, England. Miss 
Riggs as highest individual scorer, received 
from the Queen Mother Elizabeth the 
$1,500 gold cup that is presented annually 
to the team placing first. She also partici- 
pated in a tour of the Channel Islands, 
Scotland, Holland, Switzerland, France, 
and Germany. The tour was financed for 
her by the 4-H club of Maryland. 

In addition to her work in the dairy 
field, she maintains a 3.4 scholastic aver- 
age and several activities. These include 
membership in Alpha Lambda Delta, 
freshman women's honorary, the 4-H club, 
freshman orientation committee, and pres- 
ident of Alpha Chi Omega. 

Miss Riggs' interest in livestock origi- 
nated when her parents bought a farm in 
Gaithersburg, and she began to groom and 
show the family's cattle at local shows. 
From there she went into the local 4-H 
club and has been a member for the past 
seven years. 

Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club, of 100-voices, 
newly organized this year under Dr. West- 
ervelt Romaine, distinguished organist and 
musical leader presented a program of 
religious, spiritual and school songs at 
the Alumni Homecoming banquet. 

The program included "Break Forth, O 
Beauteous, Heavenly Light," by Bach; 
''Let Us Break Bread Together," a Negro 
spiritual, and "Invictus," by Bruno Huhn. 

A medley of University songs consisted 
of the "Victory Song," the "Drinking 
Song," "Sons of Old Maryland" and the 
"Alma Mater." 

The "Alma Mater," which was also sung 
at the Fall Convocation, is a new arrange- 
ment by Dr. Romaine. 

The Glee Club already has plans for the 
coming year which include a concert at 
Townsend High School in November and 
presentation of the "Testament of Free- 
dom" in conjunction with the Buffalo Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. 

• • I r * If* *••••• 

GEOGRAPHY 

Since Lincoln was shot we might not 
get away with this, an outgrowth oj the 
geographic oldie, "If Mississippi allowed 
Missouri to wear her New Jersey, what 
icould Delaware?" The answer ivas, "Ida- 
ho. Alaska." Well, Annie Howe, two guys 
were standing in the Norway of a restau- 
rant and made like this: "Hawaii! You 
Hungary?" "Yes, Siarn." "Lemme Russia 
to a table and I'll Fiji." "0. K., but if 
there's too much Greece on the Turkey 
call the Bosphorus or we will not Rumania. 
I wonder if a man could get a Sardinia?" 
"Corsican!" "Ask the waiter to Sweden 
my coffee; Denmark my bill." Soviet Chile 
and left with a cheery "Abyssinia Samoa." 



Even A Baby Knows — 

KOONTZ 

DAIRY 

PRODUCTS 




Are Really 

• EXTRA RICH 

• EXTRA NOURISHING 

• EXTRA DELICIOUS 



KOONTZ 




GOLDEN 
GUERNSEY MILK 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

KENNERSLEY FARM DAIRY 

ON THE EASTERN SHORE OF MARYLAND 



M<3SuflcuHd'l fyin&it 




RICE'S STAR BREAD 

Popular — because it's QoodL! 



CRISFIELD, MARYLAND 



[29] 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

WHERE YOU SAVE UP TO 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 
1016 Blodensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears Roebuck) 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 6478 



Searing 
AHahit 



Save for need- 
Save for fun! 

Get into the habit of add- 
ing a part of your salary 
to your account each pay 
day. 

There is no substitute for 
a savings reserve. 

District 2370 

FIRST F€D€Rfll 
SflVMGS^flSS'D 

610 13th St. N.W. (bet. F & G) 



Not Connected With Any Other 
Federal Association 



USE THIS COUPON 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of WASHINGTON 
610 13th Street, N.W. I bet. F 6 G) 
Woshington 5, D. C. 



Inclosed is check for $ 

to open a Savings Account . . . OR — 
Please send information about Savings 
Service □ 

Name 



Street Phone 

City State... 



FOR A COLLEGE EDUCATION 
MAKE IT MARYLAND 

(Continued from page 4) 
coin, like others who did not enjoy the 
privilege of a college education, empha- 
sized its value and importance. 

However, not only America's leaders, but 
earlier men of great minds have ever 
stressed the value of education. Confucius 
is credited with, "Ignorance is the night of 
the mind, but a night without moon or 
star." 

"Ignorance is the curse of God ; knowl- 
edge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven," 
wrote Shakespeare. 

Disraeli said, "To be conscious that you 
are ignorant is a great step to knowledge." 

Do not sell a college education short. The 
contributions toward teaching, as urged by 
Horace Mann, are reflected in a recent quo- 
tation from Barnard College, 

Do not sell it short 

"Never take your college education for 
granted. A lot of people have broken their 
hearts to give it to you." 

"Education," wrote John Ruskin, "does 
not mean teaching people what they do not 
know. It means teaching them to behave 
as they do not behave. It is not teaching 
the youth the shapes of the letters and the 
tricks of numbers, and then leaving them 
to turn their arithmetic to roguery and 
their literature to lust. It means, on the 
contrary, training them into the perfect ex- 
ercise and kingly continence of their bodies 
and souls. It is a painful, continual and 
difficult work to be done by kindness, by 
watching, by warning, by precedent, and by 
praise, but above all — by example." 

"A man must carry knowledge with him," 
wrote Samuel Johnson, "If he would bring 
home knowledge." 

In particular, never sell a University of 
Maryland education short. Columnist Bill 
Cunningham, of the Boston Herald, wrote, 
"I'll simply say that if you're looking for a 
good place to have your children given a 
sane, well-balanced and thoroughly Ameri- 
can education, write for the catalogs of the 
University of Maryland." 

This is excellent advice. 

Opinion from Yale 

About state universities generally, the 
President of Yale University made the fol- 
lowing statement : 

"It is not my business especially to em- 
phasize the magnificent services of the 
state universities; but it is important to 
note that they have been very great and 
that, by and large, instead of being con- 
trolled by politics, these institutions have 
applied a good bit of education to the poli- 
ticians; that their contributions to the 
higher learning are of the first order; that 
their influence in the educational world is 
steadily increasing. This is due in part, per- 
haps, to the vast budgets of which in re- 
cent years they have disposed. But only in 
part. They have won their position by 
reason of their sense of responsibility for 
the welfare of the community." 

While the basic function of the State of 
Maryland's university is to afford the best 
available educational facilities for the 
people of that state, the reputation of the 
University of Maryland has penetrated to 
all sections of the world as witness the 1951 



Westminster 

^^ SHOE ^^ 

Company, Inc 



WESTMINSTER 
MARYLAND 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest and Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative. 

Feeds • Seeds • Fertilizer 

Limestone 

Petroleum Products 

Frederick 1077-277-1177 

Thurmont 3111 

Middletown No. 6 

Main Office 

25 E. SOUTH STREET 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



Phones 
Frederick 877 Middletown 109-R 

J. VERNON COBLENTZ 

Insurance Of All Kinds 
9 N. COURT ST. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone FREDERICK 1034 
FREDERICK, MD. 



EBERT'S 

Famous 
ICE CREAM 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



30 



graduating class with 99 foreign born stu- 
dents. 

"Your University has built for itself a 
reputation acknowledged far beyond the 
borders of the State of Maryland and the 
United States, of deep interest and valu- 
able participation in fulfilling the world 
task," said Dr. Willem Drees, Prime Min- 
ister of the Netherlands. 

"Prior to 1920 the position of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in the educational 
pattern of our state was useful but incon- 
spicuous," reported the Marbury Commis- 
sion, which recently made a survey of edu- 
cational institutions in Maryland, "and to- 
day it holds the limelight to such a degree 
that the glare tends to make us unable to 
see how great has been the accomplishment. 
Your Commission ventures to believe that 
many people will learn with some surprise 
that the College Park schools of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, measured by the 
standards customarily applied in surveys 
of this character, rank well above the aver- 
age of similar institutions elsewhere. The 
facts set forth in Chapter V of the report 
of our survey staff seems to make it clear 
that we have in the University of Mary- 
land an institution which can hold up its 
head among state universities of greater 
age and larger financial resources. This is 
an accomplishment in which the state can 
take legitimate pride." 

Maryland Survey 

The Committee on Education of the 
House of Delegates of the Maryland Gen- 
eral Assembly conducted a survey and 
among other statements, reported to the 
Legislature as follows: 

"From the observation of the operation 
of the University of Maryland, and a com- 
parison of operations of other State Uni- 
versities, the Committee concludes that the 
Administration of the University of Mary- 
land, considering the tightly controlled ad- 
ministrative authority, is being efficiently 
operated and deserves the commendation 
and confidence of the Legislature and the 
people of Maryland." 

"The building of the University of Mary- 
land is an outstanding achievement in 
American education, one almost, perhaps 
quite, without parallel," wrote Dr. Gerald 
W. Johnson, noted author and feature 
writer, Baltimore Sun, "taking into consid- 
eration both the magnitude of the opera- 
tion and the speed with which it was done." 

As parents and youngsters consider a 
college education for the latter, more and, 
in ever increasing numbers, are saying, 
"Make it MARYLAND !" 

FACULTY CHANGES 
(Continued from page 13) 
the Air Science faculty. New members 
of the English Department are Marie J. 
Henault, John L. Bradley, Robert H. 
Goldsmith, Robert E. Lovelace, Daniel E. 
Neville, Harold Orel, and Robert M. 
Pierson. New members of the Mathe- 
matics Department are Benjamin Cato, 
Jr., Elizabeth Cuthill, Heron S. Collins, 
Charles W. McArthur, Jacqueline Penez, 
David M. Young. Jr., and of the History 
Department. Joseph 0. Baylen, William 
Harbaugh, and Chester C. Kaiser. Edward 
Benter III, Herbert R. Gillis, and James 
K. Potter have joined the Speech De- 
partment faculty. 



FASANKO MOTORS 

YOUR CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DEALER 




UNION 8700 



COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

Bladensburg Maryland 



S 



ELLERS 

ALES & SERVICE 

Before you buy — see the new DeSoto 

oDeS^oto 
f-^lumoutn 

6228 BALTIMORE AVE. 

RIVERDALE, MD. 

P. A. Sellers WArfield 6000 




(JSurch r^ealtu cf 
insurance 

SPECIALIZING IN 
HOMES & HOME SITES 

NEAR MARYLAND "U" 

TOwer 4747 
8505 Baltimore Blvd. 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



SALES 



^fVrcl 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3110 Hamilton St. 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

Phone WArfield 0900 



MARYLAND TELEPHONE 

Answering Secretarial Service 

218 Professional Building 

APPLETON 1500 

Hyattsville, Maryland 



FOLLIN'S 

Sales and Service 

UNion 1500 College Park, Md. 



PHONE TOWER 5100 B. SUGRUE '34 

NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY 



SALES ^ ^ SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



[31] 



College of 



Business 
and Public 
Administration 

i^ Egbert F. Tingley '27 



In Stuttgart 

PVT. EDWIN L. WILSON, who at- 
tended B&PA '48 to '51, has been as- 
signed to the 321st Signal Battalion at 
Stuttgart, Germany. 

Part of the VII Corps, the battalion is 
receiving intensive field training with other 
elements of the NATO Army. 

Wilson was employed by the National 
Research Council at Washington, D. C. 
before entering the Army. 

At Wright-Patterson 

1st Lt. Walter D. Scheuch, Jr. (BPA 
'48). Phi Delta Theta is Auditing Officer 
with the U. S. Air Force at Wright-Pat- 
terson Air Force 
Base, Ohio. Prior to 
his assignment at 
Wright-Patterson, Lt. 
Scheuch served at Mit- 
chel Air Force Base. 
New York, as Fiscal 
Accountant and as 
Base Comptroller at 
Clinton County Air 
Force Base, Wilming- 
ton, Ohio. 

During World War 
II. Lt. Scheuch served 
as pilot and Flight 
Commander with the Fourth Emergency 




Lt. Scheuch 




AIDE-DE-CAMP 

First Lieutenant Neil J. Emrich (right), BPA 
'50, Phi Delta Theta, has been made an Aide- 
de-Camp to Major General Thomas L. Harrold 
(left), Commanding General of the Japan Logis- 
tical Command. 

Lieutenant Emrich entered the Army in March, 
1951. With the 1st Cavalry Division in Korea, 
he saw front line action on Old Baldy hill. 



Rescue Squadron in the Pacific. Asiatic- 
Pacific Theater Ribbon with four battle 
stars, the Air Medal, he was recommended 
for the Distinguished Flying Cross and 
Silver Star. 

Lt. Scheuch was associated with the real 
estate firm of Frederick W. Berens, Inc. 
Upon return to civilian life, he will join 
the real estate firm of Hackman-Scheuch. 
Inc. He is a member of the Washington. 
D. C. Junior Chamber of Commerce. 

Heads Business Organization 

Dr. John H. Frederick, professor of trans- 
portation and foreign trade, since 1946, 
was appointed head of the university's de- 
partment of business organization. 

THREE OF THE DORMITORIES FOR MEN 

Dorms M, G, and H, Located on the Range 



The new department head replaced Dr. 
Lionel W. Thatcher, who left the post to 
assume a similar position at Wisconsin. 

Dr. Frederick is a well-known authority 
in the many fields of transportation and 
marketing, and is the author of many texts 
and articles on these subjects. He recently 
returned from a month's speaking tour in 
the far west. 

Prior to Maryland, Dr. Frederick served 
for eight years as professor of transporta- 
tion and industry, F/niversity of Texas. 

Francis Brown '51 

Francis N. Brown '51, is now associated 
with the National Assoc, of Refrigerated 
Warehouses, as Public Relations Assistant 
to the Executive Vice-President. 



In Mexico 

The 1952 budget for national education 
amounts to 450 million pesos, which is 
twice as much as the education budget for 
1947, when the present administration took 
over. During these six years the number 
of teachers has increased to 10 thousand 
teachers. At the moment, in Mexico City 
1097 schools are in operation with an en- 
rollment of 500 thousand students. Educa- 
tional-Welfare now provides for 22 
thousand boarders at a cost of 41 million 
pesos, with a rations budget of over 16 
million pesos and scholarships amounting 
to 3 million pesos. Total expenditures on 
construction and repairing of school build- 
ings amount of 271 million pesos. The 
construction of the University City has 
progressed to the completion of the build- 
ings of the National Schools of Commerce, 
Administration. Engineering, Science and 
the Rectory. Other buildings are under 
construction. In accordance with the Anti- 
Illiteracy Campaign, 269,746 persons have 
been taught to read and write. 




••-* 



■ 




College of : 



SMOKY HAS COMPANY 

First Lt. Donald L. "Smoky" Pierce, (A&S '50), assistant public information officer of the 40th 
Division in Korea, receives the thanks of Mayor Oh Hyung Keun for his assistance in a local 
problem. The presidents of three local women's clubs look on. The Maryland lieutenant is co- 
ordinator between the military and civilian officials building a school building in the Mayor's 
town, someplace in Korea. The 40th Division is constructing the building with the assistance of 
Korean nationals. Lieutenant Pierce was recalled to active duty in August 1950, and has been in 
Korea since last May. He is a veteran of World War II. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
U. Pierce, Beltsville. 

_^____^_ — — — ——- "Lake Como at Evening" 

"Church at Celerina" 
Shirley Kaplan 

"Young Love" 
Earle Goodenow 

"Landscape" 
Hedy Giger 

"Magnolias" 
Yovan Radenkovitch 

"Marine Landscape" 
Frederick J. Mulhaupt, A.N .A. 
"Sunshine and Shadows" 
"Autumn Landscape" 
James P. Wharton 

"Filipino Girl" 
J. Bende 

"Dancer" 
The second major art exhibition of the 
fall season featured selected paintings from 
members of the Baltimore Cooperative 
Artists Organization. 

The exhibition included works by Mr. 
and Mrs. Leonard M. Bahr. Charles P. 
Cross. Sarah P. Camthers. William G. 
Evans. Mildred G. Knipp, Mrs. John W. 
Parsons, and Professor James P. Wharton. 

Don Erlbeck Wins 

Don Erlbeck, senior in advertising, has 
been awarded a $150 first prize in a na- 
tional television cabinet design contest, 
according to Professor Vienna Curtiss of 
the practical art department. 

Erlbeck won in the traditional class. He 
also submitted designs in contemporary 
and French Provincial classes. 



Arts and Sciences 

^^^^^^^^ Lois Eld Ernest '38 

Art Exhibit 

HE Department of Art, (Colonel 
James P. Wharton), opened its first ex- 
hibition of the fall 
semester with a dis- 
play of oil paintings 
loaned to the Depart- 
ment through the 
courtesy of Mr. Her- 
bert M. Brune, Jr., 
President of the Art 
Foundation, Inc. of 
Maryland. Artists rep- 
resented, with the 
titles of their works, 
Col. Wharton include: 

John Barber 

"Coast" 
August Cueni 

"Swiss Village Street" 
Phillippe Noyer 
"Boy with Blue Horse" 
"Little Man Listening to the Silence" 
Walter Farndon. X.A. 

"Peggy's Cove" 
Maurice de Vlaminck 

"Eglise en Bretagne" 
Wanda J. Milbourne 
"Delphiniums" 
"Lotus Flowers" 




J. HOWARD FRENCH 

for the Best 

Seeds Fertilizer 

Bulbs Insecticides 

Garden Equipment 

Baltimore Pike, Route 1 
Lima, Pa. 



r 
^Uniforms 

— for Doctors, Nurses, Labo- 
ratory Technicians. Also Indus- 
trial and Domestic Uniforms. 

Franklin 

UNIFORM CO. 

In Baltimore: 235 Pork Avenue 

In Washington: 906 Eleventh St., N.W. 
We Deliver! 



WHITMAN, REQUARDT 
& ASSOCIATES 

Engineers * Consultants 

Civil — Sanitary — Structural 
Mechanical — Electrical 

Reports, Plans, 
Supervision, Appraisals 

1304 ST. PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



r~ 



ALC AZ AR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 
Phone VErnon 8400 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT ST. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



KERR'S POTATO CHIPS 

Made in Baltimore 
By 

DAVID KERR, INC. 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 
Baltimore, Md. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



33 ! 



Furr Bros. 
Poultry Co., Inc. 

Washington's 
Leading Purveyors 

HOTEL RESTAURANT 

INSTITUTIONAL SERVICE 

Phone: NAtional 4792 

1317 MAINE AVE., S.W. 
WASHINGTON 4, D.C. 



J 


, NICHOLS 




— WHOLESALE- 




FANCY 




FRUITS & 




PRODUCE 




Franklin 4888 


UNION MARKET TERMINAL 


1278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



THOMAS SOMMERVILLE CO. 

Plumbing, ana J4 eating. 
Supplied 

Main Store and Office: 

First and N Sts., N. E. 
Washington, D. C. 

Terra Cotta Branch: 

Sixth and Decatur Sts., N. E. 
Washington, D. C. 

Annapolis Branch: 

Bladen and Calvert Sts. 



ART METAL 
FINISHING CO. 

GOLD AND SILVER PLATING 
ANTIQUES REPAIRED & RESTORED 

923- 12th Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 1326 




The cabinet is a floor console model 
which accommodates a TV set, radio, and 
phonograph. It is being considered for 
manufacture by a California corporation. 

Erlbeck is president of the senior class 
and editor of the 1953 Terrapin. 

With Lederle Lobs 

Frederick L. Bach, Jr., (A&S '43), presi- 
dent of his class, is now an organic research 
chemist at Lederle Laboratories, Pearl 
River, N. Y. Fred, 
who was a leader in 
many campus activi- 
ties and a member of 
the football, boxing, 
and track teams, has 
been with Lederle 
since 1949. He was a 
member of the re- 
search team which de- 
veloped the new anti- 
tuberculosis drug, Al- 
dinamide. The day 
after his graduation 
from Maryland, where 
he was a Sigma Nu and a member of 
O.D.K., Fred entered the Army, later serv- 
ing as a combat infantry officer with Pat- 
ton's Third Army during which time he 
was awarded the Distinguished Service 
Cross. He is married to the former Ronnie 
Doyno, A&S '43. They live in Pearl River 
and have a four-year-old daughter. 

From Europe 

Dr. Adolph E. Zucker, head of the For- 
eign Languages department, returned to 
College Park after spending the last two 
years in Europe as head of the European 
program. 
Dr. Zucker was highly impressed with 
over 5000 students 
from the armed 
services and said 
that the work of 
the university is 
very highly appre- 
ciated. 

While in Eu- 



Mr. Bach 




Dr. Zucker 



rope, Dr. Zucker 
took sabbatical 
leave to Paris and 
Munich, collecting 
material for a book 
on history of the 
German theater. 
A manuscript 
"America and the 
Deutschland" has already gone to the pub- 
lishers. 

Successor to Dr. Zucker is Dr. Edmund 
E. Miller, who was formerly head of gradu- 
ate work in Paris and Munich. Also in 
Europe assisting in the program is Dr. 
Augustus J. Prahl, who previously headed 
the German department at College Park. 

Newly Commissioned 

Vincent L. Glorioso, Jr.. who attended 
the College of Arts and Sciences from 
'47 to '51, was recently commissioned an 
Army second lieutenant following his 
graduation from the Fort Riley Officer 
Candidate School. 

He received instruction in leadership, 
combat tactics, supply economy and Army 
history, and will now attend a specialty 
school in preparation for field service. 




Dr. Lejins 



From Germany 

A group of seven young German penolo- 
gists are at the University for a year's study 
in preparation lor 
work with German 
penal institutions. 

The six men and 
one woman were se- 
lected by the U. S. 
High Commissioner 
for Germany and were 
enrolled at Maryland 
by the State Depart- 
ment. For two aca- 
demic semesters, the 
trainees will take 
courses offered under 
the university's crime 
control curriculum, directed by Dr. Peter 
P. Lejins, program coordinator of the 
project. 

The academic program for the penolo- 
gists will be supplemented with numerous 
field trips to American penal institutions. 

Navy Aviator 

Naval Aviation Cadet Raymond W. 
Bellamy, Jr., who attended A&S, '48 to 
'52. 20. son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. 
Bellamy, Sr., graduated recently from the 
U. S. Naval School, Pre-Flight, Pensacola, 
Florida. 

In addition to a thorough physical train- 
ing program the fifteen week Pre-Flight 
course includes aeronautical and naval sub- 
jects aimed at preparing officer candidates 
for flight training and eventual commis- 
sioning as naval officers. 

Naval Cadet Bellamy, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond W. Bellamy of Cheverly, 
graduated from Bladensburg High School 
in 1948. He entered the Naval Service in 
January 1952 prior to being selected for 
Pre-Flight training through the Naval Air 
Station, Anacostia, in May 1952. 

He is now assigned to duty with the 
U. S. Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Whiting 
Field. Milton, Florida, where he is en- 
gaged in primary flight training. Upon 
completion of his training at Pensacola and 
Corpus Christi, Texas, he will be awarded 
the gold wings of a Naval aviator and 
assigned to duty with the fleet. 

"I wish to take this opportunity to con- 
gratulate you on the occasion of your son 
Raymond's graduation from the U. S. 
Naval Pre-Flight School," wrote Captain 
W. D. Anderson, U. S. N., in a letter to 
Mr. and Mrs. Bellamy. 

"During his fifteen week Pre-Flight 
course he has demonstrated by his attitude 
and diligence that he possesses the high 
qualifications necessary to become a Naval 
Officer and pilot. His successful comple- 
tion of the course, which is on the col- 
lege level, represents no little accomplish- 
ment and you may well feel justly proud 
of him," Captain Anderson continued, "and 
I express my sincerest congratulations to 
you and to your son in the fulfillment of 
his ambition for a Naval career." 

With 31st Infantry 

Major Walter I. Berlin (who attended 
A&S '36-'38) is executive officer of 7th 
Division's 31st Infantry Regiment, Korea. 

Since landing at Inchon in 1950 the 7th 
Division has fought in every sector of the 
Korean Peninsula, including the Yalu. 

Major Berlin, has been in Korea eight 
months. 



[34; 



Receives Appointment 

John M. Howard, who attended A&S 
'26- '28, has been appointed general traffic 
manager of the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company. Washington. D. C. 
He entered the telephone business in 1928 
as a clerk and has held positions in the 
commercial and traffic departments. He 
was made district commercial manager in 
1943 and in 1945 headed up all Govern- 
ment operations for the company. He was 
appointed general commercial manager in 
December 1946. 

Mr. Howard is very active in Wash- 
ington's civic and community affairs. 

At Fort Riley 

Alfred B. McClintock, who attended 
A&S '48 to '51 was commissioned a second 
lieutenant in the Army at Fort Riley. 

Korea Decoration 

Captain Mordecai G. Welling ( A&S 
'42). has been awarded his first cluster to 
the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious 
service in Korea in recognition of service 
from Feb. 1 to June. 1952. 

Captain Welling, who was a member of 
Company K, 7th Infantry Regiment. 3d 
Infantry Division has since returned to 
the States. 

A veteran of World War II. he wears 
the Purple Heart and the second award of 
the Combat Infantry badge. 



Police Shortage 

An undermanned police force coupled 
with a 15 to 17 per cent increase in auto- 
mobiles has confronted the University 
with a serious traffic problem, said Campus 
Police Chief Dan Wiseman. 

There are 7000 vehicles registered, a 
considerable increase over last year, and 
the eight uniformed men of Wiseman's 
forces, two of whom issue parking tickets, 
find it a task much too large for them to 
handle properly. 

"One of the biggest headaches," Wise- 
man said, "is that students do not know 
where to park their cars." 

A total of 50 male students were needed 
to handle traffic for football games. 

This year, Wiseman said, is a difficult 
one traffic-wise since all of Maryland home 
games are at the same time as the 
Laurel races. 



Terrapintopics 

THE place for a knocker 
is outside the door . . . 
There were just as many 
lousy drivers in the old 
days but the horses had 
sense . . . Give a boaster 
a chance to make good 
and watch him fade out. 
. . . Some day the lion 
and the lamb will lie 
down together, . . . Five will get you ten 
it will be the lion that gets up . . . Life is 
a little raveling plucked from the fabric 
of eternity; we may play with it like chil- 
dren or work with it like artisans. . . . 
Great success ofttimes consists of doing 
the things that can't be done. 




DUNCAN BROTHERS, INC. 

CHEVROLET • OLDS • CADILLAC 
GMC TRUCKS . GREAT DANE TRAILERS 

Sales & Service 

"First In Service Because We Put Service First" 

Telephones 255-455-655 

POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



Seed Cleaning 

Clover Seed 
Fertilizer • Lime 



HORACE M. MORGAN 

Queen Anne, Maryland 



Call us to purchase your 
Lespedeza and Red Clover 

Phone- Hillsboro 3 89 1 



Reach for-- 




THE CAMBRIDGE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Manufacturers of 

i lew- i/lm d5roiler creeds 

FOR FASTER GROWING CHICKS 

CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



I 



Concrete Septic Tanks 

EVERLASTING 

G. E. GILLESPIE & SON 

SUDLERSVILLE, MD. 



35 




MARYLAND IN ECUADOR 

Left to right: — Manuel Ortega. President, Holstein-Friesian Association of Ecuador, Galo Plaza, Maryland Alumnus and former President of Ecuador, 
who has done much to improve agriculture in Ecuador; Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of the College of Agriculture; M. B. Nichols, Washington State 
College; an unidentified press representative, and Cristobal Ponci, Secretary of the Holstein-Friesian Association of Ecuador. 



College of- 



Agriculture 




State Supervisor 

ONE of the highest administrative posi- 
tions in the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education is held by H. M. Mc- 
Donald, State Super- 
visor of Agriculture 
Education. 

Mr. McDonald was 
graduated from the 
ST University of Mary- 
B land College of Agri- 

^ culture in 1920, and 

hg^B received hi? Master ol 
M Arts at Columbia in 
I graduate work at the 
i Universities of Chica- 
Sup. McDonald go and Wisconsin, and 
at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Prior to assuming his present post in 
1946. he served many years as a school 
teacher. He was instructor of agriculture 
at Newark. Delaware High School, both 
the Frederick and Sparks High Schools in 
Maryland, and was also principal of the 
Sparks school. 

A resident of Towson, Maryland, he is 
married to the former Mary Catherine 
Etchison. He has two sons. Jim is on 
active duty with the Navy and John is a 
sophomore at Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity. 

Win Dairy Judging 
The University's dairy judging team 
took first place in the intercollegiate dairy 
cattle judging contest conducted at the 
Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, 
Mass. 

They not only took team honors but 
also captured both first and second places 
in the individual competition. 

Thomas Weller, junior, was declared the 
best judge of Jerseys, second best in Ayr- 
shires and fifth best in Holsteins. He was 



also the top individual among contestants 
from 12 universities. 

William Huffard. of Sparks, senior, was 
runnerup. 

Other members of the team scoring 
points were Barbara Riggs, junior, who 
was named the best judge of Guernseys 
with a perfect score, and William Merrill 
of Elkton. alternate. 

Turkey Growers Meet 

The Maryland Turkey Producers' Asso- 
ciation held its annual meeting at the Uni- 
versity, with a movie and opening remarks 
by Association President Glenn Cowles, 
Salisbury. 

Hatchery problems were the topic of 
Stanley Marsden, Department of Agricul- 
ture turkey specialist from the Beltsville 
research center. Bill Williamson. Salis- 
bury, talked on dressing plant equipment. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd. president of the Univer- 
sity, was the speaker at the luncheon. 

The final feature was a review of turkey 
research work at the University, by Dr. 
G. F. Combs, poultry nutritionist, and Dr. 
C. S. Shaffner, poultry physiologist. There 
was also a tour of the University's poultry 
facilities. 

Edward F. Holter 

Edward F. Holter of Middletown, dis- 
tinguished member of the University's 
Board of Regents, is also a Maryland grad- 
uate, as well as an outstanding and success- 
ful agriculturist. 

The Maryland re- 
gent, who is a well- 
known livestock and 
dairy farmer, is cur- 
j rently serving his 
fourth consecutive 
two-year term as Mas- 
ter of the Maryland 
State Grange. He also 
holds the position of 
Lecturer of the Na- 
tional Grange. 

Mr. Holter was grad- 
uated from the Col- 
lege of Agriculture in 
1921. After 10 years 
teaching vocational agriculture in Mary- 




Mr. Holter 



land public schools, he purchased his par- 
ents' Jefferson, Maryland farm. He de- 
veloped this farm in 1932 by adding mod- 
ern dairy structures and purchasing the 
adjoining farm land. In the spring of 
1952, he bought a second farm in the 
Eastern section of Frederick county. 

Active in civic organizations, he has 
served as president of the Frederick 
County Holstein Association, president of 
the Middletown Lions Club, and com- 
mander of Everhart Post No. 51 of the 
American Legion. He organized and served 
as president of the Middletown Commun- 
ity Council. A member of the State Fair 
Board under Governor Lane, he was re- 
appointed to the board by Governor Mc- 
Keldin. 

In 1950. Baltimore's WBAL-TV Station, 
awarded Mr. Holter a plaque for "con- 
spicuous contribution to agriculture." 

He married Naomi Grace Kepler of 
Middletown in 1924. The Holters' daughter 
is Mrs. John Franklin Bossard. Dr. Bos- 
sard is a 1951 graduate of the Maryland 
School of Medicine. 

At Daytona Beach 

Lieutenant Commander Stanley Levy, 
I'SXR. who attended Agriculture, '37-'41. 
is Inspector-Instructor for Naval Reserve 
in Daytona Beach. 
Fla.. after returning 
from Korea where he 
was executive officer 
of the transport L T SS 
Henrico. 

He saw duty during 
World War II in both 
Pacific and Atlantic 
theatres, in the USS 
Mizar, and later as 
commanding officer of 
patrol craft. To inac- 
tive duty in January, 
1946, Lt. Comdr. Levy 
voluntarily returned in April 1949. 

While on inactive duty, Lt. Comdr. 
Levy served as commanding officer of 
Organized Reserves in Baltimore. 




Lt. Cdr. Levy 



36 



From South America 

Three distinguished guests from South 
American countries visited the University 
campus to observe several of the univer- 
sity's agricultural facilities. 

They were Germain Fernandez-Concha, 
Peru's Ambassador to Canada; Father 
Arango, Rector of Catholic University in 
Bogota, Colombia ; and Father Vargas, 
Rector of Lima, Peru's Catholic Univer- 
sity. Senor Fernandez-Concha received his 
agricultural degree from Maryland in 1949. 

The three visitors toured both College 
Park and Beltsville. 

Front Liner 

First Lt. Charles E. Anthony, Jr.. (Agr. 
'51), has been awarded the Combat In- 
fantryman Badge while serving with the 
25th Infantry Division in Korea, symbol 
of the frontline fighting man. Anthony 
arrived in Korea last March. 
Proper Drainage 

Proper land drainage is an essential 
factor in successful farming. By the organ- 
ization of Public Drainage Associations 
many farmers are receiving needed assist- 
ance. 

In Queen Anne's County, Maryland, 
an active drainage program is being car- 
ried out. Landowners of properties with 
improper drainage are fortunate in being 
able to have their land made more produc- 
tive through a tax ditch program. 

Great accomplishments have been made. 
Public Drainage Associations have been 
organized through the cooperative efforts 
of the Queen Anne's County Board of 
County Commissioners, the Soil Conser- 
vation District supervisors, and the Ex- 
tension Service. 

Associations are formed in any area in 
which neighboring farmers find the need 
for such. The landowners are taxed by 
the County Commissioners proportionately 
in respect to the number of acres of till- 
able land and woodland directly benefited 
and only for the actual expense of ad- 
vertising to comply with the Drainage 
Laws of Maryland, and for clearing and 
dynamiting of the ditch. Annually the 
County Commissioners of Queen Anne's 
County budget is in excess of $20,000 for 
this most worthy program. 

30 Public Drainage Associations have 
been completely organized under the di- 
rect supervision of C. P. Merrick, Jr.. 
Drainage Engineer of the University of 
Maryland. Much assistance is given by 
the County Agent in the preliminary work 
of organization. 

Taxables on these organized ditches 
number 463. Man}', many acres are im- 
proved for agricultural production through 
this program. In fact, of the 30 ditches 
thus organized, a total of 63.567 acres have 
been benefited by providing adequate pri- 
mary drainage outlets. 

At the present time there are 11 As- 
sociations in the process of organization 
in Queen Anne's County which will benefit 
an additional 10,431 acres of land. 

Once a year meetings of all taxables on 
all ditches are held for the purpose of 
electing two managers and a treasurer to 
conduct whatever business is deemed 
necessary during the course of the year 
in keeping the Associations active. 

According to J. Walter Eby, County 
Agent of Queen Anne's County, requests 



for assistance in organizing Public Drain- 
age Associations are constantly being pre- 
sented for approval. As soon as these are 
approved by the Board of County Com- 
missioners, the process of organization 
begins. 

This program has made many citizens 
both rural and urban aware of their de- 
pendence upon the land and has acquainted 
them with the effects of improper drainage 
upon their health and welfare. 

Springmann Choir Head 

When the newly formed University of 
Maryland Chapel Choir presented its in- 
itial program, it had as its director, Fague 
K. Springmann, former baritone soloist 
with the Washington National Symphony 
and the Philadelphia Opera Company. 

Mr. Springmann. an associate professor 
of music, received his bachelor of music 
degree from Westminster Choir College, 
Princeton, X. J., in 1939. Since then he 
has held numerous distinguished positions 
in the music world. 

Shortly after the 1941 Pearl Harbor at- 
tack, Mr. Springmann took part in a com- 
mand performance for President Roosevelt 
and Prime Minister Churchill. He made 
his formal debut in New York City's Car- 
negie Hall in 1949 and performed as guest 
star on the Telephone Hour under Donald 
Vorhees in the same year. For the last 
three years, Mr. Springmann has served 
as director of music for the Fourth Pres- 
byterian Church, Washington, D. C. 

The choir has been engaged to sing next 
Memorial Day with the United States 
Marine Band at Arlington National 
Cemetery on a program broadcast coast 
to coast and the President of the United 
States as speaker. 





MILK IS BETTER 
In GLASS Bottles 

From the standpoint of good 
judgment you should SEE the 
milk you buy — its Quality and 
Quantity. From the standpoint 
of economics you should in- 
sist on receiving it in GLASS 
bottles. 

The life of a GLASS milk bot- 
tle, through its return and RE- 
USE, represents many trips; 
substitute containers make only 
one trip. The cost of the 
GLASS bottle, per trip, is a 
small fraction of other types — 
someone must absorb the dif- 
ference. 

INSIST ON YOUR MILK 
in GLASS Bottles 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort Ave. & Lawrence St. 

Baltimore 30, Md. 



AT OCEAN CITY 

H. Ec : "See that terp on the beach. Can you 
tell me why he is like Christmas time?" 

Phys. Ed.: "No, Mistuh Bones. YOU tell me 
why IS a terp on the beach like Christmas 
time?" 

H. Ec. : Because. Mistuh Tambo, he has 
sandy claws." 



F 



SAVINGS & LOAN ASSN. 

"WHERE SAVINGS ARE SAFE" 

Insured up to $10,000.00 

5304 YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

Organized 1884 



37 



BALTIMORE 




DON'T GUESS 
GET -* 




MEATS 



BALTIMORE 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LE. 2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1 822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



* * 




• • 
Phone LExington 7055 



GOEB PRINTING CO. 

347 N. HOLLIDAY ST. 
PLaza 5675 Baltimore 2 



Glenn L. Martin- 
College of 



Engineering and 

Aeronautical 

Sciences 

^^^^ Col. O. II. Saunders, ' io 




James E. Dingmon 

A MARYLAND alumnus who has dis- 
tinguished himself as an important 
leader in the nation's communications field 
is James E. Dingman, vice-president in 
charge of operations 
of the Bell Telephone 
companies of Pennsyl- 
vania and Delaware. 

Mr. Dingman grad- 
uated with a Bachelor 
of Sciences degree in 
Mechanical Engineer- 
ing in 1921. 
^^ WM He began his long 

IP^^B I corporation service 
H A I w ith the Western Elec- 

H xk ^1 I trie Company in New 
V. Pres. Dingman York in 1922 as a 
tester in the instal- 
lation training department. The follow- 
ing year, he went to work for the Ameri- 
can Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany in New York, holding numerous en- 
gineering and staff assignments until 1949. 
After joining the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany of Pennsylvania and the Diamond 
State Telephone Company of Delaware as 
vice-president in charge of personnel, he 
was appointed to his present post as vice- 
president in charge of operations for the 
two companies, and also assumed mem- 
bership on the respective Board of Direc- 
tors of these companies. 

Lt. Colonel Weber Returns 

Back on the job as business manager 
of the University after two years' duty 
as a Lieutenant Colonel in the U. S. Army 
is George 0. Weber (Eng. '33) who was 
activated shortly after the Korean out- 
break while he was commanding officer of 
the 163rd military police battalion of the 
D. C. National Guard. 
After spending the 
first year of this duty 
as commander of the 
same District battalion 
at Fort Custer, Mich.. 
Col. Weber was or- 
dered to Korea where 
he served ten months. 
He was senior advisor 
for the Korean Mili- 
tary Advisory Group, 
with his efforts con- 
Lt. Col. Weber centrated with the 
Korean Replacement 
Training Center. 

Col. Weber's duties included selection 
of sites for camps for the South Korean 
Army and subsequent organization of 
their construction. He was also senior 
advisor to a South Korean combat regi- 
ment, working closely with the regiment's 




31 year-old Brigadier General and a 30 
year-old Colonel staff officer. 

The Maryland official met many of the 
University's former athletes in the war- 
torn country who also were activated for 
two years as members of the 163rd bat- 
talion. 

Col. Weber will be remembered by foot- 
ball fans for the rousing cheers he and 300 
men from his Fort Custer battalion sup- 
plied at the 1950 Maryland-Michigan State 
gridiron classic at East Lansing. It was 
this Maryland victory which did much to 
catapult the Terrapins into the national 
football spotlight. 

Colonel Weber received distinguished 
honors in World War II. He entered the 
Army in February, 1940, with the famed 
29th Division. Later followed assignments 
in Military Intelligence with the War De- 
partment. Command and General Staff 
School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and 
the 92nd Infantry Division. 

As an infantry battalion commander he 
served in Italy where he was twice 
wounded and, for gallantry in action, re- 
ceived the Silver Star and Bronze Star 
with oak leaf cluster. He also wears the 
Italian Military Order of Merit, the De- 
fense Medal for Pre-Pearl Harbor service, 
the general service ribbon, the Atlantic 
ribbon, and the European ribbon with 
three battle stars. 

While a student at Maryland, he was 
president of his senior class, a varsity bas- 
ketball stalwart, and ROTC cadet com- 
mander. He is a member of the Sigma Chi 
fraternity. He will remain with the D. C. 
Guard as Staff Inspector General. 

To N. O. L. 

William P. Ludtke, Jr., (Eng '52), has 
been appointed an aeronautical engineer 
at Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White Oak, 
Md. He will work in the Weapons Mecha- 
nisms Division of the Underwater Ord- 
nance Department. 

In Stuttgart 

Colonel William E. Roberts (Eng. '3D. 
is serving with Seventh Army Head- 
quarters in Stuttgart, Germany, as chief 
of Operations Branch, Plans and Opera- 
tions Special Staff section. 

Colonel Roberts served in the South 
Pacific with the 6th Infantry Division 
during World War II. He holds the 
Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with 
Oak Leaf Cluster and Army Commenda- 
tion Ribbon. 

The colonel received his commission in 
1931 following his graduation from Mary- 
land. 

George Wick Returns 

George Allen Wick, (Engr. '23) was 
again elected to the Engineering Alumni 
Board, this time for a three year term. 
Mr. Wick previously served on the Board 
for a period of two years from 1949 to 
1951. He was born in Washington in 1900. 
and graduated from McKinley Manual 
Training School in 1919, and thereafter 
from Maryland in 1923, where he was a 
member of Phi Sigma Kappa and also of 
Scabbard & Blade. 

After graduation he worked for a short 
period for the C. & P. Telephone Com- 
pany and then for a period of 22 years 
with the Rosslyn Steel & Cement Com- 
pany, resigning from that company to go 
into general contracting. He is now Secre- 



38 



tary of the firm of Davis. Wick, Rosen- 
garten, Co. Mr. Wick is a member of the 
Masonic Order; the American Society of 
Civil Engineers; and the Engineering Club 
of Washington. He married the former 
Gertrude C. Wood, and the couple reside 
at 7305 Overfull Road. Bethesda, Mary- 
land. Adding Mr. Wick to the Board 
brings to that unit a man of enthusiasm 
for Alumni matters as well as a man of 
proven experience with the organization. 
The Alumni are to be congratulated upon 
having secured his presence on the Board 
for the next three years. 

Report of Out-Going Chairman 

The outgoing Chairman of the Engineer- 
ing Alumni Board, being absent from the 
Annual Meeting on Homecoming Day, 
due to being in Montana, submitted a 
report to be read at that meeting to cover 
the activities of the Board since the last 
Annual Meeting. 

The Board met five times during the 
year and transacted business at the re- 
spective meetings generally covering the 
following: 1st — organization; 2nd — com- 
mittee assignments — plans for Spring Rally 
— and push to Job Opportunity Service; 
3rd — and 4th — plans for additional pub- 
licity — Awards Committee plan started — 
Spring Rally proposals approved; and 5th 
—plans for Homecoming. All meetings 
were well attended, attesting to the in- 
terest your representatives take in Alumni 
activities. In addition four members of 
the Board, — namely, — Ward '32; Koons 
'29; Saunders '10; with Warthen '08 as 
alternate, attended four meetings of the 
over-all Alumni Council in Baltimore. 

The out-going Chairman outlined the 
work of the various Committees, namely, 
— Job Opportunity Service, Awards, Pub- 
licity, Joint Rally, and Homecoming, and 
thanked the members of the Committees, 
the members of the Board, the past Presi- 
dents of the Engineering Alumni Board, 




AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY 

(1800, that is) 

"I contend, Brother Paca, that the area sur- 
rounding Ross' yonder presents an ideal site 
for a State university." 

"I agree, Brother Carroll, but do you believe 
the politicians of Baltimore City would ever 
permit its establishment this far out into the 
country? How in the world would the students 
ever manage to make the journey to this remote 
area?" 



J 



Qtrapin 



Or, 



Wei 



full, 



f ° r °»t. of ., ***** 



C %, 



G 



and 



olu 



Se r 



'y 



*th 



Wc 6 



c °mf< 



4r/c/ 



° rf ob/ ( 



' S '»Orl d 



We/ 



">ni 



^e Q/s 



' n *an 



r *c 



/•Oq 



ft 



o/t 



0o Of y 



e W/, 



nis 



QfeA 



'rtio 



re 



V. th 



and 



'9hK 



"no, 



re Q _ 



e *V e 



$u Perb 



r eth 



' s °nf< 



e H 



Or 



e Oc/ ( 



^ok, 



°"nd 



>n 



h 



Wo 



nd. 



9W 



9 th 



Qn ofh 



©r 



<?* 



fs 



Ord 



*'%, 



'>-<% 



If* 



e 'e 



nt 



'mmondb 



lo 



un 



8* 




SINCE 




1890 



Fidelity and Deposit 
company of maryland 

Home Office: Baltimore* $Md. 



FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 

Burglary, Robbery, Forgery & Glass Insurance 



[39; 



FAIRHAVEN 


FARMS 


DAIRY 


Serving the 


UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 


OF BALTIMORE 


SYKESVILLE, MD. 



HENDLERS 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Almost 50 Years 



HOME OF THE FAMOUS 

Asia Chow Mein 

Fast Becoming Baltimore's Most 
Popular Restaurant 

Cantonese and American dishes 



VISIT THE 
ROSE ROOM 

For a Delightful Cocktail 



m 



Opens 1 2 A. M. 
to 3 A. m. 

RESTAURANT 

710 N. HOWARD ST. 



HOME DELIVERY CALL VE. 8193 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md. 



and others to include the Dean of the 
Engineering College and the Executive 
Secretary of the Alumni Association for 
their generous assistance during the year. 

Of particular point was the thanks ex- 
pressed to every member of the Engineer- 
ing Alumni for whatever support he had 
given during the year, with the hope that 
such support would continue and grow 
with the years. 

Suggestions made by the outgoing Chair- 
man for future action by the Engineering 
Almuni Board included efforts to increase 
subscriptions to the magazine "Maryland," 
keeping the Job Opportunity Service 
functioning, preparing awards to perpet- 
uate the memories of past instructors of 
engineering, supporting the Centennial 
Celebration for 1956. seeking contributions 
to the Scholarship Fund backed by the 
Central Council of the Alumni, and to 
give serious consideration to a change of 
the Spring Rally to some other form of 
gathering for engineers that may pull a 
greater attendance than has been the re- 
sult of recent years. 

Busy Summer 

During the past summer, Dean S. S. 
Steinberg spent a week in New Orleans at 
the sessions of the Pan American Federa- 
tion of Engineering 
Societies as a repre- 
sentative of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland 
and also as official 
delegate of the Amer- 
ican Society for En- 
gineering Education. 
Following the New 
Orleans Conference, 
he went to Monterey, 
Mexico, to inspect the 
Monterey Technolog- 
ical Institute, a new- 
engineering college 
suported by Mexican industrialists. The 
Institute is housed in modernistic build- 
ings, has courses in engineering similar to 
our own, and a full-time faculty of about 
50 members, an unusual feature in en- 
gineering schools of Latin America. 

In Chicago, Dean Steinberg took part 
in the 100th Anniversary Celebration of 
the American Society for Civil Engineers 
and also attended meetings of the Engin- 
eers' Council for Professional Develop- 
ment, the national engineering accrediting 
agency. 

Job Opportunity Service 

The Job Opportunity Service, initiated 
by the Engineering Alumni Board, to be 
of assistance to experienced engineer grad- 
uates in presenting to them opportunities 
for betterment that might come to the 
attention of the College of Engineering, 
has operated the plan presented by former 
President of the Engineering Alumni 
Board, Fred Cutting, in conjunction with 
Dean Steinberg's office. Something in the 
neighborhood of a hundred opportunities 
have been processed thru the routine set 
up and the applicants notified. Upon re- 
ceipt of a request from a former graduate 
the information available is matched up 
with his wishes and accomplishments and 
he is sent a letter from Dean Steinberg's 
Office advising him of the prospective 
employer and position and further contact 




Dean Steinberg 



then left to the applicant, with a request 
that the Dean's Office be notified of the 
result. To date, few, if any, reports of 
results have been received ; but if any 
alumnus has benefited by this service it 
would be appreciated if they would so 
notify the Dean's Office. The Engineering 
Alumni Board considers that it is doing 
a useful service in this matter and is 
greatly assisted by the Dean's Office, 
through the hearty cooperation of Dean 
Steinberg, who is keenly interested in the 
project. During the past year the Com- 
mittee working on this has been comprised 
of Cutting '34; S. Chester Ward, '32; and 
C. A. Warthen '08. 

Abribot and Robertson 

Marc G. Abribat '47, is Sales Engineer 
for Ingersoll-Rand Company following 
seventeen months in the Marine Corps. 
Classmate H. G. Robertson is in the En- 
gineering Department of the DuPont 
Company. 

1927 Engineer 
Data received from E. Minor Wenner, 
(Engr. '27) as to his prospective attendance 
at Homecoming on 25 October, last, points 
up the situation of a reporter of Alumni 
matters, in that such a reporter often finds 
himself in the posi- 
tion of the guest, 
Damocles, at the 
sumptuous banquet 
given by Dionysius, 
when Damocles found 
himself seated under 
a naked sword sus- 
pended by a single 
hair. In the reporter's 
case, figuratively, the 
"naked sword" is the 
dead line and the 
"single hair" is the 
"explosive pressure" of 
the editor calling for news. The informa- 
tion below as to Wenner missed the last 




Mr. Wenner 




"THE WINNAH!" 

"Gosh! Herkimer, that's a good looking car 
you have there. It must have cost you a pretty 
penny." 

"That's where you're wrong, Alfalfa. It did 
not cost me a thin dime. All I had to do was 
send in a certain number of box tops from 
Krimply Krumplies, accompanied by the win- 
ning jingle about Krimply Krumplies. I won 
the contest just as advertised on TV and they 
sent me the car. Good car to live in too!" 

"Live in? Why don't you live in the house?" 

"Can't. The house is full of Krimply 
Krumplies." 



40 



issue of "Maryland" because the dead line 
had to be met and his facts came too late, 
but here they are, anyway. 

Wenner lives at 202 Caryl Drive, Pitts- 
burgh 27, Pennsylvania, and is employed as 
an Industrial Sales Engineer by the Du- 
quesne Light Company, a public utility 
serving the Pittsburgh area, with whom he 
lias been since 1928. Immediately follow- 
ing his graduation in 1927 he spent one 
year with the Westinghouse Electric and 
Manufacturing Company on their graduate 
student training course before joining the 
company by whom he is now employed. 
In October of 1931 he married Sarah 
Elizabeth Helbling of Pittsburgh and they 
are the parents of two daughters; Nancy 
Joan Wenner. age 18. who is beginning 
her freshman year in Home Economics at 
Pennsylvania State College; and Sally 
Ann Wenner. age 15, who is a sophomore 
in Clairton High School. 

Wenner is a Registered Professional 
Engineer in the State of Pennsylvania; a 
member of the Association of Iron & Steel 
Engineers; and the Electric League of 
Western Pennsylvania. He was looking 
forward with keen anticipation to joining 
with members of his old class at Home- 
coming time. 

New Board Members 

Harold E. Earp, Jr., (B.S. of C.E. '42) 
of Brookeville, Md., is one of the newly 
elected members of the Engineering 
Alumni Board, to serve for the ensuing 
three years. Upon his graduation in 1942 
he was commissioned in the Corps of 
Engineers and shortly thereafter trans- 
ferred to the Air Force, serving in Texas 
as a test pilot and Commanding Officer of 
a Depot Repair Squadron, with time out 
to attend the command and General Staff 
School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He 
was relieved from active duty as a Captain 
in January, 1946. Thereafter he was with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad in Cleveland, 
Ohio, as Assistant in the Engineering 
Corps of that organization; following 
which he became the Deputy Manager of 
the Baltimore Municipal Airport until 
May, 1948, when he entered upon his 
present engagement as Superintendent for 
W. F. Wilson and Sons, Inc., a contracting 
firm specializing in the construction of 
storm drains, sanitary sewers, water lines 
and conduit lines in and around Baltimore, 
Washington and Frederick. In 1943, Earp 
married Edwina Hambleton, who was a 
member of the Home Economics class of 
1942 at Maryland, and they are the proud 
parents of one daughter, Jane Marie, age 
18 months. While at the University. Earp 
was a Theta Chi, A.S.C.E. member and 
an advanced R.O.T.C. student. With his 
experience, contacts, and enthusiasm for 
Alumni matters, he will be an outstanding 
member of the Engineering Alumni Board, 
we predict. 

Mr. Dye, class of '34, Civil Engineering, 
a Washingtonian, began his engineering 
career as a surveyman with the National 
Park Service of the Department of the 
Interior and worked there until 1937. 
Following this period he worked for the 
Carnegie-Illinois Steel Company in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. and then in 1940 returned to 
Washington, resuming his career with the 




serve! 

Our Cooker-Cooked corn is cooked and 
sealed just 15 minutes after it is pulled ! 
Natural flavor, tenderness and color is sealed 
in . . . just like eating fresh corn on the cob! 



Packers of Whole Kernel Shoepeg and Golden Sweet Corn 

F. O. MITCHELL & BRO., INC 

Ferryman, Maryland - Kennedyville, Maryland 



MAIN OFFICE. PERRYMAN, MD. 



PHONE ABERDEEN 621-J 




1899 Fijty-tbree Years of Fine Printing 1952 

PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS ENGRAVERS 

Phone: SAratoga 6560 
40-42 SOUTH PACA ST. BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



THE HOME OF 7 HOUR SERVICE 

DRIVE-IN 




JfU)_ PULASKI HIGHWAY AT ERDMAN AVENUE 

BRoadway 6600 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING, FUR STORAGE, RUG CLEANING 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 

Phone MUlberry 6070 Baltimore 2, Maryland 



41 



Edward 

Boker 

Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc. 



SERVING 

HOSPITALS 

AND 

INSTITUTIONS 

James T, Doukas, Mgr. 

LAwrence 6-8350 

1480 OKIE ST., N.E. 

WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



Sheet Metal • Skylights 

^rrvln f-^richett 

GENERAL ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

Phone ATlantic 1 344 



1504 48th PLACE, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half Street, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



W. R. HILL COMPANY 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Government Contracts 

Phone: NOrth 7-1313 

1313 - 13th STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 5, D.C. 



Government. He is now employed on the 
staff of the Commissioner of Public Build- 
ings Service, General Services Administra- 
tion. For the past several years his work 
with the Public Buildings Service has been 
in the field of building and industrial plant 
management. He has been active in the 
Buildings Management Association for a 
number of years and served as president 
of that organization in 1951. 

He is married to Mora (Pudge) Plager, 
'34 Arts and Science and has two children, 
Jimmy, 5, and Ellen, 2. 

We are confident that the Engineering 
Board has acquired an outstanding worker 
in Mr. Dye. 

A Letter from Flin Flon 

"This Town," writes M. N. Collison 
(Eng. '38) to Dave Brigham, General 
Alumni Secretary, in a letter dated at 
Flin Flon, Manitoba, "is named for the 
leading character, Josiah Flintabbatey 
Flonatin. in an old English novel 'The 
Sunless City.' The story is about a man 
who built a machine and descended into 
the earth, there to find a city, streets paved 
with gold, while iron was used for coin- 
age and the city ruled by women. He 
escaped thru a hole in the ground. A 
paper bound copy of this novel was found 
near the mine in a hollow (the escape 
hole) and hence the name 'old Flin Flon's 
mine' and now Flin Flon." 

Mr. Collison's letter continues, 

"Actual development began in 1927, 
production in 1930. In 1928 the C N Rail- 
road was extended from the The Pas but 
not until 1951 was there a highway. 

"Initial mining operations were by open 
pit methods. Today all operations are 
underground with the majority of the ore 
hoisted from 4000 feet below the surface 
at a speed of 30 miles per hour. 

"The minerals in the ore are mainly 
copper and zinc with appreciable quantities 
of gold, silver, cadmium, selenium, teller- 
ium and lead. 

"The town boasts a population of ap- 
proximately 13,000, 2500 employed by the 
H. B. M and S. Company. Most of the 
town is served by water and sewer systems. 
Nearly all of the streets are gravel but 
several miles of black topping have been 
completed and more is scheduled. There 
are more than 80 privately owned stores 
and businesses including commercial fish- 
ing, trapping and lumbering, two motion 
picture theatres and one radio (Station 
CFAR). 

"The surrounding country is dotted with 
lakes of all sizes for boating, fishing and 
swimming. The largest fish ever caught 
on rod and reel weighed 63 pounds — a 
lake trout. Numerous catches in the 20 
to 40 pound class are made. The Phantom 
Lake resort, located about IMj miles from 
town is complete with diving towers, sand 
beach, tennis courts, and a 9 hole golf 
course. 

"Winter activities consist of bowling, 
skating and hockey. The big sport is 
curling. Flin Flon has one of the largest 
memberships in its Curling Club of any 
club in Canada. What is curling? Take 
eight men 4 to a side, each with one 
broom and two stones weighing 40 pounds 
apiece, a sheet of ice about 150 feet long 



and 10 feet wide, a temperature anywhere 
below freezing preferably below and 
slide these stones down the ice with a 
delivery similiar to that in bowling. A 
scoring system similar to shuffle board 
completes the ingredients of curling. At 
Flin Flon it is THE winter sport. The 
Bonspiel in February is a curling marathon 
— lasting about six days and going nearly 
24 hours a day. 

"The winter brings about an amazing 
change in transportation. Places, inacces- 
sible in the summer except by airplane 
or canoe and foot, are reached by tractor 
and even auto, by clearing a trail, letting 
the ground freeze, and packing the layer 
of snow. These "roads" are used to link 
the many lakes which in reality are the 
backbone of transportation in the bush 
country of the North. Lake ice makes one 
of the finest highway surfaces. These lakes 
make this country the world's safest flying 
area. At an altitude of 2,500 feet there are 
very few spots where a plane equipped with 
pontoons in the summer and skis in the 
winter cannot land. A plane with wheels 
is used only for going south. During the 
spring break up and the fall freeze all lake 
flying ceases. There is a man made land- 
ing strip used by the daily plane to Win- 
nipeg (575 miles to the Southeast). 

"Hunting for moose and bear is good. 
To the South for deer, ducks and geese. 

"The whole family has enjoyed Flin 
Flon, met a lot of fine people who have 
been wonderful neighbors, and participated 
in many sports. 

"We thought we were pioneering to 
come here when we did but, in listening 
to the tales of other days, the early 
pioneers of the U.S. and Canada were 
much worse off. At one time there were 
only four women and several hundred men 
here. 

"Flin Flon on a map? About 54° 45 
minutes North Latitude and on the Mani- 
toba-Saskatchewan border. It should be 
there if the map is recent." 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Competing with all members of national 
Fanhellenic, the Maryland chapter of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority received 
an award at the national Kappa conven- 
tion for having the second highest scholar- 
ship for the past three years in the Pan- 
hellenic group. 

This was the first time in the history 
of the University that such an award has 
been won, though the local Kappa chapter 
has won first honors in campus scholar- 
ship for four of the last six years. 

Besides winning second place in scholar- 
ship, Kappa also won honorable mention 
for their publication, "Kappa's Capers." 

Attending the convention were Jane Ca- 
hill, president; Jeanine Eberts, treasurer; 
and Sally Gardner, social chairman. 



HEARD ON THE RIDGES 

"Wut fer, Abner, be yo' a-sendin' yo' boy 
to college? A-livin' up yar in the hills he 
won't have no need nohow fer any of that thar 
book larnin'." 

"Ah'm a-gonna send him sure 'nuf, Lafe, on 
account these days them thar colleges kin teach 
anythin' and Ah'm gonna see to it that mah 
boy learns a lot about that thar triggernometry 
because he's the wust shot in these parts." 



[42; 



College of 



Military Science 



MAJ. PATRICK J. BREEN, who at- 
tended Military Science in '49 and 
'50, has been awarded the Bronze Star 
Medal for meritorious service in Korea 
in 1951. 

His citation reads in part : 

"Major Breen demonstrated rare initia- 
tive and administrative ability in devising 
and implementing plans to provide maxi- 
mum ordnance support by the three bat- 
talions within the field group. 

"Displaying outstanding professional 
skill. Major Breen supervised a mainte- 
nance training program for the technical 
indoctrination of nearly 1,000 Republic of 
Korea Army troops. 

"Through Major Brcen's tireless efforts 
and innovations more than three billion 
ton miles of critically needed transporta- 
tion were saved. 

"Major Breen's exemplary devotion to 
duty and praiseworthy achievements con- 
tributed significantly to the United Na- 
tion's campaign for peace in Korea, reflect- 
ing credit on himself and the military 
service." 

Major Breen was commissioned in Sep- 
tember 1942. During World War II he 
served as commanding officer of an ord- 
nance company in the China-Burma-India 
Theater. He is now supply officer at the 
Sugita. Japan Ordnance Sub-Depot. 

Won His Wings 

Second Lieutenant George C. Bowen, 
Jr., USAF, Mil Sci. '51. commissioned upon 
graduation, recently won his wings at 
Vance AFB, Enid, Okla., and has been as- 
signed to Randolph Field, Texas, for duty. 

At Westover 

Lt. William G. Bastedo '52 is Squadron 
Adjutant at Westover Air Force Base, 
Mass. He received his commission in June 
and expresses satisfaction with his "chosen 
profession.'' 




THAT'S WHAT THE MAN SAID 

"I really don't know how in the world the 
Maryland campus would ever get along without 
you. However, Mr. Quattlebaum, we're going 
to give it a real big college try!" 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

SANDE WILLIAMS and his or- 
chestra offer music that is an in- 
vitation to dance. Dinner from 
6; dancing from 9:30 p.m. 

Blue Room 

BARNEE conducts the famed 
Barnee-Lowee Orchestra for your 
dancing pleasure. Dining from 
7 p.m. Floor show 10 p.m. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CAIVERT 
Reservations: ADams 0700 




Serving the 

FINEST MEATS & POULTRY 

To Hotels - Clubs - Colleges 

SOUTHERN 

HOTEL SUPPLY COMPANY 

FRANKLIN 8275 



4th tt Morse Street, N.E. 



Washington, D.C. 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 

Members 

WASHINGTON STOCK EXCHANGE 

PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



Southern Building 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3131 



115 N. St. Asaph 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



V. 



J 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

J^EComz ^luaLitu C^onicioui. 

PLANT: 621-27 G ST., N.W. MEtropolitan 2220 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 0880 



43 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks & Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs & 

Davenports 

Filing Cabinets 

Plaza 4220 

THE 

JAMES T. VERNAY 

& SONS COMPANY 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



PLaza 4821 

BLUMENTHAL-KAHN 
ELECTRIC CO., INC. 

Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures 

43 S. LIBERTY STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



H0PW00D 
Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

BALTIMORE • WASHINGTON 
ALEXANDRIA 

Towson & Beoson Streets 

PL. 0433 BALTIMORE 



UNITED CLAY & 
SUPPLY CORPORATION 

Building Materials - Brick & Tile 

Johns-Manville Products 

Carrier Refrigeration and 

Air Conditioning 

Tracy Cabinets - P/C Glass Blocks 

ESTATE RANGES 

1122 North Charles Street 

Baltimore I, Md. MUlberry 7200 



King Bros. Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotogo 5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 3, MD. 




MARYLAND ON TELEVISION 

WBAL-TV's educational program "TV-Campus" went "rural" for nine weeks and University of 
Maryland College of Agriculture cooperated. Photo shows "TV Campus" program on which Dr. A. L. 
Brueckner, Director of the Livestock Sanitation, and Dr. C. L. Everson and Mrs. Albert Lineweaver, 
Bacteriologist, of the same department appeared. This program was one of a series of nine agricultural 
"TV Campus" telecasts presented by WBAL with the assistance of the University in the interest of 
farm people. Also on the program were Mr. Richard M. Wills, farm manager of McDonogh School, 
and Mr. John HofF, a Maryland farmer. 

These special agricultural "TV Campus" programs, telecast since August on Sundays at 6:00 p.m., 
featuring professors of the University and Conway Robinson, WBAL-TV's farm program director, 
deal with matters of prime interest to farm people. 

The problem discussed was the detection and control of brucellosis in cattle. A film was shown in 
connection. Aimed directly at the farm listener, the show stressed the extreme necessity of cleanli- 
ness in the raising of livestock. 

To bring the message home, children were shown drinking milk — children whose well-being depends 
greatly upon healthy cows. 



School of- 



Medicine 



At Oakland, Cal. 
'OMMANDER ROLAND A. CHRIS- 
, TENSEN (MC) USN, (M. D. '37), 
has reported for duty 
on the Dependents 
Service, U. S. Naval 
Hospital, Oakland, 
Calif. 

Prior thereto, Com- 
mander Christensen 
was Chief of the De- 
, pendents Service at 
I USNH, Newport, R. I. 
He entered the 
Navy in 1942 after 
beaching obstetrics at 
the University of 
Christensen Pennsylvania for two 
years. 

Dougtricions Meet 

The fourth annual meeting of the Doug- 
trieians was recently held at the University 
Hospital and Southern Hotel. This organ- 
ization is composed of residents in ob- 
stetrics who have served under Dr. Louis 
H. Douglass both at the University Hospi- 
tal and the Baltimore City Hospitals. 
There were twenty-five members present 
at the meeting over which the President, 
Dr. J. Morris Reese, presided. Papers 
were presented by Dr. J. Tyler Baker, 
Easton; Dr. Chas. L. Goodhand, Parkers- 
burg, W. Va. ; Dr. Arthur Baptisti, Hagers- 
town; Dr. Schulyer G. Kohl, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Dr. George H. Davis, Baltimore; 
and Dr. Louis H. Douglass, Baltimore. 





On WBAL-TV 

Perhaps the most exciting program of 
the School of Medicine "Live and Help 
Live" series, presented Tuesday nights 
over WBAL-TV, was a telecast entitled 
"Death and the Law." Anne Holland, 
WBAL-TV's assistant director of public 
affairs, introduced Dr. 
Russell S. Fisher, 
Maryland State Medi- 
cal Examiner, his as- 
sistant, Dr. William 
V. Lovett, and Dr. 
Henry C. Freimuth, 
toxicologist in the of- 
fice of the Medical 
Examiner. This was 
timely since these men 
were making front 
page drama in con- 
Mrs. Holland nection with Balti- 
more's G rammer 
Murder Case — the homicide which almost 
became a perfect murder. 

"Death and the Law" was an endeavor 
on the part of Dr. Fisher and his staff to 
familiarize the public with the purpose 
and duties of the State Medical Examiner, 
and to show the importance of the services 
of the Medical Examiner and his staff. 

Dr. Fisher used the Grammer Murder 
Case to illustrate the ways in which the 
Examiner and his staff assist the police in 
cases of sudden, violent, and unexplained 
deaths. 

Demonstrating the exact steps he fol- 
lowed in reaching the conclusion that the 
Grammer Case involved a murder, not 
merely an accident, Dr. Fisher pointed up 
the extreme importance of complete in- 
vestigations of all deaths, including those 
resulting from accidents, occurring in an 



44 



unusual or suspicious manner, or resulting 

from homicide and suicide. 

The story of tins University of Mary- 
land program was picked up by UP wire 
service. 

Radio Demonstration 

A large-scale demonstration of the use 
of two-way radio in meeting fire problems 
was held at the University, probably the 
first time such an event has taken place, 
according to Chief Robert C. Byrus of 
the Fire Service Extension. 

The demonstration, using Prince 
George's County trucks and control board, 
was part of a two-way radio school offered 
by Fire Service Extension. Firemen from 
Maryland and Washington attended. 

The first session covered operation and 
use of communicating facilities. Herbert 
A. Friede. electrical engineer from the 
District of Columbia, was the principal 
speaker. 

The second session featured a lecture on 
fuels, regulations and frequency alloca- 
tions, by Mr. Joseph A. Giammatteo of 
the Federal Communications Commission 
and discussion of county radio problems 
by Lieut. Mackall of the Prince George's 
County Police Department. 

Publications Conference 

Editors and business managers from 
University publications attended the an- 
nual National Collegiate Press conference 
held this year in New York city. 

Representatives were from major uni- 
versities and colleges in the country are 
invited to attend. The group had reser- 
vations at the Statler hotel. 

Prominent journalists spoke on lay outs, 
make-up, photography and other journal- 
ism subjects. Last year's conference met 
at Pittsburgh; the previous year in 
Chicago. 

ETERNAL TRIANGLE 



Scott's Perennial Gardens 



PERENNIALS & ANNUALS 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

Field Grown 



PHONE 
ROSLYN 

99 1-W 



PANSY PLANTS 

Giant Strain 

Plain & Mixed Colors 



LIBERTY RD. at H A R R I S O N V I L L E — R A N D A L L S T O W N, MD. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE • BALTO. 13, MD. • BRoadway 1600 

(near intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



Williams 

Consbuction 

Company 

Grading 

Concrete & 

Macadam Paving 

Phone: Essex 1310 
BALTIMORE 20, MD. 



THE 
TOWN HOUSE 

ONE OF THE 

UNIQUE EATING 

PLACES IN THE 

COUNTRY- 
FAMOUS FOR 
FOOD IN THE 
MARYLAND 
TRADITION 

Howard & 22nd Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
HOpkins5191 




HOW IT BECAME ETERNAL 



Save For Your 

INDEPENDENCE 
BUY U. S. DEFENSE BONDS 

MAKE YOUR GOAL 
SAFE SAVINGS 

C. B. Co. 



:45] 




BISSERT'S 

Bar and 
Restaurant- 



Serving the 
finest in food and drinks 

PLAZA 9806 

Charles Street and Fort Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 



PESTS? 



"Call lite 



TERMITES? 



Rode Man* 




SAratoga 61 18 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 
Raltimore 1, Md. 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 



MUlberry 2847 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 

COMPANY 

1623-29 AISQUITH ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 



TILE 



TERRAZZO 
MARBLE 

A. F. Pizza 



SLATE 



PL. 3554 911 E. Pratt St. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, INC. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 
Located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 1990 BALTO., MD. 




IN NEWFOUNDLAND 

Dr. Wesley M. Bagby (seated). University 
of Maryland representative to MacAndrew Air 
Force Base, Argentia, Newfoundland, has a 
small after-class discussion with three of his 
airmen-students. Doctor Bagby is Assistant 
Professor of History in the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies at MacAndrew AFB. 
He works in conjunction with the Air Force 
Educational Program, which offers to Air Force 
personnel the opportunity of continuing and 
furthering their educations while in the service. 
Doctor Bagby conducts classes in the History 
of American Civilization and the History of 
Russia for American servicemen and civilians 
attached to MacAndrew and nearby Argentia 
Naval Station. 



College of 



Special and 
Continuation 
Studies 



Cited for Korea Service 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL MILTON 
D. WEEKS, (CSCS '49, '50, '52) an 
off-duty time student at Maryland, was 
awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Oak- 
Leaf Cluster in recognition of his seven- 
teen months' distinguished service with 
the Signal Corps in Korea. 

The citation; "Lieutenant Colonel Mil- 
ton D. Weeks, 062128, Signal Corps, United 
States Army, distinguished himself by 
meritorious service as Commanding Offi- 
cer, 51st Signal Battalion, I Corps, in 
Korea, from 15 September 1950 to 22 De- 
cember 1951. Despite multifarious prob- 
lems created by personnel shortages, wide- 
ly dispersed echelons of command and 
exigencies of the tactical situation, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Weeks ably fulfilled all 
signal communications requirements for 
units of I Corps participating in the 
United Nations' offensive. By his rare 
ability to perceive all ramifications of a 
tactical situation and his rapid, efficient 
employment of all (dements of his com- 
mand. Lieutenant Colonel Weeks con- 
tributed significantly to the success of the 
Corps' operations in support of the United 
Nations' efforts in Korea, reflecting credit 
on himself and the military service." 

Lieutenant Colonel Weeks, an orphan, 
.joined the Army at 17. Six years later 
ho was commissioned a second lieutenant, 
and Lieutenant Colonel in 1950. 

At Leavenworth 

Lt. Col. Richard G. Risley is attending 
the Army Command and General Staff 



College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

He is one of 598 officers in the 10-month 
course representing every branch of the 
Armed Forces and 29 foreign nations. 

Risley attended Maryland's College of 
Special and Continuation Studies, '50-'51. 
He entered the Army in 1941. A veteran 
of World War II, he served in Europe 
from August 1944 to September 1945 and 
in Alaska from August 1947 to August 
1949. 

Among his decorations are the Combat 
Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Star 
Medal with oak leaf cluster, and the 
European-African-Middle Eastern Cam- 
paign Medal with bronze service stars for 
Northern France, Ardennes-Alsace, the 
Rhineland, and Central Europe. 

Police School 

The Maryland State Police Association, 
in cooperation with the University of 
Maryland's College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies and the University's 
police department, sponsored the recent 
"Police in Service School," which was 
attended by officials and officers of nine- 
teen police departments throughout the 
state and the District of Columbia. Among 
those on hand were Wilson G. Ford, J. F. 
Goddard, Sidney H. Herstine, Bernard 
Kalnaski, George H. Mays and John Sim- 
mons from Annapolis; William J. Colli- 
son from Edgewater; Lt. W. L. Brown 
from Ferndale; Sgt. Max Muller, Joseph 
Jager. William Armstrong, Charles Codd 
and Normand McCreer from Baltimore 
City; W. John Connolley and Mark D. 
Shears from the B. & O. R. R.;Roy C. 
House, Leo Law, and Police Commissioner 
John J. Long from Cumberland; Fleet- 
wood Carlson, Easton; Marvin Gulick, 
Edmonston; Robert L. Koontz, Emmits- 
burg; Charles Bare and Dilbert Harrison 
from Frederick. 

With 25th Division 

Maj. John E. Miller, who attended S 
&CS '51-'52. is serving in Korea as as- 
sistant adjutant general at headquarters 
of the 25th Infantry Division. A veteran 
of the Asiatic Pacific theater during World 
War II. he has been in Korea since last 
June. 

With KMAG 

Capt. Arthur T. Burke, who attended 
S&CS, '51-'52 is with the Korean Mili- 
tary Advisory Group (KMAG). 

He served during World War II with 
the Fifth Army in Italy and later with the 
State Department Foreign Liquidation 
Commission. 




AT HOMECOMING 

Old Grad: — "So I told some of these AF 
ROTC kids, as well as a few of these World 
War II Johnny-Come-Latelies about how fel- 
lows from my class smashed through at Sois- 
sons and Chateau Thierry " 

Older Grad: — "I could have told them about 
how our transport headed out of San Francisco 
for the Phillippines " 

O. G. : — "That was before Pearl Harbor?" 

O. O. G. : — "Lissen, Sonny, that was before 
Pearl White." 



[46] 



College of 




Dean Fraley 



Physical 
Education 
Recreation and 
Health 



Job Well Done 

SEVERAL trips to the Dominican Re- 
public, to further his work in expand- 
ing that country's program of physical 
activities for school children, were made 
during the past sum- 
mer by Dean Lester 
M. Fraley. 

He made a prelim- 
inary trip to the Re- 
public in early July to 
evaluate the country's 
progress in physical 
education. As a re- 
sult of this first study. 
President Trujillo of 
the Dominican Re- 
public inaugurated a 
nation-wide plan of 
school reorganization, 
which included for all schools, gymnasiums. 
basketball and volleyball courts, football 
and baseball fields and swimming pools. 

On the second trip. Dean Fraley and four 
members of his faculty conducted a three- 
week workshop to instruct approximately 
100 teachers of physical education in the 
small island country in the latest develop- 
ments of teaching physical education. 

Accompanying Dean Fraley were Doc- 
tors Benjamin H. Massey. "Warren R. John- 
son. Dorothy R. Mohr, and Janet A. Wes- 
sel. 

Dean Fraley was engaged by the Minis- 
ter of Education of the Republic to carry 
out on a scientific basis the reorganization 
of the schools' physical education, in which 
field the Maryland dean is a widely recog- 
nized authority. 

"Our workshop included a great number 
of subjects" Dean Fraley pointed out, "and 
we went down there to do a job which was 
quite a success. The people were eager to 
learn. We were anxious and happy to help 
them." 

With 1st Covolry 

Pvt. Harry R. Huffer, who attended the 
College of Physical Education, '50 to '51, 
is serving with the 1st Cavalry Division in 
Japan. 

One of the first American units rushed 
to Korea in 1950. now in training on the 
island of Hokkaido, less than four miles 
from Red-held territory. 

Private Huffer entered the Army in 
August '51. 

In Korea 

Capt. Charles W. Weidinger. (Phys Ed 
'40) is serving as supply officer in the office 
of the headquarters commandant of the 
UN Civil Assistance Command. 

A World War II veteran, Weidinger was 
called to active duty last year. 



r' 



^V^^t^V.^^!^^t^^<^V^V.^^^^^V^V^*^*^V.^^^^t^l^V^V^V.^V.4^t^'V_ < 5>V^-,. 






THE 

J. W. BUFFINGTON 

COMPANY 



WHOLESALE FOODS 



Established 1880 

Phone VErnon 4050 

1000-02 HILLEN ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



^t^K^^t^^<^5^^^( J ^.o^c^^t^x^5C^^t^^.t^^^^>^rK^^c^^^^.c^c^v^^t^^>«^^<^-.<^-x^x^x^^ 



igeabobp Consieroatorp of Jlugtc 

ANNOUNCES A NEW SERIES 

QTfje Canbleligfjt Concerts; 

Beautiful music of the 17th and 18th Centuries and some 
contemporary composers in the restful atmosphere of candlelight. 

SIX TUESDAY EVENINGS AT 8:30 

OCTOBER 14, 28 

NOVEMBER 11, 25 

DECEMBER 2, 16 

featuring— THE LITTLE ORCHESTRA (30 players) 

STEWART conducting 

with MARTIAL SINGHER, baritone: WILLIAM KROLL, violinist 

JOSE LIMON DANCE COMPANY and THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGERS. 

Season Tickets— $15.00, $13.50, $12.00 ON SALE AT 
Peabody Business Office — SA. 1351 Bonney Concert Bureau — LE. 3100 

21 E. Mt. Vernon Place, Baltimore 327 N. Charles St., Baltimore 




INSTITUTION 
PHYSICIANS' 
SURGEONS' 




HOSPITAL 
NURSES' AND 
LABORATORY 



Murray-Baumgartner Surgical Instrument Co., Inc. 

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

5 and 7 W. CHASE STREET BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

Telephone, SAratoga 733 3 



The 
WALKER-HASSLINGER 

RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

SERVING FINE FOODS FOR OVER HALF CENTURY 

1701-05 N. Charles St., Baltimore 

Closed Mondays Near Penn. Station 



Open noon 'til V p.m. 



VE 9410 




47] 



BALFOUR 



Fraternity Pins 
Maryland Class Rings 

JEWELRY NOVELTIES 

PROGRAMS FAVORS 

CRESTED STATIONERY 
MEDALS - CUPS - TROPHIES 

Phone: NAtional 1044 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

240 International Building 

1319 F Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



College of 



School of 



Education 



Law 



A. I.I IDE SONS 

COMPANY 

Nurseries 

Over 500 Acres 
ROCKVILLE, MD. 

Office & Landscape Dept. 

1318 EYE STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Phone: NAtional 6880 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 5918 Washington, D. C. 



£**t&*<tietex<f (£*., ^ttc. 

Our Specialty 

SCHOOL LETTERING 

BANNERS 

BOWLING SHIRTS 

905 EYE STREET, N.W. 
EX 3-1168 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



— Pat Scanlan '50 

"Army Brat" 

TRAVELING in Holland, France, Eng- 
land, Italy, Turkey, and Greece and 
living in Austria and Germany has been 
the main occupation of Nancy Pyle, junior 
in transferee from the University of Mary- 
land extension school in Munich, Germany. 

Miss P.yle, whose father is a colonel in 
the Army, also lived in Hawaii and Pana- 
ma. She has traveled over all 48 States. 

A nursery school major, she attended 
Maryland's day school in Munich. 

The main difference between Munich 
and College Park campuses is that no 
classes are held on Friday afternoons and 
Saturdays at Munich. Neither were there 
organized activities, with the exception of 
a basketball team and a bowling league. 

In Miss Pyle's opinion Germany is the 
most interesting place in which she has 
lived. She likes Bavaria. 

On the average the German people are 
not bitter towards Americans, she stated. 
However, she noticed a distinct difference 
between Germans living in the Allied sec- 
tors and ones living in the Russian zone. 
Germans under Russian influence, seem to 
be less prosperous than the ones in the 
Allied zones. 

While living in Germany Miss Pyle 
participated in bicycle tours of Holland 
and England. 

A native of Iowa. Miss Pyle has two sis- 
ters, one born in Hawaii and the other in 
Panama. 

In Korea 

Army 1st Lt. Wilmer L. Fox, (Educa- 
tion '50), is in Korea with the 7th Trans- 
portation Major Port. 

He is officer in charge of Headquarters 
Company, Annex No. 2. The 7th Port is 
the command organization for one of the 
major Korean harbors, where supplies and 
personnel are expedited for units at the 
front lines. 

Lieutenant Fox entered the Army in 
May 1951. 

A School in Rome 

Living in a new city for one year at a 
time has been the main occupation for the 
past ten years of Kit Embree, freshman, 
recipient of a four year scholarship from 
the Daughters of the Cincinnati. A native 
of Honolulu and daughter of a navy com- 
mander she has traveled extensively here 
and abroad. The most interesting place 
she has lived was Rome, where she at- 
tended a cooperative school conducted by 
the American parents. Originally an army 
school, any English speaking person is 
eligible to attend. Classes from the 
nursery level up to the last year of high. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Dr. Charles M. Eaker has been ap- 
pointed a group leader for Monsanto 
Chemical Company's Organic Chemicals 
Division, St. Louis. Eaker holds an A.B. 
degree ('41) from Central College and a 
Ph. D. ('46) in organic chemistry from 
Maryland. 




Amb. Sebald 



Ambassador To Burma 

ONE of this country's foremost diplo- 
mats, with a long and distinguished 
career in government service, is William J. 
Sebald, Ambassador to Burma. 
He graduated from the University of 
Maryland Law School 
in 1933 and received 
his Doctor of Laws 
from the same school 
in 1949. 

Well-known as a 
.. chief political advisor 
I ,-^A i M for the Supreme Com- 

pf J ^H mander of the Allied 

Powers in Japan since 
the end of World War 
II, Mr. Sebald has held 
more than a few high- 
ranking posts in the 
Japanese area. 
With MacArthur 
His first duties with SCAP came im- 
mediately after the cessation of hostilities 
in December, 1945, when he was appointed 
special assistant to General Douglas Mac- 
Arthur's political advisory staff. A U.S. 
Naval Academy graduate of 1922, he was 
enrolled in the Navy's Japanese language 
course from 1925 to 1928 which gave him 
excellent background for his oriental as- 
signments which followed. During the 
World War, he held the Navy rank of 
Captain. 

In Tokyo 
In July, 1947, he was appointed Foreign 
Service Officer at Tokyo. Later that same 
year, he assumed the chairmanship of the 
U.S. Allied Council for Japan. Soon there- 
after he was appointed chief of the Diplo- 
matic Section at SCAP by the President, 
and in October, 1948 received the rank of 
Minister. 

After serving as Head Political Advisor 
to SCAP headquarters in Japan for two 
years, he was elevated to the personal 
rank of Ambassador in 1950 and was ap- 
pointed to his present post as Ambassador 
to Burma in May of this year. 

He is the author of numerous texts and 
pamphlets on Japanese law, and has trans- 
lated many Japanese civil, criminal, and 
commercial codes, as well as several of that 
country's laws on taxation. 

• ••••••••• 

WISDOM OF SOLOMON? 

How about the one going the rounds m 
law circles about a judge's ruling that, in 
a divorce action property settlement, 
1 vt rything should be split right down the 
middle, one house to the wije, one to the 
husband. Two cars split the same way. 
Asked the wife, "How about the THREE 
kidsf" "Go back to him for a year or so," 
ml vised the judge, "and when you have an 
additional child, divide them two and 
two." 

"Your Honor," chirped the better half, 
"that's strictly no good. If I'd depended 
on that four flusher I wouldn't have the 
three I have." 



[48] 



School of 



Nursing 

Amy L. Wells '40 



MRS. BEVERLY C. CURTIS, Cincin- 
nati, 0., writes, "Having learned that 
the School of Nursing of the University 
of Maryland was founded by Louisa Par- 
sons, a graduate of Florence Nightingale's 
School in London and that Maryland grad- 
uate nurses are the only ones entitled to 
wear the Nightingale cap, I began search 
for the poem 'The Lady With the Lamp.' 
I could not find it? Can you help me?" 

The poem Mrs. Curtis seeks is Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow's "Santa Filo- 
mena," dedicated to Florence Nightingale. 
Readers usually remember it as "The Lady 
With the Lamp" altho it is not so titled. 

Santa Filomena was the patron Saint 
of nurses. In Pisa, Italy, a painting by 
Sabatelli represents the Saint as a beauti- 
ful, nymph-like figure, floating down from 
heaven, attended by angels bearing the 
lily, palm, and javelin. In the foreground 
are shown the sick and maimed, healed by 
Filomena. 

Might as well make a job of it and re- 
print "Santa Filomena," viz: — 

Whene'er a noble deed is wrought. 
Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, 
Our hearts, in glad surprise, 
To higher levels rise. 

The tidal wave of deeper souls 
Into our inmost being rolls, 
And lifts us unawares 
Out of all meaner cares. 

Honor to those whose words or deeds 
Thus help us in our daily needs, 
And by their overflow 
Raise us from what is low ! 

Thus thought I, as by night I read, 
Of the great army of the dead 
The trenches cold and damp, 
The starved and frozen camp. 

The wounded from the battle plain, 
In dreary hospitals of pain, 
The cheerless corridors 
The cold and stony floors. 

Lo, in that house of misery, 

A lady with a lamp I see 

Pass through the glimmering room, 

And flit from room to room. 

And slow, as in a dream of bliss, 
The speechless sufferer turns to kiss 
Her shadow, as it falls 
Upon the darkening walls. 

As if a door in heaven should be 
Opened and then closed suddenly, 
The vision came and went, 
The light shone and was spent. 

On England's annals, through the long 
Hereafter of her speech and song, 
That light its rays shall cast 
From portals of the past. 

A lady with a lamp shall stand 
In the great history of the land, 
A noble type of good, 
Heroic womanhood. 

Nor even shall a wanting here. 
The palm, the lily, and the spear, 
The symbols that of yore 
Saint Filomena bore. 





WRITE OR PHONE FOR ILLUSTRATED FOLDERS ON 



Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Central America 



Havana 

Hawaii 

Mediteranean 



Nassau 

Panama 

South America 




PHONE — Michigan 8700 



U1LD-UJIDE TRAVEL SERVICE CORP. 



2311 CALVERT ST., N.W. 



WASHINGTON 8, D.C. 



Washington s Finest Home Community 




OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY 

W. C. AND A. N. MILLER 

DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 

Builders and Developers of Wesley Heights, Sumner, and Spring Valley 

4860 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D. C. ORdway 4464 



ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 
(SCAGLIOLA) 



ARTIFICIAL 
TRAVERTINE STONE 



ARTIFICIAL STONE 
FOR INTERIOR 



STANDARD ART, MARBLE and TILE CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

SCAGLIOLA - MARBLE - MOSAIC - TERRAZZO 
TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 

117 D STREET, NORTHWEST • WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 

Telephones NAtional 7413-7414 



JACK MULLANE 

714 - llth STREET, N.W. 

MEtropolitan 9395 Washington, D. C. 



FOR HIRE 

Tuxedos - Full Dress - Cutaways - Caps 

Gowns - Hoods - Masquerade 

Costumes - Wigs - Theatrical 

Make-Up Supplies 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE. IT'S A GOOD INVESTMENT 



49] 



HELSING 
BROTHERS 

INCORPORATED 



PAVING 
CONTRACTORS 



4207 - 39th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C. 



ORdwoy 2231 



g>ci)rafft's; Cfjocolatt* 

Distributor — 
Edward Zupnik & Sons 

1307 Fourth St., N.E. 
TR. 6166 Washington, D. C. 



: oyuS> 



- u/vvcuxfai 



fVCCnvS; 



^IjdULxt* 



1105 F STREET, N.W.- 



I 



nvitation to 
Maryland Women 

This is the easy way to 
open your Charge Ac- 
count at Whelan's (the 
"exclusively women's" 
store). 

Mail to Whelan's, 1105 F, N.W 

Please Open A Charge Account for Me! 



Full Name (please print) 

Home Address 

Other Charge Accounts (if any) 



Bonk (Branch) 



Your Signature 
Foundations • Bras • Lingerie • Gifts 





April — Cohen 

NANCY APRIL to Sergt. Phillip 
Cohen, USAF. Sergt. Cohen attended 
Maryland. 

Be r man Karpo 

Helene Lois Berman to Morton Karpa. 
Mr. Karpa attended Maryland. 

Brooks — Hall 

Mary Ann Brooks, Sacred Heart and 
Holton Arms, to Private Charles C. Hall, 
Maryland Alumnus. 

Bradley-Colteryahn 
Peggy Lee Bradley, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, to Lloyd K. Colteryahn, star 
offensive end on Maryland's football team. 

Capeh art -Pearson 
Both Maryland alumni, Patricia Louise 
Capehart, Alpha Omicron Pi, daughter of 
Senator and Mrs. Homer E. Capehart of 
Indiana, to James C. Pearson. President, 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

C lough — Lawhon 

Jean Clough to Nelson D. Lawhon. 

The bride-elect has been attending 
Maryland; Kappa Alpha Theta. Mr. Law- 
hon was graduated from Maryland, (BPA 
'52). 

Davis — Pierce 

Lillian Rae Davis to Ronald H. Pierce. 
Both are students at Maryland. 

The bride-elect is enrolled in the College 
of Physical Education, '54 ; Delta Gamma. 
Mr. Pierce is a journalism major, '53; 
Delta Sigma Phi. 

Davis — Walker 

Alice Patricia Davis to Richard David 
Walker. 

The bride-elect is now a senior at Mary- 
land. Mr. Walker will be graduated from 
Mai viand in June; Phi Kappa Sigma. 

Deckelbaum — Pastor 

Jean Deckelbaum to Pvt. Samuel 
Pastor. Private Pastor attended Maryland. 

Dimmitt — Lewis 

Marion Joan Dimmitt to Edward Wil- 
liams Lewis. Jr. 

The bride-elect received her master's 
degree from Maryland. 

Duncan — Yeager 

Nancy Lou Duncan to John William 
Yeager, Jr. Mr. Yeager attended Mary- 
land. 

Everatt — Hazel 

Francis Louise Everatt, Colby Junior 
College, to H. Kenneth Hazel, Maryland; 
Kappa Alpha. 

Fitch — White 

Doris Jean Fitch, George Washington, 
to Rollie H. White, Jr., Maryland. 



By RONNIE PIERCE 

Foster — Balmer 

Diane Foster, A&S '53, to John Balmer, 
BPA '52. now 2nd Lt. in USAF at Tinker 
AFB, Okla. 

Goldberg — Blau 

Carol Marie Goldberg to Paul Raoul 
Blau. Mr. Blau studied at Maryland be- 
fore being recalled to active duty with 
the Air Force in 1951. 



Gram bow — Kneussl 

Joan Esther Grambow to James Ken- 
neth Kneussl. Jr. 

The bride-elect is in her senior year at 
Maryland ; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Hamilton — Crandall 

Patricia Ann Hamilton to Clifford J. 
Crandall. 

The bride-to-be is a senior at Maryland; 
Sigma Kappa. 

Huff — Teegarden 

Annis Carolyn Huff. Tri-Delt. Maryland, 
to James C. Teegarden. Indiana Univers- 
ity, Kappa Delta Rho. and M.A. Mary- 
land. 

Lovless — Cameron 

Janet Gordon Lovless to Lt. Steven 
Francis Cameron, Jr., U. S. A. Lt. Cameron 
attended Maryland. 

Morrisey Williams 

Margaret Morrisey to William Barron 
Williams. The bride-elect is a graduate 
of Maryland. 

Perez — Mondonedo 

Amelita Perez, Philippine Embassy, to 
Mariano M. Mondonedo. Maryland grad- 
uate and law student, formerly University 
of the Philippines. 

Prat her — Spring 

Esther Margaret Prather to Lt. Arthur 
Hans Spring. Lt. Spring is a graduate of 
Maryland; (AG. '51), and member of Phi 

Sigma Kappa. 

Rowe — Rosser 

Ellen Lorena Rowe to Marion Thomas 
Rosser, Jr. Mr. Rosser attended Maryland. 

Saffron — Houpt 

Mary Jane Saffran to William P. Houpt. 

Mr. Houpt is a graduate of Loyola 
College and is presently attending the 
Maryland School of Medicine. 

Sandler — Hanock 
Marjorie Elaine Sandler to Corpl. 
Ronald E. Hanock. Miss Sandler attended 
Maryland. 

Schlein — Steinberg 

Janet Lee Schlein to Samuel J. Stein- 
berg. The bride-elect attended Maryland, 
Pennsylvania State College, and is now 
studying in George Washington Univers- 
ity. Mr. Steinberg received his B.S. from 
Maryland. 



[50] 



Sloan — Cohen 

Florence Sloan to Marvin Cohen. Mr, 
Cohen is a pre-medical student at Mary- 
land. 

Toy lor — Brafford 

Barbara Jean Taylor to Samuel Grady 
Brafford, Jr. The bride-to-be is a student 
at Maryland; Delta Gamma. 

Mr. Brafford was graduated from Gordon 
Military Academy in Georgia and is also 
a student at Maryland; Delta Tan Delta. 

von Briesen — Sweeney 

Jean Ann von Briesen to William F. C. 
Sweeney. Mr. Sweeney is a graduate of 
Maryland. 

Wollersrein — Derkay 

Gloria Ann Wallerstein to Lee Perry 
Derkay. The bride-elect is a student at 
the University of Maryland; Phi Sigma 
Sigma. 

The prospective bridegroom will grad- 
uate from Maryland; Tau Epsilon Phi in 
February. 

Welch — Young 

Emalea Elizabeth Welch to Lieut. An- 
drew F. Young, Jr., USAF. The bride-elect 
attended Maryland, her fiance also at- 
tended Maryland, receiving his B. S. 
degree. 



1\w ,TSY • B,n " SY <*u 



"Little Andy" 

MR. and Mrs. Lynwood Anderson, of 
1201 Baker Avenue. Catonsville, an- 
nounce the birth of a baby son May 16, 
Lynwood Pershing Anderson, Jr. Mrs. 
Anderson was the former Miss Helen 
Nuse, School of Nursing, '49. 

Cobey Team Gains Mascot 

The arrival of a 10 pound baby boy 
made it a half dozen youngsters at the 
home of Maryland's Graduate Manager 
of Athletics, William W. Cobey, '31, and 
Mrs. Cobey, as well as an even division of 
boys and girls, three of each. Sort of 
well-balanced line. 

The little fellow, named Gray Monroe, 
joins Mary Patricia, age 15, William W., 
Jr., 13.. Julia Anne, 12, Betty, 9. and 
Elwood. 6. 

Tiny Terpette 

A future Terpette, Martha Crystal Stil- 
son, was born on August 6, at Goldsboro, 
N. C. Weight: 7 lbs. 10 ozs. 

The proud parents are Mr. Lewis F. 
Stilson, A & S '52 and Phi Sigma Kappa, 
and Helen Hall Stilson, B P A '50. 

Two for Karl 

Karl Fasick (A&S '50), President of the 
Now England Alumni Club, and Promo- 
tion Director for Loew's Theaters, Boston, 
announces arrival of twin boys on August 
16. 

Cheerleader, '70 

A 1970 candidate for cheerleader arrived 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Ice of 
Seaford, Del. Her name is Margaret Anne. 
Both parents are Maryland graduates. 



IS A 

CROP 

TIMBER 




is 
HOMES 

The Harvest 



GOOD LUMBER PROPERLY USED NEVER FAILS! 

SILVER SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO, 

Established 1922 
LUMBER MILLWORK 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



PITTSBURG PAINTS 



Georgia Avenue and Ripley Street 
Silver Spring, Md. 



WASHINGTON. 



SILVER SPRING 



Take The Road To Stone House Inn 

THE MARYLAND ROOM %r^Mfll&$&!§^ 4%i^ " 

' ,0;V;--- _ i.jJJ— !■ Ill Hi' iMil/ '■* -^.^- -3. -*U= **"' 

where smart people gather for 
delicious food and a delightful 
atmosphere 

DINING AT ITS BEST 

Table d'hote — Lunch — Dinner and 
a la carte services . . . choice 
food and service 



Banquets - Parties - Luncheons 

HIGHWAY 29 -:- FOUR CORNERS, SILVER SPRING -:- SHEPHERD 4198 
U. of MARYLAND BETHESDA 





PHON€ Sir 4562 



ENGRAVING CO. 



969 T«AV€R AVE- SILVER SPRING MD*, 



PHOTOENGRAVERS OF 

FINE LINE, BENDAY, HALFTONE AND COLOR PRINTING PLATES 
ON ZINC, COPPER AND TRIPLEMETAL 



The Citizens Bank of Takoma Park 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Takoma Park, Maryland 



51 



TORO'S 76" 

Professional Power Mower 

Used on Maryland's Campus 

and Many Other State and 

County Institutions 




COMPLETE LAWN & 

MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT 

From 18" to 76" 

CALL FOR DEMONSTRATION 
AUTHORIZED SERVICE DEPT. 

JUniper 7-7800 

NATIONAL 
CAPITAL TORO, Inc. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 




xp> 



d5loSAom l^arade 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 

ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



MODERN 
REALTY CO. 

REALTORS - INSURANCE 

Specializing in 
Montgomery Co. Property 

JU: 7-5350 
9719 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Becker — Nezin 

ETTA NEZIN to Martin Becker. Mrs. 
Becker was graduated from Maryland. 

Barret — Linthicum 
Virginia Adele Linthicum to William 
Nelson Barret, Jr. The bridegroom, a 
graduate of Maryland. 

Coffman — Briesmeister 

Helen Wilhelmina Briesmeister to Wil- 
liam Buchanan Coffman. Mr. Coffman re- 
ceived his Master's degree from Maryland. 

Cottrell — Henkelmon 

Gloria Charlotte Henkelman to Lens- 
worth Cottrell. The bride was graduated 
from Maryland; Alpha Kappa Delta. 

Mr. Cottrell is a alumnus of Maryland 
and received his master's degree from 
Catholic university. 

Dew — Wright 

Norma Elizabeth Wright to Donald 
Dew. The groom graduated from Mary- 
land. 

Eisenman — Kitchen 

Mary Elizabeth Kitchen, Marj'land 
Alumna, Delta Gamma, to Lieutenant 
Richard L. Eisenman, USAF, former Math 
Instructor at Maryland. 

Emmons — Kehne 

Ellen Frances Kehne to Wesley William 
Emmons, Jr. Mrs. Emmons received her 
Bachelor of Science from Maryland, '52; 
Delta Gamma. 

Ford — Hickman 

Gertrude Ann Hickman to Samuel 
Caldwell Ford. The bridegroom was grad- 
uated from Maryland. 

Flanery — Wilbert 

Patricia Anne Wilbert, Holy Cross and 
Immaculata, to William E. Flanery, Mary- 
land Alumnus now in the Navy. 

Major Fields Married 

Major T. M. "Tommy" Fields, USMC 
('41 Educ), was married on the 24th of 
July and spent his honeymoon at Sea 
Island. Georgia. He is now at Fort Ben- 
ning. Well remembered for his track 
exploits. The Major failed to name the 
bride. 

Gallegos — Long 

Jaimie Izil Long to Eleuterio Gallegos. 
The bride was graduated from Stephens 




WELL, THAT'S A HELP! 

"I knew what I was doing when I bought 
Terpy that useful toy! He's going right over 
to the campus now to join George Weber's grass 
cutters. 



college and Maryland; Kappa Alpha 
Theta. 

Herdt — Fenton 

Anne Elizabeth Fenton to Douglas 
Merrill Herdt. The bride graduated from 
Maryland. 

Mr. Herdt, a graduate of Maryland, is 
doing advanced work in the University of 
New Mexico School of Meteorology. 

Hessler — Griesemer 

Helen Lois Griesemer to Brian J. Hess- 
ler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hessler formerly attended 
Maryland, Mr. Hessler receiving his de- 
gree. 

Hobson — Rogon 

Betty Jane Rogan to William C. Hob- 
son. 

The bride is a graduate of Maryland; 
Tri Delt. Mr. Hobson is a graduate of 
Maryland; Alpha Tau Omega. 

Kershner — Culp 

Mary Elizabeth Culp to Dr. Alan Mot- 
ter Kershner. Doctor Kershner received 
his doctorate from Maryland. 

Kirk— Wood 

Virginia Mae Wood to Walter Hobson 
Kirk, Jr. 

The bridegroom was graduated from 
both Maryland and Bob Jones Universities. 

Klosky — McDonnell 

Rita Marie McDonnell to Philip Mi- 
chael Klosky. Mr. Klosky attended Mary- 
land. 

K rank ling — Graham 

Margaret Dawes Graham to James 
David Krankling. Mr. Krankling did grad- 
uate work at Maryland. 

Lunceford — Myers 

Lois Ann Myers to Bennett Ray Lunce- 
ford. 

Both the bride and the bridegroom at- 
tended Maryland; Sigma Kappa. 

Lucas — Faweett 

Laura Lee Faweett, Washington School 
for Secretaries, to Russell C. Lucas, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Macrae — Wyatt 

Laura Belle Wyatt to Bruce Farquhar 
Macrae. The bridegroom attended Wayne 
University and Maryland. 

McLane — Ellis 

Phyllis Ann Ellis to Donald Cecil Mc- 
Lane, Jr. The bride attended Richmond 
Professional Institute and Maryland. 

Mellor-Oyster 

Schuyler L. Mellor, Maryland alumnus 
and World War II veteran, to Jane Hollins 
Oyster, granddaughter of District of 
Columbia Commissioner Jas. F. Oyster. 
The bride is a graduate of Washington 
College. 

Minnick — Great house 

Rosemary Greathouse, Maryland alum- 
na; Phi Kappa Phi, to G. Richard Min- 
nick, Maryland's School of Dentistry; Psi 
Omega. 

Murphy— Kelly 

Verna Mae Kelly, Maryland alumna, 
Gamma Phi Beta, to James L. Murphy, 
Wesley College, of Dublin, and University 
of Southampton, England. 



52 



Nolan — McQuade 
Esther Kinsman McQuade to Robert 
Francis Nolan. Mr. Nolan earned his Mas- 
ter's degree at Maryland; Delta Tan 
Delta. 

Perkins — Park 
Mary Ellen Park to Charles Henry Per- 
kins. Mr. Perkins is an alumnus of Mary- 
land. 

Ravitz — Blair 
Ruth Blair to Leonard Ravitz. 
Mr. Ravitz will complete his studies 
for a Ph.D. degree at Maryland. 

Schuman — Sisson 

Kathleen Elizabeth Sisson to Lieut. Wil- 
liam John Schuman, Jr., U. S. A. F. 

The bridegroom received his commission 
and graduated from Maryland in June. 

Shiowitz — Lurie 

Ruth Lurie to Marc Shiowitz. 

The bride attended Maryland and is 
now enrolled in the University of South- 
ern California. 

Smith — Carr 

Anne Carr to Charles Smith. 

The bride is a graduate of Maryland, 
which Mr. Smith also attended. 

Smith — Smith 

Dorothy Lee Smith, Holton Arms Junior 
College, to Rodney C. Smith, Maryland's 
School of Law. 

Webster — Hering 

Bettie Lou Hering to Joel S. Webster. 

He has received his B.S. from Maryland 
and is in his senior year at the Maryland 
medical school. 

Wett — Dilsosso 

Elizabeth Anna Dilsasso to Lieut. John 
F. Wett, Jr. 

Mrs. Wett is a graduate of Maryland. 

Williams — Morrissey 

Margaret Peteler Morrissey to William 
Barron Williams. The bride was graduated 
from Maryland. 

Wisdom — Martin 

Ada Jane Martin to William Arthur 
Wisdom. 

Mrs. Wisdom attended Maryland. Mr. 
Wisdom attended Maryland. 

Wolfel — Bossier 

Grace Florence Bassler to William E. 
Wolfel, Jr. 

The bride is a 1950 graduate of the 
Maryland School of Nursing. The groom 
attended Maryland, and at the present is 
a senior at the Maryland School of Den- 
tistry, Baltimore. 

Young — Kastner 

Mary Louise Kastner, daughter of Brig- 
adier General Alfred E. Kastner, Ft. Hood, 
Texas, to Carl L. Young, Maryland senior. 

Zimmerman — Jacobson 

Marlene Iris Jacobson to Richard Marc 
Zimmerman. She is a graduate of Mount 
Vernon Seminary and attended Maryland. 

Zyblut — Rush 

Betty Lee Rush to Chester Anthony 
Zyblut. 

The former Miss Rush is a graduate of 
Maryland; Pi Beta Phi. 



Barrett 

PARKER J4air5tylist5 

SLigo 3997 AIR CONDITIONED 

SHepherd 9804 8406 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 




Get Acquainted with . . . 

QUAINT ACRES NURSERY 

ON THE COLESVIUE PIKE (U.S. 29) 

Complete Landscape Service 

HARDY NURSERY STOCK FOR FALL PLANTING 
5 Miles from Georgia Ave. 

JUniper 9-5810 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



WILSON PONTIAC, Inc. 

Silver Spring's Oldest Automobile Agency — Established 1935 

Pontiac Sales • Service • Parts 

7925 GEORGIA AVE. Opposite Hot Shoppe SILVER SPRING, MD. 



The 
Gift 


Perfecf 


Js% 


1 


YOUR 


PORTRAIT 

by 




1 



PORTRAIT & COMMERCIAL 
Custom Picture Framing 
STUDIO— 914 THAYER AVE. 

JU: 9-1517 Silver Sprin g 



SUBURBAN 
WATERPROOFING CO. 

Specializing in 

Waterproofing Basements 

BELOW GROUND 

Waterproofing Masonry 

ABOVE GROUND 

Call HENRY EADER. JU. 7-7695 

2814 Linden Lane 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE 

MONROE 

1237 East West Hgwy 



s®rd> 



^y-ineil ^jrord Service 

COMPANY 

Silver Spring, Md. 



INSURED SAVINGS 



Earn Liberal Dividends 

Citizens Bldg. & Loan 

Pershing & Fenton Silver Spring 




WISE OWL 



Potato Chips 

Distributors 

10753 Coles vi lie Road 
Silver Spring, Md. 



HSb Silver Spring Piano Co. 



FAMOUS MAKES — New and Used 
SPINETS CONSOLES GRANDS UPRIGHTS 

857 Pershing Drive SH. 6338 Silver Spring, Md. 




Terms Arranged 



53 



WALTER C. DOE 
& COMPANY 



Ciectricai 
(_- on tra ctord 



602 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 

REpublic 1223 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION 

WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

MEtropolitan 1520 

1023 12th St., N.W. Washington 



9 



A 



»> 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



ENJOY OUR DELICIOUS FOOD 
PIZZA 

Our Specialty 
1837 M. STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Off Connecticut Avenue 



Union Welding Co. 

ELECTRIC & ACETYLENE 

ALL METALS WELDED 

We make anything out of metal 

Rear 2231 8th St., N.W. 

DUpont 9894 Washington 



®apH 



Dr. Newdigate M. Owensby 

NEWDIGATE M. OWENSBY, M.D., 
(U. M. Med. '04), nationally known 
Atlanta, Ga., psychiatrist died there after 
a brief illness. 

He took post-graduate studies in Lon- 
don, Edinburgh, Berlin, Munich, Vienna 
and Paris. 

During World War I, Dr. Owensby 
served as a lieutenant colonel in the Army 
Medical Corps. Shortly after his service 
ended he began his practice in Atlanta. 

In 1935 he founded the Southern Psychi- 
atric Association, which now has the mem- 
bership of some of the most outstanding 
psychiatrists in the Southeast. 

Dr. Owensby was the first psychiatrist 
in the United States to use metrazol shock 
therapy. He administered the treatment 
with remarkable success to a series of pa- 
tients in 1937 at the Georgia Baptist Hos- 
pital. 

He was formerly chief psychiatrist of 
Bay View Asylum, Baltimore; assistant in 
psychiatry and clinical demonstrator in 
neurology, Johns Hopkins Medical School; 
lecturer in psychiatry and neurology, Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medicine; 
professor of psychiatry and neurology, 
L T niversity of Baltimore School of Medi- 
cine; visiting professor of psychiatry, Uni- 
versity of Georgia School of Medicine; 
neuropsychiatrist, Medical Officers Train- 
ing School, Fort Oglethorpe; councillor of 
the American Psychiatric Association, and 
consultant in psychiatry to the Lmited 
States Public Health Service. 

Dr. Owensby is survived by his wife, the 
former Miss Edna Harrison of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Colonel Chas. H. Jones 

Colonel Charles H. Jones, 62, USA (ret.) 
a veteran of both world wars and for four 
years an instructor of ROTC at the U. 
of Md., died unexpectedly Sept. 4th at 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

Col. Jones, who had lived for the past 
seven years at 6503 Queens Chapel Road, 
University Park, Md., suffered a heart 
attack. 

He and Mrs. Jones 
had left the Washing- 
ton area by plane to 
visit friends in Fort 
Collins and Belling- 
ham, Wash. He was 
retired in 1947. 

Col. Jones was born 
June 22, 1890, in Pipe- 
stone, Minn. He at- 
tended the U. of Min- 
nesota before entering 
the Army in 1916. 
He was a graduate 
of the Command and General Staff School, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and of the 
Army War College. 

During World War II he commanded 
the 19th Infantry Regiment of the Twent}-- 
fourth Division in Australia and New 
Guinea. 

Back in Washington on leave, he was 
ordered to Walter Reed Hospital, suffer- 
ing from anemia, and later was assigned 




Col. Jones 



to the general staff of the Army Ground 
Forces, at the War College. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Rose 
C. Jones; a daughter, Mrs. Rose J. Fug- 
itt (U. of Md. class of 1940) #6 Man- 
chester PL, Silver Spring, Md.; three son- 
Capt. Robert W. (also attended Md.) 
4526 Albion Rd., College Park, Md.; Lt. 
Col. Lewis A., USMC (U. of Md. class 
of 1939) now assigned Camp Pendleton, 
Calif., and Charles H, Jr., (U. of Md. class 
of 1947) 3305 S. 6th St., Arlington, Va., 
and a brother, Lewis A., 7131 Chestnut 
St., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Robert is stationed at the Pentagon, 
is married and has a daughter 10 yrs. old 
and a son 1 yr. 

Lewis, or Pete as every one calls him, 
just returned in August from Korea, is 
married and has a son 2% and a daughter 
1 yr. Charles, Jr., is Supervisor of Pas- 
senger Service for United Airlines at Na- 
tional Airport. He married Phyllis 
Brooks, U. of Md. class of '47 or '48. He 
has two girls age 5 and 1. Mrs. Fugitt 
has a daughter 7 yrs. old. 

Colonel Jones was buried in Arlington 
National Cemeterv. 



Barn) Watts 

By Crantland Rice 

iftftY friend is sleeping — please walk 
JlTl quietly by. 
Do not disturb his dreams — nor cheek 

his rest. 
For he has earned his right, through 

song and sigh, 
To find the golden sweetness of the blest. 
I mean the endless silence of the years, 
Beyond the span of suffering and tears. 

Old Charon in his barque on life's rough 

swell 
Has called my pals to find the journey's 

end. 
But he has called none that I loved as 

well, 
One I can call a gentleman — and friend. 
An endless sadness gathers from God's 

sky — 
The Umpire called him out — I wonder 

why? 



Harry Dorsey Watts, Engineering ('01,), was 
Cajttain and fullback on Maryland's football team 
of 1903, was President and Chairman of the 
Board of James Stewart and Company New York 
Engineers, one of the largest construction and 
contracting concerns in America. 

He had recently been elected President of the 
Southern Society of New York. 



Dr. Ardie W. Gregory 

Ardie W. Gregory, (D.D.S., U. Md., '26), 
who had practiced dentistry in Baltimore 
since his graduation, died after an illness 
of three weeks. 

Dr. Gregory was born in Webster 
Springs, W. Va., in 1903. He was the assist- 
ant deputy councillor of Psi Omega Fra- 
ternity, a member of the council of the 
Baltimore City Dental Society, a Mary- 
land State Dental Association delegate to 
the American Dental Association and as- 
sociate dental surgeon at the Harriet Lane 
Home of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. 



54' 



Besides his wife, Mrs. Marie E. Gregory, 
he is survived by three brothers — Roy, 
Oakie and Olen Gregory, all of Webster 
Springs, and by two stepsons — Dr. Ver- 
non T. Hart and Theodore ('.. Hart, of 
Baltimore. 

Dr. Anthony J. Rytina 

Dr. Anthony J. Rytina. 70. a graduate 
of Maryland Medical School, and noted 
Baltimore physician and surgeon died re- 
cently at the Kent and Queen Anne's 
General Hospital in Chestertown. Dr. 
Rytina had been suffering from a heart 
condition for several years. 

During his long career he was connected 
with Johns Hopkins Hospital and other 
institutions of the city, and was chief 
urologist on the Mercy Hospital staff. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Kath- 
erine M. Rytina: a daughter. Mrs. Robert 
Dalaunev : and a son. Anthony J. Rytina, 
Jr. 

Second Lr. Fred S. Hayes 

Second Lt. Fred S. Hayes, Jr.. 23, (Agr. 
'50) died in action in Korea on September 
22. He had been in Korea since July. 

Lt. Hayes was killed eight days after 
returning to the lines from a hospital in 
Japan. He had been in the hospital three 
weeks recovering from shrapnel wounds. 

A platoon leader in Company G, 27th 
Regiment, of the 25th Infantry Division, 
Lt. Hayes had been in the Army since 
July. 1951. 

The young officer had been prominent 
in 4-H work and had won many prizes 
for cattle judging. His parents own a 
large dairy farm at Barnesville. 

Besides his parents, he is survived by 
two sisters. An uncle, Dr. Leonard Hayes, 
Hyattsville, is on the staff of Prince 
Georges Count y Hospital. 

W. Scon Whiteford 

W. Scott Whiteford, Ag. '42, Harford 
County, died on Sept. 21 as a result of 
an automobile accident. He was President 
of the Whiteford Packing Company and 
was known for his energy, exceptional 
ability, and his many friends. He was a 
member of Alpha Gamma Rho, and the 
son of the late Clay P. Whiteford and 
Marion Stubbs Whiteford. He is survived 
by his wife, Opal Linkous, and a seven 
year old daughter Cynthia. Services were 
held at Slateville. 

W. R. Seamons 

William R. Seamans '24 Law of Balti- 
more, a former President of the City Bar 
Association, died on July 29. He was long 
active in political affairs of the State and 
in 1948 was appointed by the Federal Civil 
Service Commission to the Regional 
Loyality Board. He is survived by his 
wife, the former Ann Robert Thomas, and 
two sons, William R. and Truman C. 
Seamans. 

Walter N. Miner 

Dr. Walter N. Miner. 1898 Medicine, 
passed away in July 1948. Notice of his 
death failed to appear in an earlier issue 
of "MARYLAND" and it is now pub- 
lished for the benefit of his many friends. 
Dr. Miner from Calais, Maine had his 
own fifty-two bed hospital which he do- 
nated to the city upon his retirement from 
active practice. He is survived by his wife. 





The George Hyman 
Construction Co. 






ENGINEERS 


& 






CONTRACTORS 










1010 VERMONT AVE., N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 








INCORPORATED 



ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 



REpublic 1343 



2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 



WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 





WALLOP 


and 


SON 






J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Class of 1919 


j. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, 
Class of 1942 


3rd 






• 1 NSURANCE 


• 






Fire 


Automobile - Life 


Accident 


Liability 


Bonds 






EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 






Suite 405, 


1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W. 


Executive 3- 


1400 WASHINGTON 5, 


D.C. 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE. ITS A GOOD INVESTMENT 



[55; 




Paul W. Phillips 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 



SUDLERSVILLE 
MARYLAND 



East Coast 
Marketers Inc. 

Exclusive Sales Agents 

for 

SHORELAND FREEZERS, INC. 

TRAPPE FROZEN FOODS CORP. 

FROZEN FOODS 
P. O. Box 566 Salisbury, Md. 




* ewiuthina $FA KK LE* 



SALISBURY 



CRISFIELD 



BERLIN 



Paul V. Downing 

PAVING CONTRACTOR 

Asphalt • Concrete 

Estimotes Furnished 
upon request 

Phone 7590 
SALISBURY, MD. 




FOOTBALL 

6 for 6, Terps take Missouri, Auburn, 
Clemson, Georgia, Navy, L.S.U. 



ARYLAND'S football 
team, tabbed all the way 
from "too tense" to "too 
cocky" in defeating Mis- 
souri and Auburn, snap- 
ped in to outclass Clem- 
son and topped that by 
reducing Georgia's unde- 
feated bulldogs to the potent viciousness 
of a toy schipperke. Against Wally Butts' 
crew at Athens the Terps were the '51 
Sugar Bowlers. Scintillant Jack Scarbath 
looked even better than he did way down 
yonder in New Orleans, and was better 
still as the Tatumterps outclassed Navy 
and L.S.U. 

Maryland 13; Missouri 10 

Wow! That '52 opener was close. Terps 
13; Mizzou Tigers 10. 

"We had a good team in there," com- 
mented Maryland Coach Jim Tatum, 
"They did better than I expected them 
to. We were just up against a very fine 
Missouri team." 

"Missouri had a good team in there." 
Echoed Coach Don Fourot, "The deciding 
factor was that Maryland had Scarbath." 

Going into the shadows of the afternoon 
it looked like the first big upset of the 
year, with Terp hopes moanin' low. 

In the second quarter Missouri, with 
Rowenkamp, one of "those" ex- West 
Pointers starring, got a real break after 
successfully passing downfield. Missouri's 
Scardino aimed a pass at Jennings. Bernie 
Faloney knocked it down and it bounced 
squarely into a surprised Missourian, 
Makin. He fell across the line with it. 
The boot made it 7 — 0, with the Terps 
on the wrong end. Then Maryland held 
until another brilliant pass put the Tigers 
near the pay window. The Terps held 
but on the fourth try Missouri's Fuchs 
booted a field goal, the first for Mizzou 
since '45. 

It stayed 10 — until the last quarter. 
The Terps had missed their chance at a 
field goal and another break, when the 
Terps' Crytzer knocked down a Missouri 
pass only to have it bounce right into 
the arms of Rowenkamp. 

Into the fourth it looked bad until Jack 
Scarbath got "right" with two brilliant 
passes. The first one was a wide pitch- 
out to Felton who drove 15 yards to score. 

The crowd was filing out toward the 
finish. It looked like sunset on Paint 
Branch. Then Scarbath rose to the occa- 
sion. After a sortie of faking and feinting 
he banged a fast pass to Lloyd Colteryahn 
who raced through Missouri tacklers to 
score. The whistle blew and the Terps 
oontzed out with the final tally 13 — 10. 

Actually the Maryland defense set up 
the win. The Terps held at critical times. 
Smashing tackles by the Terp defense also 
counted and a pass interception by Mary- 
land's Dick Nolan contributed to putting 
the Terps back into the ball game. Mary- 
land outplayed Missouri over the ground. 
211 to 62 yards. The Tigers showed 143 
yards in passes to Maryland's 112. But 
the Terp passes had score board numbers 



on 'em. Like in baseball, the greater num- 
ber of hits are no good unless you bunch 
'em. The Terps bunched 'em this time. 
Maryland 13; Auburn 7 

After Maryland, in spite of really bad 
breaks all afternoon and "almost" touch- 
downs within kissing distance of the goal 
line, again came from behind to defeat a 
sparked and inspired Auburn team at Bir- 
mingham, one of the Terp faithful mut- 
tered through chattering teeth and bitten 
lips, "I wish our boys would win one that 
isn't served up with a double ration of 
apoplexy and aspirin." As the score de- 
tails of the horrendous melee way down 
upon the Swanee River came in to the old 
folks at home, it was generally opined that 
Auburn had provided one of the biggest 
scares since the last time the Anacostia 
Indians came up Paint Branch in war 
canoes. 

Going into the final quarter it was 7 — -6, 
the Dixie Plainsmen ahead. Scarbath, who 
had had a bad afternoon with below-Scar- 
bath par passing, while interceptions and 
fumbles proved extremely costly, once 
again proved to be a great quarterback 
and clutch player. In the pinch he had 
it under Teddy Roosevelt's time-honored 
axiom, "Only the shots that HIT count!" 

The Tatumterps went 56 yards in eight 
plays for a first-quarter touchdown, fol- 
lowing a pass interception by Faloney who 
returned the ball 12 yards, lateraled to 
Fullerton, who was stopped on the Mary- 
land 44. 

Scarbath passed to Colteryahn for 24. 
Hanulak, Fullerton, Felton and Scarbath 
alternated as ball carriers to the Auburn 
eight, from where Scarbath scored. 

Auburn came back without losing the 
ball in a 65-yard push. Bill Maletzky took 
a fumble in the air and ran 63 yards for 
what would have been a touchdown, but 
it was nixed by the Terps being offside. 

Maryland came within less than a yard 
of taking the lead at the half. The Terps 
marched 89 yards with Scarbath passing, 
running and calling the plays. As Terp 
players yelled for "Time out" to get in 
that one more play, the half ended. It 
was tough all over that afternoon. 

In the 4th, Colteryahn scored the win- 
ning touchdown on a 32-yard pass play, 
with Scarbath on the tossing end. It 
started as a pitchout to the right. Auburn's 
defense moved to the left. Suddenly Col- 
teryahn broke suddenly to his left, caught 
the ball on the 21 and wasn't hit until he 
was knocked down crossing the goal line. 
Decker, who missed the first extra point, 
made the second. 

A big man in throttling Auburn was 
Dick Modzelewski, who time and again 
broke through and threw Quarterback 
Dooley (And is he a honey!) on first 
down. 

Tatum's alert team had defensive stars 
in the secondary, in Faloney and Fuller- 
ton, who played the entire game except 
for one set of downs. 

Auburn's only touchdown of the day 
followed brilliant work by Dooley. He 
was the whole show in taking the ball to 
the Maryland 25. Trapped, he tossed a 
pass to Hataway. From there Dooley took 
it over on 4th down. 

Auburn was outplayed most of the way. 
However, 27.000 fans had every right to 
envision an upset as Auburn made a par- 
ticularly brilliant showing and was rated 



56 



by the Terps as tougher than Missouri for 
this day at least. 

Maryland 28; Clemson 

Maryland's third game for '52 and first 
appearance of the season at College Park, 
.-aw the Tatumterps, brilliantly sparked 
and piloted by Jack Scarbath, shake off 
what was variously termed as "over- 
tenseness," "lethargy," "cockiness" and 
what will the boys in the back room have. 
They completely outclassed a good Clem- 
son team, 28 to 0, Coach Howard opining 
that the big break against Clemson came 
last September when he signed to play 
the Terps. 

After two quick touchdowns most of the 
Terp second and third stringers got their 
chances. 

Hilly Hair. Clemson's bid for all-America 
honors, was well boxed in by Terp tacklers 
while Maryland looked pretty much like 
the team that bowled the sugar at New 
Orleans last year. The Terps outgaincd 
the Tigers by close to 200 yards. For 
Clemson Hair and Dick Whitten made 
valiant tries but, for this afternoon at 
least, they were in the major leagues on 
all counts. Clemson, rated as better than 
Missouri or Auburn, picked by prognosti- 
cating Notre Dame Coach Frank Leahy 
to take the Terps, was never really in 
the ball game. 

Maryland's first score came early in the 
game after a down field march punctuated 
by brilliant passing and receiving, Scar- 
bath scored. 

In the second another well schooled 
Miles of short and long passes terminated 
when Weidensaul loped into the end zone 
as a target for Scarbath's touchdown pass. 
After a series of varied and brilliant plays, 
set back by penalties, Scarbath made a 
delayed pitchout to Chet Hanulak who 
went over for the third score. 

In the fourth the Terps were penalized 
so often they were moving backward 
faster than most teams go forward. When 
it looked like no more scoring for the 
Tatumites Scarbath whipped one to Col- 
teryahn for 18 yards. Then Scarbath 
dropped back and winged one so far and 
high that the trade mark on the ball was 
almost eligible. It went 45 yards. Weid- 
ensaul took it close to pay dirt, where 
Fullerton dove across for the fourth score. 

Don Decker kicked all extra points. 

Scarbath turned in an almost perfect 
game. Praise of him does not reflect upon 
the rest of the team. They were just 
good — a fine team. "Keep" plays, dashes 
down the middle by Ed Fullerton, Colter- 
yahn and Weidensaul receiving passes, the 
powerful line holding and the backfield 
moving with precision and dispatch, all 
indicated that the heroic finishes that 
marked the Auburn and Missouri game 
bad been relegated to so much sugar for 
the bird. 

Clemson was represented musically by 
a top flight contribution from York, Pa., 
the 150 piece band of William Penn High 
School, aided and abetted by sets of drum 
majorettes five deep. One of the Alumni 
court jesters opined that an outfit that 
big and classy could never have cleared 
York without passport visas from Colonel 
Mahlon N. Haines, "Duke of York" and 
Maryland alumnus, to pass the York 



l^arvei ^rrull l^utlen 



v 




THE PERFECT GIFT' 



AVAILABLE IN 
AN ASSORTMENT 
OF 72 SETS 
FROM $8.50 
TO $134.50 




, FINE CUTLERY | 

by Briddell 

Sold By Leading Stores 
Throughout The Country 



MADE BY BRIDDELL of CRISFIELD, MD. 

President, Chas. D. Briddell, Class of 7 935 




PLANTATION 



ANGUS 

"Ai Scotck Ai. A Bagpipe 




FAMOUS For "Ready-to-Cook" FROZEN SEAFOOD 

wmm m ■ W* Also Try 0ur Fresn Picked Crab Meat, Oysters, Canned 

r% t 7/~ffl F' sn Products, Tomatoes, and Whole Kernel Golden Corn. 




PACKING CO 



57] 



Give her a glamorous 

CORSAGE 

from 




Greenhouse-fresh flowers in a 
beautiful selection of artistic 
designs. 

from $*|.00 

FREE DELIVERY -PHONE 

JU 7-7100 

ELLSWORTH DRIVE near FENTON 
SILVER SPRING 
NA 4276 
1212 F STREET, N.W., WASHINGTON 

OV 0700 
2812 S. RANDOLPH ST., ARLINGTON 



JOHN H. DAVIS 

COMPANY 

* 

Paint Contractor 



Phone Lincoln 3-2337 

1019 G STREET, S.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D.C. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASH I NGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 1 , M D , 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 



youngsters over the Mason-Hamlin line 
for a worthwhile gesture to a visiting team. 

Maryland 37; Georgia 

Georgia's famed forward wall did not 
halt Scarbath-led Maryland, for when the 
line held the great Terp quarterback found 
ways to pass beyond the lines. Georgia's 
highly regarded Bratkowski-Babcock pass- 
ing combo failed to percolate. 

Georgia started well but it proved to be 
only the initial scare recently part of Terp 
routine. All of a sudden the Tatumsters 
sparked and, for the rest of the afternoon, 
blinded 34,000 spectators with a bewilder- 
ing display of speed, dash, accuracy and 
power. Seven terrapins tallied in one of 
the most devasting setbacks ever im- 
posed upon a Georgia team. To add to 
the tallies registered by Terps Scarbath, 
Hanulak, Liebold, Fullerton and Bielski, 
Bob Laughery booted a 35-yard field goal 
and Decker clicked in 4 of 5 conversion 
attempts. 

With Maryland power unveiled in im- 
pressive style Tatum's terps also un- 
wrapped, in Dick Bielski, a lad who hit 
the line a la "Big Mo '51." 

Georgia started well. They went down 
field to look like winners and then, wham, 
it was picnic time for terrapins! Maryland 
scored after marches of 54, 54, 69, 36 and 
88 yards, the "3-M club," Modzelewski, 
Maletzky and Morgan wreaking havoc on 
Georgia's tries at running with that thing. 

Terp scoring began when Scarbath, per- 
forming like the No. 1 quarterback he is, 
passed to Felton and Hanulak for healthy 
gains. Bielski tore through for more 
yardage setting the pay off for Scarbath 
on a scoring pass to Hanulak. The latter 
starred all afternoon. When the Terps 
threatened again and Georgia held 
Laughery angled one from 35 yards away 
to make it 10-0. 

Just before mid-game Chet Hanulak 
again began marching through Georgia. 
Another long pass, Scarbath to Hanulak, 
drew bulldog attention to the overhead 
attack, whereupon Bielski made two great 
plunges amidships and Scarbath kept the 
oval to scamper across for another TD, 
17-0. 

The second half had hardly gotten under- 
way when the Terps, Hanulak and Bielski 
at their best, reeled off 69 yards in half 
a dozen plays, Bielski scoring, 24-0. A few 
minutes later Faloney returned a Georgia 
punt for 24 yards. Then, Fullerton ripping 
through and Hanulak rolling some more, 
Fullerton scored, 31-0. A fumble by Mary- 
land thwarted another score and an off- 
side penalty killed yet another. Then 
Liebold ended a long drive for another 
score to make it 37-0. "Anyhow they made 
ONE mistake," opined a spectator, 
"Georgia blocked that last conversion." 

Coach Jim Tatum's post game comment 
included, "they surprised me. I did not 
know they were that good. They played 
marvelous football, particularly on de- 
fense. However, Georgia's Coach Wally 
Butts, described the Terps as "tougher 
than last year and smarter, much smarter. 
We used six defenses. The Terps picked 
them all to pieces. That Scarbath! He's 
a legitimate All-American." 



Maryland 38; Navy 7 

'There was no high elation 

"On the old China Station, 

"From Crabtown to ships at Timbuctoo, 

"So there was no merry toast 

"To our team, the Service boast 

"As the terpins made the good old Navy 

blue." 

That's taking liberty with one of Navy'a 
old roundelays. 

Navy, game to the core and fully true 
to the code established on the bloodsoaked 
decks of the Chesapeake by Lawrence's 
"Don't give up the ship," was forced to 
settle for the third straight year, for a 
parody on Perry's message from Lake 
Erie, "We have met the enemy and we are 
his'n, 38 to 7." 

Not only was this the greatest sports 
classic in College Park's history but for 
the D. C. area as well. A crowd of close to 
45,000 included the Governor, admirals, gen- 
erals, men-of-warsmen, landsmen, bands- 
men and marines, as well as Schnee- 
wittchen und die sieben Zwerge and may- 
be also the '48 false prophet who noted, 
"The stadium will be known as a white 
elephant. Curley'll never fill it." 

Temporary bleachers in all sections were 
loaded and more fans were standing. The 
sellout induced NCAA to O.K. local TV. 
If all the horseless carriages in the world 
were lined up bumper to bumper it would 
have been adjacent hiways after the game. 

A pepped up Navy team again learned 
that the big leagues these days consist of 
better than Cornell, Yale and William and 
Mary, as Head Coach Jim Tatum, after 
the first half, pulled most of his first 
string. 

Navy was never seriously in Maryland's 
class and the fellow who asked why Navy 
does not want to play the Tatumterps any- 
more in a natural intra-State classic will 
find the answer on three straight score 
boards. 

Jack Scarbath showed the multitude 
just why he is ail-American. 

Maryland players, tackled, passed the 
ball to footloose terps, End Colteryahn 
passed to End Weidensaul for a score. 

Stopped temporarily, Decker contrib- 
uted a field goal and made good on all 
conversions. 

Only with the first string on the bench, 
plus costly penalties, did Navy put over 
one TD. They were badly outclassed, 256 
to 66 yards rushing; 241 to 62 passing; 21 
to 6 first downs. 

The game was in its infancy when it be- 
came apparent that Skipper Eddie Erde- 
latz was stuck with a ship destined to be 
run upon rocks or shoals and otherwise 
hazarded. 

It was a perfectly beautiful day for this 
great spectacle but, nonetheless, Navy 
found it heavy weather on the gulf. 

In the first quarter Jack Scarbath, cool 
as though Tatum had had him in a deep 
freeze all night, pitched a pay off to Ralph 
Felton, followed by another to Chet Han- 
ulak. The Terps scored in each of the first 
three times they had the ball as Decker 
booted a field goal to put them ahead 17-0. 

After a 52 yard march a pitch to Ful- 
lerton scored another touchdown, 24-0. 

Then came the dilly that found Navy 
had failed to heed the bosun's mate's "Up 



58' 



all hammicks!" Scarbath whipped one to 

Colteryahn on whom Navy had zeroed 
all batteries. However, he tossed across 
field to Weidensaul for the numbers 31-0. 

It became 38 to when Bernie Faloney, 
quaiterbaeking, pitched for the score board 
to Leland Liebold. 

Navy's score came in the 4th frame, 
Fisher going over. 

All touchdown plays of the Navy-Mary- 
land game were shown the following week 
on a TV national program of the week's 
"big" games, in connection with which the 
Alderton to Weidensaul pass play was 
featured as "the play of the week." 

Maryland Head Coach Jim Tatuni la- 
beled Alderton's play against Navy as 
"the greatest single performance I have 
ever seen." 

Alderton, however, said, "Morgan, Mod- 
zelewski. Maletsky, Nestor, Crytzer, Hurd, 
and Lattimer should get the credit. They 
racked up the play before it ever got to 
me." (GOOD ones always talk like that.) 

Maryland 34; L.S.U. 6 

Before 30,000 homecoming fans Mary- 
land outclassed L.S.U. 34-6, making the 
18th straight win for the high men on the 
Tatum pole. They scored once in the 
first ; twice in the second and twice in the 
third. After that Big Jim followed prece- 
dent, put in the lower echelons and L.S.U. 
scored. 

Scarbath starred again with 11 of 18 
throws made good for 181 yards and 
three touchdowns. 

The rough going sidelined Ed Fullerton 
for at least a week. Ralph Felton and 
John Alderton were badly bruised. 

L.S.U. got into Maryland's territory 
only twice all afternoon. "I knew they 
were good", said L.S.U. Coach Tinsley 
"And that Scarbath was great, but I did 
not believe either the team or Scarbath 
were THAT good". 

The first period was less than 5 minutes 
old when, after a swift march downfield 
Scarbath tossed to Fullerton who went 
over. 6-0. 

In the second L.S.U. fumbled. Fullerton 
snatched it. A pass, Scarbath to Hanulak, 
sent the latter over. 13-0. 

A 31 yard to Weidensaul from Scarbath 
made it 20-0. Through the L.S.U. line or 
over it the Terps moved forward. Scar- 
bath hit Weidensaul again for another 
score, 27-0. Weidensaul's catch, on the 
dead run, was a sensational bit. 77 yards 
on 4 plays and Scarbath slammed a strike 
to Colteryahn. 27-0. 

Another 74 yards in 11 plays and Scar- 
bath smacked one to make it 34-0. 

All but the first of Decker's kicks were 
good. 

With the rinky dinks getting some ex- 
perience the first stringers on the bench 
saw L.S.U. rack up the Bayou Tigers lone 
score. 

Crystal Gazing, 1952 

Last year Grantland Rice. Dean of 
sports writers, picked Maryland to finish 
"No. 22, behind Navy." That was last 
year. It was o.k. too. Our fellers came out 
pretty good, undefeated, national champs. 
Sugar Bowl win that made Tennessee look 
like Tiddly-Oddly Hi. 

{Continued on page 64) 



CHARTERED BY ^CONGRESS 1867 




We invite your use of our Complete Banking 
and Trust Facilities 

National Savings /Trust 
Company 

BRUCE BAIRD, President 

15th STREET AND NEW YORK AVENUE, N. W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Member Federal Reserve System • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



S. D. MOSES, INC 

Concrete Construction 



817 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtional 8586 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

LOgan 

7-8455 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 

TOP SOIL ROAD GRAVEL 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

LOgan 

7-8448 








WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 







NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission w "C-O-TWO" © Gas Masks, Canisters 

Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 

1244 NINTH STREET N.W. WASHINGTON 1, D. C. HUdson 4430 



59' 





"^v 


c 


Automatic 


A 


Merchandisers 


N 

D 

\ 

M 


. . . Serving the 

University of 

Maryland 


CANDY 
CIGARETTES 


A 


SOFT DRINKS 


T 


Quality Merchandise 




Nationally Known 
Brands 


C 

O 

INC. 


Up-to-date Equipment 

PEabody 7700 
2124 Cambridge St. 

Baltimore 31, Md. 



The 

Maurice 
Leeser Co. 

I PRINTERS 
* I PUBLISHERS 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 

536 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 

SAratoga 4446-4447 

In Our Second Generation 
of Quality and Service 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 0020 



Pictures Framed 

We specialize in framing Diplomas 
inexpensively 

DOELLER & DRAISEY 

121 8 Northview Rd., Baltimore 
By appointment — HOpkins 3792 



TEAGUE JOINS STAFF 

Eddie Teague, who will also teach phys- 
ical education, joined the Maryland foot- 
ball staff. He came to Maryland after 
serving 15 months in the First Marine 
Division in Korea. A captain, Teague also 
served three years during World War II. 

Teague attended North Carolina State 
during 1941-43. then transferred to North 
Carolina U. in the Marine unit there and 
received his A. B. degree. Following his 
stay in the service he returned to Chapel 
Hill for his Master's in 1947. 

Then to Guilford College as backfield 
coach and assistant director of physical 
education in 1947 and 1948. He was head 
coach and athletic director in 1949-51 be- 
fore being recalled by the Marine Corps. 



HE'S "IN" 

An alumnus from the class of '51 tells 
us his fiancee's folks "treat me just like 
one of the family. Only last night her old 
man tried to borrow ten bucks." 



WINTER 
SPORTS 



Boxing 

ARYLAND'S boxers have 
been selected to meet 
Syracuse in the New 
Orleans Sugar Bowl this 
year. 

It will be the second 
such assignment for the 
Terp ringsters, coached 
by Frank Cronin. In '48 Maryland won 
from Michigan State in the Sugar Bowl, 
the Terp team being composed of Mont 
Whipp, Ken Malone, Bob Gregson, Eddie 
Rieder, Roland Hyde, Danny Smith, 
Andy Quattrocchi and Al Salkowski. The 
schedule:— 
Dec. 27 Syracuse — Sugar Bowl 
Syracuse 
Penn. State 
The Citadel 
Army 

Michigan State 
South Carolina 




Jan. 



: Feb. 



Mo, 



17 
31 
13 

21 

27 

6 



* Home Meets at College Park 

Among seven returning lettermen are 
Jackie Letzer, captain of last year's squad. 
Texas Ronnie Rhodes, Southern middle- 
weight champion Bill Mclnnis, Bill 
O'Brien. Bob Theofield, Gary Fisher, and 
Cal Quenstedt. 

Other members of last }-ear's squad in- 
clude Tom Brodie and Gary Garber. Gar- 
ber is the former All-Army bantamweight 
champion. 

Russell Eddy, 135, has had four years 
of Junior Golden Gloves experience. Guido 
Capri, at 125. has lost only six times in 
over 100 bouts while in Carolina Golden 
Gloves. 

Bob Cavanaugh, in the heavyweight di- 
vision, was Constabulary champ in Europe, 
and 145-pounder Bob Klatt comes to Terp- 
town as a protege of former world's mid- 
dleweight champion, Tony Zale. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

"Dec. 2 Virginia 

4 William and Mary 

6 Pennsylvania 

1 3 West Virginia 

17 V.M.I. 

1 8 Washington & Lee 

Jan. 3 North Carolina 

5 Virginia 

7 Richmond 

1 Georgetown 

* 12 V.P.I. 

1 7 North Carolina 

Feb. 3 George Washington 

6 V.P.I. 

9 Richmond 

12 V.M.I. 

14 Washington & Lee 

17 William and Mary 

1 9 Georgetown 

21 Navy 

24 George Washington 



* Home Games at College Park 

To form the nucleus for the '52- '53 Terp 
hoopsters the coach, Bud Millikan, has 
Don "Humper" Moran, Ralph Greco, 
Ronnie Brooks, Morris Levin, and Gene 
Shue. Bill Martin, Dave Webster. Bob 
Dilworth, Jay Butler, and Bob Everett 
move up from last year's freshmen. 

The Terps will be out to improve upon 
the '51-'52 record of 13 wins and eight 
losses. They will also try to make the 
Southern Conference tournament for the 
third straight year where, last year, they 
lost to Duke 51-48 in the last four minutes. 

Freshmen are eligible for varsity play 
and Millikan has four excellent prospects 
in John Sandbower, Marvin Long. Bob 
Kessler and Bob Hall. 







SOCCER SCHEDULE 


Oct. 


1 1 


Penn. State 


& 


16 


Washington & Lee 




24 


North Carolina State 




31 


Duke 


*Nov 


5 


Johns Hopkins 




7 


Loyola 




15 


North Carolina 




21 


Western Maryland 



1 Home Games at College Park 

The soccermen look forward to another 
successful season. Approximately 50 can- 
didates are out for the 25 berths on the 
defending Southern conference champion- 
ship squad. 

The Terps. six players suddenly de- 
clared ineligible by Southern Conference, 
lost to Penn State 11-0. 

Difficult gaps to plug are those left by 
the graduation of All-Americans Eric Baer, 
Jim Savage and Tom Hamilton. Expected 
to step in very capably are team Captain 
Ken Hildreth. Dave Williams, and Hector 
Salinas, sidelined due to injuries last 
season. 

Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia. Lebanon, 
Peru, Manila, Panama, Nicaragua. Penn- 
sylvania. New York, Virginia, Washington, 
D. C, and Maryland . . . sounds like a 
Cook's tour of the world, doesn't it? But 
it is only "home town" list of the soccer 
squad. Soccer is the sport that receives 
most emphasis in the Latin American 
countries. 

The state of Maryland specializes in 
lacrosse and soccer. 



60 



WRESTLING SCHEDULE 



Dec. 


13 


West Virginia 


"Jan. 


9 


North Carolina State 




31 


Navy 


Feb. 


7 


Washington & Lee 




14 


V.M.I. 




21 


North Carolina 




28 


Penn. State 



* Home Meets at College Park 

The outlook for Terrapin grapplers is 
bright as returning lettermen include 
Southern conference champions Matt 
Flynn, Rodney Xorris, Bob and Ernie 
Fischer, and Jack Shanahan. Carl Everley 
will also be back to throw his heft around 
in the heavyweight class. 

From last year's freshmen team are 
Frank Scarfile, John Little, and Bob 
Dreier. 

The Terps will be out to try to improve 
upon their fine record of last year when 
they won six dual meets and lost two. 

Frank Alfaro. Cliff Mathews, and Xorris 
also won titles in the D.C.A.A.U. in 
Washington. 

The Fischer brothers and Shanahan 
represented Maryland at the National 
A.A.U. tourney at Ithaca. X. Y. and Rod- 
ney Xorris topped the season by winning 
in the Olympic regional tryouts at Prince- 
ton. X. J. 

CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE 



Oct. 


10 


Navy 


* 


17 


Pennsylvania 




25 


North Carolina 




31 


Duke 


Nov 


12 


Richmond 



* Home Games at College Park 

The cross country team lost such out- 
standing Southern Conference runners as 
Tyson Creamer. Al Buehler and Bob 
Browning:, who figured prominently in 
Maryland's past cross country success. But 
back to cam' on for the Terps will be John 
Tibbets. Ray Horsley, Don Goldstein and 
Kenny Thornton plus a host of other 
runners for Coach Jim Kehoe's harrier 
squad . 

During the last five years, the Terps have 
taken four-out-of-five Southern Conference 
championship meets. They finished second 
to Xorth Carolina State the only time 
they failed to win the title. The string of 
undefeated dual meets was at 28. as the 
'52 season opened. 

Maryland's Tibbetts took first place in 
the meet with Xavy, but a ninth place 
finish by Navy's Harper won for Xavy 
27-28. 

Harper battled Maryland's Horsley 
stride for stride over most of the 3.9 miles 
course, then pulled away in the last quarter 
mile to take ninth place and score the 
deciding point. 

This snapped the Terps' six year win- 
ning streak of 29 dual meets and 4 Con- 
ference championships. 



Osfer's Rifle Wins 

Roy Oster won the aggregate telescopic 
sight match in the Fifth Annual Harvest 
Rifle championships at Greenbelt Gun 
Club, 795 out of a possible 800. 



OLDSMOBILE 




ROCKET 



ANDERSON OLDSMOBILE, Inc. 

114 West North Avenue Phone MUlberry 0232 

BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



New Cars 
Used Cars 



Parts and 
Service 



Now Open! 



1 alley Hurl 



Garden — Gift — Gourmet Shop 

A world of gifts . . . from all over the world brought to you ... at the Valley Mart. One of most 
distinctive . . . and the most diversified house and garden Gift Collections ever assembled under 
one roof! 

It's one of the newest and most unique Gift Shops in the world! Cramfull of such exciting indoor 
and outdoor gift ideas, you'll be tempted to duplicate every gift selection for your own house 
and garden! 

Open every day, including Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



cya% 



Garden — Gift — Gourmet Shop 

Falls Road, one mile north of Mt. Washington (Baltimore) 




CARROLL R. SENNER 

REPAIRING and REFINISHING 
Antiques & Fine Furniture 

3207 BATAVIA AVENUE HA. 1116 BALTIMORE 14 



ETHEL M. TROY 

Life - INSURANCE - General 
17 Light Street LExington 7578 Baltimore 2, Md. 



61 



Distinctive Dining . . . 

Water Gate Inn 

On the Potomac at F 

Open every day 11:30 to 10 p.m. 
District 9256 Washington, D. C. 



EEEEHi 



EASY TERMS— TRADE INS 

Photo-Movie Snpollea 

• Free Parking 

• Free Catalog 

Open 9 to 6 — Than. 9 to 9 



Brenner 933 penn.Av fc .£ 

OOpoS. JUSTICE DEPT. RE. 2434 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 




R. W. Claxton, Inc. 

SEA FOODS 



Wholesale 



Retail 



404-6 TWELFTH ST., S.W. 
NA. 0574 Washington, D.C. 



R. MARS The Contract Co. 


WHOLESALE 


Furniture • Rugs • Linens 


For information on how YOU can shop here. 


Call TR: 6900, or write L. R. Mitchell. 


410 FIRST STREET, S.E. 


SH: 7357 WASHINGTON 3, D.C. 



J\upertu3 
SHEET METAL 

Mechanical Contractors 

7337 Walker Mill Road 
Washington 1 9, D. C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof - Colorfast 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



hour service for line cuts 
. . . zinc & copper halftones 



Advertisers Engraving Service, Inc. 
Washington Post Building • NAtional 5434 



ARTISTS' PAINTERS' 

DRAFTSMEN'S & ENGINEERS' 



SUPPLIES 



710 
13th 



MUTH 



3313 
11th 



7334 Balto. Ave. College Park, Md. 




Man is the noblest work of God. However, nobody ever said so but man. 




Benny. He tells of 
"Bixby's Error." 



THERE'S a public 'ouse in England 
called "Bixby's Error." We must tell 
you about that as related to this column 
by Benny Alperstein. '39. who used to 
please Maryland alumni, faculty and stu- 
dents by bringing national and southern 
boxing titles to Mary- 
land, but who now pleases 
the same folks, and a 
great many more, with 
the lops in electrical ap- 
pliances, TV sets, ironers, 
furniture and what will 
you have. A few even- 
ings ago, between remi- 
niscent upper-cuts and 
jabs, vacuum cleaners 
and washing machines, 
Benjy told us about 
"Bixby's Error" as fol- 
lows, colon and dash, 
namely, to wit and (regarding poultry 
only, e.g.) although most people still like 
that "viz." 

A jolly h'old h'American bounder was 
on a sort of bender with a British friend. 
In the course of their merry rounds they 
oontzed into "Bixby's Error" and glitched 
up to the bar. 

"Why." asked the Yankee, "do they call 
this chamber of horrors "Bixby's Error"? 

"Look down at the other end of the 
bar," replied the Briton. 

Thereupon the American let out a shriek 
akin to a Comanche warwhoop and 
screamed, "I must have the heebie jeebies. 
That little soldier statue down there not 
only just moved but it also saluted and 
sneezed." 

"That little statue," explained the Bri- 
ton, "is no statue at all. That's Bixby. 
After him this public 'ouse is named. That 
is Colonel Walpole-Fitzmaurice-Bixby, 
(the hyphens are for the little guy to sit 
down on), of Walpole 
Castle, Nottingham- 
shire. He's very much 
alive. I'll call him. I 
say theah Bixby, h'old 
fellow, would you 
moind?" 

With that, Colonel 
Walpole-Fitzmaurice- 
Bixby, all ten inches 
of him, in full regi- 
mentals, marched mil- 
itarily down the top 
of the bar, saluted and 
explained, "Originally 
I was quite some tall- 
er. Over six as a mat- 
ter of fact and weigh- 
ing fourteen and a 
hawf stone. Bloomin' 
lot of service for the 
Queen too. Victoria, 
that is. Command 
rank in the somewhat 
glorious Iniskillin Dra- 
goons and all that sort 
of thing . Stout fel- 
lows, y'knaow, "chins 



up," "be British, men," "carry on," "pip 
pip" and all that sort of bally rot for those 
who loike it. Service in South h'Africa. 
Boer trouble you know. Spion Kop, the 
Marda River, relief column to Lidysmith 
with a veritable galaxy of royal regiments, 
including the Black Watch, the Forty 
Twa's, the Queen's own bloomin' Loife 
Guard, the Dublin Fusiliers, the Royal 
Garrison Artillery, the Gordon 'ighlanders, 
the Cameron 'ighlanders, the Irish Rifles, 
the Coldstreams, the Middlesex, several 
regiments of blasted colonials and lawst, 
but by no means least, (since they brought 
their own shipboard artillery), Sir Percy 
Scott and a bloomin' lot of tars." 

"Well," continued Bixby, comfortably 
seating himself on the edge of an ash tray, 
"after the tumult and the shouting died 
and the captains and the kings departed, 
as good old Rudyard would say, we fell 
in with a tribe of nytive Kaffirs, observing 
tribal customs and meeting the top brass. 
That blasted old Kaffir witch doctor! Jolly 
good reason never to forget that old 
bloighter, responsible as 'e is for giving 
this place its name, "Bixby's Error." Strike 
me bloomin well pink and up a blasted 
plum tree if I didn't wike h'up next morn- 
ing measuring exactly ten inches tall I Yes 
sir, the mistake of my loife, sir. It was Bix- 
by's error, alright, alright. And that it was! 
I should never, NEVER have called that 
blasted Kaffir witch doctor a "faking old 
schnook." 



And for that note in the poultry depart- 
ment we call attention to a sign in front oj 
a farm house up near Frederick, e.g., 
EGG'S 

(An expert in such matters explains that 
the apostrophe denotes that the farmer 
still possesses the eggs.) 




Sandy MacTavish 
turned out for a free 
banquet and took 
from the pocket of 
his dress suit a news 
extra headed, "DEW- 
EY'S FLEET BOM- 
BARDS MANILA." 



JUST LIKE 



HERODOTUS SAID 



U of M '50: "Good old Uncle Thammy 
and his mails! Neither snow nor rain nor 
heat nor gloom of night kept him from de- 
livering this urgent Alumni Association 
notice to attend the Homecoming Dance 
tonight." 



Galo Plaza, a prod- 
uct of the Maryland 
campus, who became 
President of Ecuador, 
in a speech at a sports 
gathering during his 
last visit to the United 
States said, "If poli- 
tics operated under an 
athletic code of sports- 
manship there woidd 
be fewer punches be- 
low the belt." We 
thought of that sage 
observation after 
reading the blasts lev- 
eled at presidential 
candidates by oppos- 
ing speakers. If all the 



[62; 



calumny heaped upon a political candidate 
were true it would require an act of Divine 
Providence to elevate him to the level of 
total depravity. So low down you'd have 
to reach up to touch bottom. 



There are very few around and about 
these days patterned after Will Rogers 
and his "I never met a man I didn't like." 
They're as rare as postage stamps of 
Whistler's father. 



Mary had some, roller skates 
On which she loved to frisk. 

She sure had courage plenty 
Her little *. 



Old Man Mose. who has worked all of his 
life for a boss down in Somerset County, 
finally admits that the airplane is here to 
stay. Mose used to insist that if the Good 
Lord had intended men to fly he would 
have had them born with wings. Of course 
Mose never had an answer to "Yes, and 
if He had wanted them to wear clothes 
you would have been born with pants on." 



Now Mose believes man can fly better 
than birds. But he can't sit down on a 
barbed wire fence. 



This is the same Mose to whom the 
Boss said. "Mose, I'm going up to New 
York for a few days. The battery on my 
car is weak. Please turn it over once a 
day." Mose agreed to do just that but 
when the boss returned, Mose remarked, 
"Had to get a few fellers to he'p me turn 
'er over. Don't see what you wanted that 
done fer. Got the sides and top of the car 
all muddy." 



A math professor advises that he will 
lend his assistance in an all out effort to 
figure how come the lad who tells us he is 
"one third Hawaiian." 



Professor: "Quattlebaum, you're fifteen 
minutes late for class." 

Quattlebaum: "Aw, I'm not one of those 
clock watchers." 



Homer Q. Oxenheart's kid brother now 
in Korea writes that a young lady sent 
him a very delicious cake for his birthday 
but that he was unable to write and thank 
her for it because he had eaten the return 
address on the package. 



King Solomon and King David 

Led very snappy lives, 
They had a flock of concubines 

And twice as many wives. 
When they'd grown old and feeble 

And youth had lost its charms, 
King Solly wrote the Proverbs 

And King Davy wrote the Psalms. 



Solomon was the wisest man and should 
have been. All those women bringing in 
all that news. Hoxo could he miss? 



Englishman fished a fly out of his drink 
with a spoon. Irishman blew his out. 
Scotchman wrung his out. 



History tells us that stockings were in- 
vented in the eleventh century. They 
weren't discovered until the twentieth. 




**~* Tin i<^ m^w *•*. 

PETROLEUM STORAGE TERMINAL 

PINEY POINT, MARYLAND 

The only deep water terminal receiving ocean-going tankers devoted 
to serving the Washington area exclusively. 



NDUSTRIAL FUEL OILS 



GASOLINE 



L. P. STEUART & BRO., INC 



LINCOLN 3-4300 



WASHINGTON 2 , D.C 




SmooMy Delicious 
and Oh-So 
Refreshing! 

Enjoy it Often! It's Good For You! 

Meadow Gold 

Ice Cream 

Meadow Gold Products, Inc. 

ASK FOR OUR FLAVOR OF THE MONTH 



SALES 


fYorkj 


SERVICE 




AIR CONDITIONERS - REFRIGERATION • 


• AUTOMATIC ICE MAKERS 


WASHINGTON 


REFRIGERATION 


CO. 


2052 WEST VIRGINIA AVENUE, N.E. 




FRanklin 8300 




Washingto 


n, D. C. 



631 



WHY 

is the University of Maryland's 
Agricultural Program so important? 

Because in the work of 
its extension service 
throughout the State, it 
is bringing the benefits 
of modern research and 
methods to farms and 
homes alike. 

The Thomsen-Ellis- 
Hutton Company is 
proud to be associated 
with the University 
through the printing of 
the Maryland 
Magazine. 

Thomsen- Ellis -Hutton Company 

PRIDEMARK PRESS 

418 Water Street at Gay 
Baltimore 2 • Maryland 

LETTERPRESS AND OFFSET PRINTING 



USE THIS 
COUPON 




RAISE CHINCHILLAS 

The hobby with a future 




INTERESTING & PROFITABLE 

Many have developed a profitable and 
interesting business by starting with 
chinchillas as a hobby. 

little competition 

Chinchillas are extinct in the wild. 
Unlike other fur industries, there is 
no competition from wild pelts. 

A NEW INDUSTRY 

Chinchilla farming is in its infancy. 
Little space is needed for a business 
of unpredictable magnitude. 

Visit our chinchilla farm or write 
for full information 

SPARKS' 
CHINCHILLA FARM 

5885 Rollins Ave., Seat Pleasant, Md. 
Phone Hillside 6339 



FOOTBALL 

[Continued from page 5Q) 

Thi< year it.* sumpin else again, seems 
like. Every haruspex in the country has the 
Terrapins twirling the baton at the head 
of the big parade coming up Pigskin 
Avenue. That's nice, but it places our 
warriors behind the 9 ball, the shadow of 
the 8 being crowded. Printing young Jack 
Scarbath's picture, king size, on the cover 
of Collier's is a load to carry — in addition 
to the ball. 

Coach Jim Tatum and his aides have 
been placed squarely on the spot by the 
prognosticating football experts. Here is 
how the "big-time" selectors rated the 
Terps before the season opened, viz : — 

Francis Wallace in Collier's: Tops with 
9-0 mark. Quarterback Jack Scarbath back 
of the year; Tackle Dick Modzelewski, 
also All-America, and Jim Tatum coach of 
the year. Scarbath's picture on front cover. 

Fred Russell in Saturday Evening Post : 
No. 1. with Modzelewski picked as certain 



as good this year. Puts Scarbath at 
quarterback on his All-America offensive 
team and End John Alderton and Mod- 
zelewski on his All-America defensive out- 
fit. Scarbath pictured on cover. 

Associated Press: Maryland second to 
Michigan State in poll of 214 sportswriters 
and sportscasters with 1,696 points against 
1.720 for the Spartans. Maryland, how- 
ever, polled 79 first place ballots against 
76 for Michigan State. Scoring was 10 for 
first, 9 for second, 8 for third, etc. 

International News Service: Offered no 
point-scoring ballot but voted Maryland 
first over Michigan State. Has this to say 
about Terps: "Heavy losses, tough 
schedule, but wealth of material headed by 
All-America candidates Scarbath and 
Modzelewski." 

Many others put Maryland in the front 
rank either as No. 1 or a championship 
contender. As we go to press, following 
the Clemson game, and before the Navy 
meet, Maryland is AP-rated No. 2, behind 
Michigan State. 



Cllt IT OUT NOW!' 




SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to 

the Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to 
"MARYLAND" for one year. 



All-America and lineman of the year. 

Grantland Rice, dean of sportswriters, in 
Look: Sees Maryland, Michigan State, 
Oklahoma, Illinois and Washington State 
vying for top spot. Selects no All- America 
team but lauds Scarbath and Modzelewski. 

Stanley Woodward, ranking grid expert, 
in his Foodball magazine: Opines that 
Maryland was best in 1951 and should be 



* NATIONAL * 
AUTO TOP CO. .nc 

COMPLETE ACCIDENT SERVICE 
Body Repairs 

Auto 
Painting 

Seat 
Covers 

Upholstering 

2114 — 14thSt.,N.W. DEcatur2347 
WASHINGTON 9, D. C. 




For Boston 

The biggest football weekend in Mary- 
land's history is expected for the Boston 
University game in Boston the weekend 
of November 1. More tickets have been 
sold at College Park than ever before for 
such an event. 

Students will be excused from classes 
at 3 p. m. Friday on presentation of a 
signed ticket to the game. Maryland 
alumni residing in New England are mak- 
ing the day a "second homecoming." 

Still to go are the Boston game, Mi>sis- 
sippi on November 15, and Alabama on 
November 22. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Service Between 
Baltimore - Washington - Annapolis 

Lexington 1756 
1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



64 



SPEAKING OF ATHLETICS . . . 

Today it is Roller Skating! 

'{America oh Wheels 

OFFERS YOU THREE NEARBY RINKS OF STREAMLINED BEAUTY 



)> 



For Your 

HEALTH'S 

SAKE 



•V« 




s 



A BRONZE MEDAL 
DANCE TEAM 

Miss Clay Keene Bernard, 
Holton-Arms School, Terra- 
pin Boxing Mascot, '37-'40, 
with Rusty Miller in Exhibi- 
tion at Ritchie Coliseum. 

"Washington Star" Folo 
by Elwood Baker 



ROLLER SKATING 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AT ITS ENJOYABLE BEST 



• WASHINGTON 

National Arena 

7 6th and Kalorama Rd. 

• BLADENSBURG 

Defense Hi-Way 
2 Blocks East of 
Peace Cross 

• ALEXANDRIA 

Madison and North 
St. Asaph Streets 

SESSIONS NIGHTLY 
7:30 to 1 1 :00 P.M. 

Matinees Saturdays, 
Sundays and Holidays 



\ 



2:00 to 5:00 P.M. 



The ideal coed sport, enhancing the enjoyment of the ballroom with the benefits of healthy exercise 



OTHER AMERICA ON WHEELS ARENAS AT:— 



Capitol Arena 

TRENTON, N. J. 

Mt. Vernon Arena 

MT. VERNON, N. Y. 



Twin City Arena 

ELIZABETH, N. J. 



Boulevard Arena 

BAYONNE, N. J. 



St. Nicholas Arena 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Hackensack Arena 

HACKENSACK, N. J. 



Paterson Arena 

PATERSON, N. J. 



Peekskill Arena 

PEEKSKILL, N. Y. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

1018 Sherman Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 
W. SCHMITZ, General Manager 



for fun, for sport, for health join "America on Wheels" 




Phoiogroph by Horold M Lambert 



Maryland's part of Greater Washington is booming! The suburbs in Montgomery 
and Prince Georges Counties continue to blossom in every direction with new 

developments . . new homes, new industries, new shops, and other businesses. 
And many, many new faces. Are you one of the new arrivals? If so, we 
know you'll soon become an enthusiastic booster of our thriving, progressive 
Maryland communities. To you, especially, may we suggest the importance of 

selecting the right bank for your banking and trust needs. 
We have every facility for serving you, and 12 different 
offices for your convenience. 
You are assured of a warm welcome at Suburban Trust, 

whether your banking needs are small or large. Let us 
introduce you to service in the neighborly "Suburban manner!" 



1 




Suburban Trust Company 

A Strong, Friendly Bank 



SILVER SPRING, MD. 

8252 Georgia Ave SLigo 1000 
College Park, Md. — 7360 Baltimore Ave 
Greenbelt, Md. — 25 Crescent Rd 
White Oak, Md. — Naval Ordnance Laboratory 
West Hyattsville, Md. — 5416 Queens Chapel Rd 
6842 New Hampshire Ave. — Takoma Park, Md 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

5214 Baltimore Ave. UNion 7500 

Bethesda, Md. — 4600 East- West Highway 
8722 Flower Ave. — (And Piney Branch Rd.) 
Mt. Rainier, Md. — 3716 Rhode Island Ave. 
Takoma Park, Md. — Carroll & Willow Aves. 
Wheaton, Md. — 11427 Georgia Ave. 



Suburban Washington's Largest Bank — Resources Over 65-Million Dollars 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



• Regular Checking Accounts 

• Special Checking Accounts 

• Savings Accounts 

• Christmas Savings Accounts 

• Travelers Checks 

• Safe Deposit Boxes 

• Night Depository 

• Trust Services 

• Personal Loans 

• Business Loans 

• Collateral Loans 

• Automobile Loans 

• Insurance Loans 

• Home Improvement 
& Modernization Loans 



VOL. XXIV— No. 2 

JAN.FEB..1953 

— O — 

50c 
THE COPY 

THE YEAR 



"iManjlanif urialjeB its r?atorB joyous IjoltfcaijB 
unb tlje beat nf all goni tljtnrjs fnr 1053 



POTo 




For Modern Plumbing & Heating 

We offer the finest quality in wholesale 

PLUMBING & HEATING SUPPLIES 
PIPE • VALVES • FITTINGS 

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIFICATIONS 
AVAILABLE FOR ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS 




Visit Our Complete, Modern 

PLUMBING and HEATING SHOWROOM 

1206 K Street, N.W., • Washington, D. C. 



WAREHOUSES 

4th & Channing Sts., N.E 
1 206-8 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



NEW BRANCH 



BRANCH 

1680 Clough Street 

Baltimore 

Maryland 

R. D. Watson, President — Class 1917 



8216 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring 
Maryland 



JAMES A. MESSEH COMPANY 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You Get So Much 
For So Little 

V PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 
\/ NIACIN for NERVES 

\/ CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

JANUARY 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

S. H. HARVEY, President 



S 



ELLERS 

ALES & SERVICE 

Before you buy — see the new DeSoto 

oLJeS^oto 
J lumoutn 

6228 BALTIMORE AVE. 

RIVERDALE, MD. 

P. A. Sellers WArfield 7-6000 





MARYLAND TELEPHONE 

Answering Secretarial Service 

218 Professional Building 

APPLETOX 7-1500 

Hyattsville, Maryland 



FASANKO MOTORS 

YOUR CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DEALER 




UNION 4-8700 



COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



<£ 




Ku^M 



How wonderful it ivould be if 

we could keep the Christmas Spirit 

alive the year long. 

R. WEBSTER ROSS 

JOHN M. WALTON 

DENNIS W. MADDEN 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

Bladensburg Maryland 



PHONE TOWER 9-5100 



B. SUGRUE '34 



NORMAN M OTOR COMPANY 

SALES ^ ^ SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Vol. XXIV January-February 1953 No. 2 







**%%£&%!&*«' 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, 
and entered at the Post Office. College Park, Md., as 
second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of 
March 3, 1879. S3. 00 per year Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10. Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 



General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Lee W. Adkins '42, Abram Z. 

Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Marjorie R. Wharton '41, C. G. Donovan '17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Norman Sinclair '43, Harry A. Boswell, Jr. '42, 

Roger L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL— Harry Levin '26, C. Clifton Coward 

'23, Arthur I. Bell '19. 
EDUCATION— E. Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart 

MeCaw '35, Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING— S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mary R. Lankford '2G, 

Mary S. Humelsine '39, Hilda Jones Nvstrom 

'32. 
LAW— C. Ferdinand Sybert '25, G. Kenneth 

Reiblich '29, John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL— Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurston 

R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY— Frank Block '24, Frank Black '04, 

Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING— Flora Street '38, Eva Darley '27, 

June E. Geiser '47. 



Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Charles W. Sylvester '08. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly '21. 
"M" CLUB— Albert B. Heagy. 
NEW ENGLAND— Dr. Walter S. Longo '22. 
NEW YORK— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Gordon Kessler '29. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Egbert Tingley '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher '45. 



Ex-Officio 

Past President — T. T. Speer '17 
University President — Dr. H. C. Byrd '08 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham '38 



Sally Ladin Ogden 

Advertising Director of 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 

Announces the opening of 
new offices at 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOpkins 7294 



HARVEY L. MILLER 

Editor 




kUR '52 Christmas text, above, com- 
prised the answer to a request from 
the wife of Zebidee, the mother of James 
and John. She had come to Jesus seeking 
counsel. He asked, "What do you want?" 
She replied, "Please command that my 
two sons may sit at your right and left 
hands in your Kingdom." 

Let us use His answer as a holiday edi- 
torial in these days as a troubled world 
celebrates the 1952nd anniversary of the 
birth of Him who's advice and counsel 
has been disregarded down through the 
ages. Millions of fine, clear thinking men 
of all faiths have repeated and preached 
His counsel and advice. Too few men and 
too few nations have followed it. 

Millions of stained glass windows and 
towering steeples testify to the glory of 
His holy name as well as the ageless value 
of His teachings. 

"Walk humble," says a politician as he 
seeks high political office. 

"Walk humble" is the lesson as children 
of God gird their loins for war against 
each other. 

The advice of the Humble Carpenter of 
Nazareth, the Gentle Jew destined to be 
nailed to the cross, is as good today as it 
was when He gave it to the mother of the 
sons of Zebidee. 

Let's think about it over the holidays. 

The mother asks that her two boys sit 
at the left and right of the Master. 

Ambition, within the bounds of reason, 
is commendable. Jesus must have greatly 
respected this mother's wish. God pity 
the son over who's cradle no mother has 
prayed and dreamed and visualized great 
tilings. 

But Jesus' answer to the mother of 
James and John was something new for 
that day and age. It was revolutionary 
and paradoxical. Read it carefully. 

Who ever heard of a servant being 
greater than his master? Of a workman 
being greater than the boss? Of the No. 1 
man being the slave? 

Jesus pointed out that rulers of great 
nations lorded it over the weaker ones, 
and that great men exercised distasteful 
authority over lesser men. 

"Not so shall it be among you," said 



the Great Nazarene, "but whoever would 
be great among you must be your serv- 
ant." 

What a shock that one must have pro- 
vided among Jerusalem's 400, and among 
the overlords of Rome. 

No wonder the ruling classes hated, de- 
spised and feared Jesus! 

Imagine a slave of Caesar's household 
being greater than Caesar! But that was 
true, for there were saints in Caesar's 
household. 

Were the humble fisherfolk, the carpen- 
ters, the despised tax collectors, who fol- 
lowed Jesus greater than the rulers of that 
day? O yes they were. They lived and 
taught ideals and they gave their lives 
bravely, put to death for their ideals in 
the interests of others. 

It was upon this theretofore unheard of 
principle and philosophy that Jesus pro- 
posed to build His Kingdom on this earth. 
He still proposes it in these years of 
'52- '53. 

We are all born to this earth without 
our will or consent. The inexorable laws 
of nature placed us here, but in Christian 
civilization we are here for noble purposes, 
if we are to believe in the teachings of the 
Babe in the Manger who became the 
Greatest Leader of men of all time. How 
clearly He put that into words! 

We are here for the good of others, He 
says, the salt, the light, the fruit bearers, 
the servants, the givers. In the employ- 
ment of every one of these simple nouns 
Jesus shows that man is on this earth to 
be useful for something or to somebody. 

Salt prevents commodities from becom- 
ing corrupt. Light keeps people from 
stumbling in the dark. Were these words 
only for the disciples? Consider who the 
disciples were. Ordinary folk who listened 
and believed. Every man could and can 
still become a disciple. He cried it out 
with love in His heart, "He that hath 
ears let him hear!" 

It was the same message to the usurer, 
Zachary, to the Magdalen of the market 
place, to the hypocritical Pontius Pilate. 
"He that hath ears to hear let him hear." 

So today He speaks to the corrupt in 
public life, the sharpster in business, the 
most vicious and violent gangster, the 
lowest roue, the smuggest hypocrite in 
church. 

No one comes into this life for his own 
purposes. No one is here to feather his 
own nest. We are servants, stewards, 
ransomed slaves. So said Jesus. God has 
a purpose in every one of our lives. 

Do you seek greatness? Greatness and 
service are inseparable. Those who give 
most freely of themselves are the bene- 
factors of mankind. The measure of man's 
greatness, the extent to which he fulfills 
the purpose for which he is here, is the 
measure in which he responds to the con- 
stant claims made upon him by his fellow 
men in the very structure of the civiliza- 
tion which surrounds him and of which 
he is a part. 

What sort of men and women are great? 

Our young warriors in Korea who won, 

posthumously, the Congressional Medal 

of Honor, after throwing themselves on 

hand grenades so that their comrades 

(Turn to "Editorials" page 12) 



[2] 




^ Greetings lo my Fellow Citizens 
and All Alumni of 
The University of Maryland : 

We are about to enter another New Year with that hope and confidence which mm 
bespeak the true spirit of America. 

America's sons still matt the guns which blast ami roar across a distant land. 
The sword of the tyrant still rattles at many a border. The struggle goes on for the 
maintenance of freedom by those who have it. and. we trust, for the regaining of === 
?=. freedom by those who have lost it. No one can say for sure what awaits us in the—. 

— New Year or in the years beyond it. 

~ And yet. our hope is hush; our confidence is strong. Once again, as a nation, ^s 

■_ we have spoken with the strength of a free people. We have held the great debate; 
^ we have been critical without fear of reprisal; we even have been bitter without tear 

--J- of a ruler's wrath for we, the people, are tin- rulers, and there is no oppres 

force to silence us. ^e have held our free election and given our mandates. 

The right and the power to do all this is the source of our confidence, and the 

— beacon of hope for lovers of freedom everywhere. 

We are strong and free because we are informed. We are informed because. 
in war or in peace, our people advance in their education and ill their knowledge. 
= There can be no retrogression lo serfdom while the intellectual attainments of 
each generation surpass those of its predecessor. 

This happy condition is fostered b\ our fine schools from the primary grades 

through great Universities — like our own University of Maryland. 

One of the outstanding assets of this University of ours is the continued in- 
terest of the Alumni in its success and its advancement. 

^ e can and we do find a source of assurance at this holiday season in the faith 
and the strength of the men and women who make up the Alumni and the Alumnae 
of Maryland. 

God willing, the New Year at hand will reveal new cause — new justification — 
for that faith — and for the hope which it maintains and the confidence which it 
inspires. 

With highest regards and best wishes for all. I am 

Sincerelv. 



Un, vers<ty 



J " e Cod ^ 
e * ,e '« that I S or ''"i"tied ,1 , 




THEODORE R. 

Gorernor 



McKELDIN 



con- 
[dto* 







*Mtw7 C a <**owled„ e „ ' CS ; ""' «o* 

aW * '« ae ° n ' •""' Pra, ,i "' M ""<e fr 

' "--2S. ^tr^zty 

:p:, ";" *==-4& 

S?=^S?---^sr.- 

th Totb eSlnd enlSof , '•""'■"* sr a ,,. f ,„ ""'- To lh 

(J ' , 7 npp -fci. w /, l ""■ r " ; —»> ,, 

th T: *■ """•-■: :;;:— -, 

r p,s '■«»»■ Zl- ? c ™*»*l: vk r ""• * • of r , 

^/ '" •""' We. •""' "•<• deepeg, ^'V* ' 



lo 
"d i/„. .=== J 



• are 



I to -^ 





GENERAL ALUMNI COUNCIL FOR 1952-53 

Members of the Alumni Council for 1952-53 in attendance at the annual meeting on November 14 were from right to left: Morris L. Cooper '26, Ben- 
jamin F. Allen '37. Rogar L. Odette '52, Mrs. Marjorie R. Wharton "41, Frederick S. DeMarr '49, G. Kenneth Reiblich '29, John G. Prendergast '33. 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, and Dr. Thurston R. Adams '34. Second Row: Dr. Frank Black '04, Frank Block '24, Dr. Arthur I. Bell '19. Mrs. Florence L. 
Duke '50, Miss E. Louise Sudlow '50, Dr. Howard L. Stier '32, Dr. F. Ford Loker, Dr. C. Clifton Coward '23, and Dr. Harry Levin '26. Back Row: 
Abram Z. Gottwals '38. Dr. Walter S. Longo '22. Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26, Mrs. Katharine A. Longridge '29, Miss Flora Street '38, Mrs. Eva Darley 
'27. Dr. Charles W. Sylvester '08, Col. O. H. Saunders '10, S. Chester Ward '32, and Egbert Tingley '27. At the head table: Dave Brigham '38. Dr. 
Albert E. Goldstein 12. Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. Officers for the new year are Dr. Goldstein. President; Vice-Presidents are J. Homer Remsberg and 
O. H. Saunders; and the Executive Secretary Dave Brigham. 

ALUMNI OFFICERS, 52-53 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein Made President. Colonel O. H. 
Saunders, 1st Vice President. J. Homer Remsberg, 2nd Vice 

President 




Pres. Goldstein 



DR. GOLDSTEIN. Class of 1912, School 
of Medicine, is a native of Baltimore 
who served as President of the Medical 
Alumni Association and two terms as 
President of the Uni- 
versity's Alumni Club 
in Baltimore. He is a 
past President of the 
Mid-Atlantic Urologi- 
■ cal Society and of the 
^ I Baltimore City Medi- 
I cal Society. He is 
I Medical Director and 
j^^^QI > '" "" Sinai Hos- 

^k fl| H the University's Medi- 

Rk >H I cal School. He is a 

well known author on 

systems of surgery 

and a national recognized authority on 

surgical urology. 

Saunders Veep 

First Vice President — 0. H. Saunders. 
Class of 1910, College of Engineering, is 
a retired Army Colonel. Colonel Saunders 
is now a practicing attorney in Washing- 
ton, D. C. and is a native of Maryland's 
Eastern Shore. He was commissioned a 
Second Lieutenant in Infantry in 1910 and 
served through all grades to the rank of 
Colonel. He saw service in Europe and the 
Far East including the Philippine Islands 
and China. For a period he was Director of 
the Command and General Staff School 
at Fort Leavenworth. Kansas. Col. Saun- 
ders has just completed two terms as 
President of the University's Engineering 
Alumni Association and has served during 
that period on the General Alumni Council. 

Second Vice President — J. Homer Rems- 
berg, of Middletown. is a member of the 
Class of 1918, College of Agriculture. An 
outstanding farmer, Mr. Remsberg is Presi- 



dent of the Maryland and Virginia Milk 
Producers Association. He is also Presi- 
dent of the Maryland Pure Breed Dairy 
Association. Vice President of the Hoist ein 
Friesian Association of America and a 
Director of both the Maryland State Fair 
and Agricultural Society and the Maryland 
Artificial Breeding Association. In 1949 
Mr. Remsberg was awarded the Certificate 
of Merit for "Meritorious service in the 
promotion and development of Agriculture 
in the State of Maryland" by the Univers- 
ity's Board of Regents. 

In World Wor I 

Mr. Remsberg served as an Ensign, 
U. S. Navy, in World War I and has been 
extremely active in both veterans and 
agricultural organizations. He served as 
President of the Agricultural Alumni As- 





Leit 



ALUMNI VICE PRESIDENTS 

: Colonel O. H. Saunders. U.S.A. (Ret. 

(Eng. '10) 
Right: J. Homer Remsberg (Agric. '18) 



» 




"STA'S AND BA'S, SUH!" 

Paul E. Mullinix (Agr. '36) Identifies the 
Richmond Alumni Club's Table at Homecoming 
by display of the Confederacy's Stars and Bars. 
Paul had the pass word and countersign to take 
him through the Union Lines. 



sociation for two terms and has been on 
the governing boards of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation since 1946. 

4,000 Come Home 

Alumni returned in record numbers to 
enjoy the 1952 Homecoming and a 
Terrapin victory over Louisiana State. 
Featured were the classes of '02. '22, '27, 
and '32. which had separate meetings in 
the Rossborough Inn and the Student Rec- 
reation Hall. A special feature of the 
Luncheon, attended by approximately 
1400. was the Richmond Alumni Club. 

Of the 4000 Alumni who attended on 
Homecoming Day, an estimated 700 stayed 
for the post-game mixer in the Dining 
Hall. Alumni of the College Park Schools 
held business sessions and elected officers. 
Many made the trip around the campus 
and surrounding areas to see prize winning 
house decorations and to enjoy a visit 
to the new Chapel. A jam-packed day 
concluded with the Homecoming Dance 
in the Armory. 

1952 Elections 

Six College Park School Associations 
elected officers and Board members on 
Homecoming Da.y. Results of these an- 
nual meetings which also found a deci- 
sion to hold future elections in the Spring 
of the year are as follows : 
Agriculture — Lee W. Adkins, '42. Presi- 
dent; Clayton Reynolds '22. Vice-Pres.; 
Roger W. Cohill '47, Secretary; Abram Z. 
Gottwals '38; Beatrice Y. Jafreti '34; Col. 



Mahlon Haines '96; Homer J. Remsberg 
"18: Paul Mullinix '36: George Worrilow 

'27; William Evans '26: Otis S. Twilley '21. 
Ajbts ami Sciences — William H. Press '28, 
President: Marjorie Wharton '41. Vice- 
President : Elizabeth Eppley '25, Secretary; 
C. C. Donovan '17; P. S. Poelma '50; 
Charles Woodward '41; Lois Krnest '38; 
Dr. Roy K. Skipton '42; Albert P. Heagy 
"30; Temple D. Jarrell '09: Ralph G. Shur 
'32; Dr. R. F. Healy '30. 
Business and Public Administration — 
Norman S. Sinclair '43. President ; Alvin S. 
Klein '37. Vice-President ; David M. Gru- 
ber '45. Secretary; Charles B. Brantner '49; 
Roger L. Odette '52; Walter Myers '50; 
Joseph Longridge '26; Charles B. Sewell 
'49; Talbot T. Speer '17: Harry A. Boswell, 
Jr. '42; Xorman Glasgow '43; Joseph H. 
Fitzpatrick, Jr. '49. 

Education — Louise Sudlow '50. President ; 
Stewart McCaw '35. Vice-Pres; Mrs. Flor- 
ence Duke '50. Secretary; Dr. Donald 
Maley '50: Joan Mattingly '51; Patricia 
Scanlon '50; John P. Speicher '41; Evelyn 
K. Tenny '28; June Jacobs Brown '48. 
Engineering — S. Chester Ward '32. Presi- 
dent ; C. A. Wharthen '08. Vice-Pres.; 
John C. Dye '34. Secretary: C. V. Koons 
'29; Col. 6. H. Saunders '10; George A. 
Wick '23: Harold Eart '42; Everett S. 
Lank '34; J. C. Forsyth '48. 
Home Economics — Mrs. George Lankford 
'26. President ; Mrs. Carlisle Humelsine 
'39. Vice-Pres.; Mrs. Paul Xystrom '32. 
Recording Seel.; Mrs. Carvel Bowen '26, 
Corres. Secretary; Mrs. Fred Tuemmler 
'29, Treasurer; Gertrude X. Bowie '34; 
Carolyn Coppinger '30; Lucy Knox '24; 
Mrs. Curry Xourse England '30. 

New England Homecoming 

More than three hundred alumni of the 
six Xew England states commenced a 
week-end of festivity with a banquet at 





A QUEEN IS CROWNED 

Elizabeth Poisal. 19. Junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, from Hedgeville, W. Va., is 
crowned 1952 Homecoming Queen by Brigadier General A. F. Gearhard. as Tippy Stringer, 1951 
Homecoming Queen, beams approval. 



"NOW HEAR THIS!" 

Outgoing Alumni President Talbot T. Speer 
makes an Announcement at the Alumni Home- 
coming Dinner, flanked by General Alumni 
Secretary Dave Brigham. 



Boston's University Club on October 31. 
Toastmaster for the occasion was Munro 
Leaf '27 of Ferdinand the Bull fame. 
The program was under the direction of 
Karl Fasick. President of the Xew England 
Alumni Club. Hiehliehting the banquet 
was a talk by Dr. H. C. Byrd and a visit 
from Coach Jim Tatum. Judge William P. 
Cole. Jr.. Chairman of the Board of Re- 
gents, also addressed the group and intro- 
duced two other members of the Board in 
attendance. They were J. Milton Patter- 
son. Treasurer, and B. Herbert Brown. Jr. 
Dr. William G. Beland '14 was presented 
a large plaque containing the Maryland 
seal and an expression of appreciation from 
the Club for his efforts as its founder and 
inspiration behind the organization. Dr. 
Beland is Honorary President of the Club. 

Bus Bears Band 

The University Band, scheduled for the 
cider and gingerbread Mixer following the 
banquet, suffered a series of bus break- 
downs and was unable to attend. In addi- 
tion to Alumni Secretary Dave Brigham. 
the University was also represented by 
Dean Gery Eppley, Mark Shoemaker. 
George Fogg and Agricultural alumni Pres- 
ident Abram Z. Gottwals. 

Xumerous Club members participated in 
the Homecoming planning. Alexander Ra- 
bins directed arrangements and tickets. 
Miss Grace McCormack was in charge of 
hotel accommodations and Dr. Joseph Car- 
valho. who has done such a fine job on 
membership, directed the finances. Special 
credit goes to President Karl Fasick, Sec- 
retary Gerald Fosbroke, and State Vice- 
Presidents Dr. Gerald St. Marie of Massa- 
chusetts. Dr. Roland Leahy of Xew Hamp- 
shire. Dr. P. J. Lessard of Maine, Dr. Ed- 
ward Morin of Rhode Island, Dr. H. B. 
Small of Vermont, and Dr. Walter S. 
Longo of Connecticut. 

The Schenectady Alumni Club was rep- 
resented at the head table by Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Esher. 

A large section of Fenway Park was 



turned over to alumni and students of the 
University attending the Boston U. game. 
Alumni left feeling the success of the 
team and the support of Xew England 
area graduates had more than justified the 
enthusiastic efforts of alumni officers and 
committee members. 



Essay Contesf 



The University Library is sponsoring 
an essay contest for undergraduates in 
conjunction with the Peter Pauper Press 
on the subject "The Book(s) in My Life." 

The winner of the contest will receive 
ten classics of his or her own choice from 
the Peter Pauper Press. The second place 
contestant will be given his choice of five 
volumes. 




"BIG JIM" 

Maryland's Head Football Coach and Direc- 
tor of Athletics, James M. Tatum, sighting in 
on the Clemson-Maryland Homecoming Game. 



SUNPAPERS AID JOURNALISM 

Integrated Program of Required Study Made Possible by 
Cooperation of Baltimore Sunpapers with University of 

Maryland 




Mr. Swanson 



A PROGRAM of practical training on 
the Baltimore Sunpapers has been es- 
tablished for journalism majors. 

"Through the co-operation of Neil H. 
Swanson, executive editor of the Sun- 
papers," said Presi- 
dent H. C. Byrd, "the 
facilities of their news 
rooms and feature de- 
partments and the su- 
pervision of Sunpa- 
pers personnel have 
been made available 
for an integrated pro- 
gram of required study 
and training of our 
seniors in journalism." 
The program is now 
in its second year. It 
grew out of a series of 
nine lectures on "Newspaper Making" de- 
livered annually by Mr. Swanson to the 
students preparing to become professionals 
in newspaper work. The university plans 
to publish the lectures as a service to the 
public and the newspaper profession. 

This cooperative enterprise has become 
a required part of the journalism curricu- 
lum. Seniors enrolled in advanced report- 
ing spend their laboratory time each week 
with Sun reporters on city hall, police, and 
other regular beats. 

For Practical Experience 

"The objective", commented Alfred 
Crowell, head of the Department of Jour- 
nalism and Public Relations, "is to ac- 
quaint our students with actual working 
conditions on these beats, under the guid- 
ance of professional reporters and editors, 
and to give them the opportunity to com- 
pare their own copy with that of men and 
women who make their living writing it 
for the Sun." 

One of the chief benefits, Dr. Byrd said, 
is that the student sees local government 
in action after studying theories of it 
in the classroom. 

Advanced editing students will spend 
their laboratory time each week at the 
Sun copyreading and rewrite desks. The 
purpose is to provide the students with a 
well-rounded, first-hand view of newspaper 
making, from the original gathering of 
facts through the careful editing and re- 
checking that characterizes the handling 
of copy for publication in the Sunpapers. 

One Day "Take Over" 

Once each year, a group of student edi- 
tors "takes over" The Evening Sun for a 
day. They go out on the beats with regu- 
lar reporters, prepare their copy for publi- 
cation on the regular copydesk, and are 
responsible for the production of one com- 
plete news and feature page. In this oper- 
ation, they are under the direct supervision 
of Philip Heisler. managing editor of The 
Evening Sun. 



By the end of the 1952-3 school year, 
all students enrolled in professional jour- 
nalism courses will have heard Mr. Swan- 
son's lectures. 

Newspaper making, as he sees it, centers 
around the metropolitan newspaper's duty 
to report all the facts the reader needs to 
live intelligently in a modern democratic 
society, and to "tell the reader what the 
news means, not in terms of personal 
opinion, but in terms of all the pertinent 
facts that put it into context." 

"It is the function and the responsibility 
of a good metropolitan newspaper," Mr. 
Swanson tells the students, "to gather all 
the important news of the day, to write it 
accurately, objectively and clearly, and to 
display it in the proper perspective of its 
relative importance." 

"But," he adds, "a newspaper may per- 
form these functions perfectly and yet fail 
in its responsibility to the public. It will 
fail unless it makes itself regarded, by a 
major part of its community, not only as 
an always honest and objective newspaper 
but also as an always interesting news- 
paper. Both of these purposes can be 
accomplished." 

Newspapers are Changing 

His lectures, therefore, deal not only 
with the techniques of newspaper making, 
but also with underlying principles and 
theories and the elements of art, science 
and psychology that enter into it. 

He encourages students to prepare for 
careers in professional journalism by say- 
ing that newspapers are changing to meet 
the complexities of a changing world, that 
new ideas and new techniques must be 



developed "and you may be the ones to 
do it," and that now, more than ever be- 
fore, newspaper work offers opportunities 
for growth, for material success and for 
"the kind of career that will be satisfying 
when the time comes to look back on 
what you have done with your life." 

"Who's Who in America" lists Mr. Swan- 
son as an editor, novelist and historian. 

Since he became executive editor of the 
Sunpapers in 1942, men in their news de- 
partments have won five Pulitzer prizes, 
including the 1946 gold medal for "dis- 
interested and meritorious public service." 
In 1947 he supervised establishment of the 
Sunpapers' television station, WMAR-TV. 

"Unconquered" and "The First Rebel," 
two of his eight historical books, have 
been made into motion pictures. 



Diamondback Wins 

The Diamondback, Maryland's student 
semi-weekly news tabloid and consistent 
winner of national honors, was again 
awarded First Class Honor rating by the 
Associated Collegiate Press for the spring 
1952 semester. 

Although 15 points shy of an All-Ameri- 
can rating, the highest honor a collegiate 
newspaper can attain, the Diamondback 
nevertheless rose five points from the fall 
1951-52 total, when the paper was awarded 
All-American standing. 

The minimum attainable score for an 
All-American rating, which was set at 1,000 
for the spring semester, is raised each 
semester as college newspaper standards 
improve. 

Edited by Phillip C. Geraci, the news- 
paper received "excellent" ratings on news 
coverage, news style, page make-up, head- 
lines and sports coverage. 

• ••• • • • •.• • 
Good Leadership 

Good leadership consists of the ability 
to impose your will upon others without 
incurring their opposition, ill will or re- 
sentment. This can best be accomplished 
by example. 




Members of the Class of '22 at '52 Homecoming 
Game. 



THIRTIETH REUNION 

in the stands for the Clemson-Maryland Football 



6] 



LANGUAGE ARTS PROGRAM 

National Council of Teachers of English Presents Report of 

Six Years of Study 




Smith 



By Dr. Dora V. Smith 

Director of the Commission on the 

English Curriculum 

(Excerpts from an address by Dr. Smith at 

the conference on the new English curriculum 

held by the College of Education. University of 

Maryland.) 

THE English Languagt Art*. Volume 
I of the curriculum series of the Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English, pre- 
sents the results of six years of study and 
deliberation of a Commission on the Eng- 
lish Curriculum com- 
posed of thirty-one 
members representing 
all sections of the 
country and all levels 
of the school system 
from the pre-school 
through the graduate 
school. * 

Believing that 
growth in language is 
a continuous process, 
the Commission set 
up committees in 
reading, writing, 
speaking, and listening which also ranged 
in membership from the pre-school 
through the graduate school. Each mem- 
ber of such a vertical committee was chair- 
man of a horizontal committee of teachers 
actually at work in the classroom at his 
level of the school system. These com- 
mittees gathered from schools throughout 
the country illustrations of practices rec- 
ommended by the Commission. 

To Think Clearly 

Part I opens with a statement of the 
aims of teaching English: to help boys 
and girls and young people to think 
clearly and honestly, to read thoughtfully. 
to communicate effectively, and to listen 
intelligently. There is nothing new about 
these aims; it is the setting in which they 
are to be achieved that makes the differ- 
ence. Ours is an age in which the struggle 
is for the minds of men. It forces us to 
sense the instrumental character of lan- 
guage. It puts at the heart of the program 
the giving and receiving of ideas through 
verbal symbols. It unites a social and a 
psychological factor with a linguistic one. 
It gives to the teaching of the arts of 
communication a central and a vital role 
in the education of young people today. 

Moreover, the American people have 
willed that all of their sons and daughters 
shall be educated to the limit of their 
capacity as persons, as members of social 
groups, as citizens, and as workers. Lan- 
guage, as an instrument of all learning 
and of all human relations, has a powerful 
part to play in such a program. Literature. 
by reason of its artistic form, can grip 
both mind and heart as it helps young 
people to deepen their insight into human 
experience, to broaden their outlook upon 
both past and present, to quicken their 
appreciation of literary excellence. 



* Appleton - Century - Crofts Company, 1952. 
Price $3.75. Members may order from the Coun- 
cil office for $2.25. 



"Language power," wrote the Commis- 
sion, "is not something in the back of 
one's head which he can remember if he 
thinks long enough; it is the ability to 
think and to act in the right way at the 
right moment, and is developed only 
through a long series of experiences in 
trying to act in the appropriate way in a 
similar situation." "What are the lan- 
guage processes of democracy?" the Com- 
mission asked itself. "How should English 
be taught in a land where respect for in- 
dividuality is coupled with associative 
thinking and group decision? What re- 
sponsibilities does freedom of speech place 
upon speaker and writer? Upon reader 
and listener? What added problems arise 
in an age when mass modes of communi- 
cation are available to all who struggle 
to control the minds of men?" 

Studied Youth 

Through the aid of its committees at 
different levels of instruction, members 
of the Commission studied the growth of 
young people at different stages of their 
development, attempting to use such 
knowledge as a basis for the sequence of 
offerings throughout the program. Out of 
such study came the conviction that 
growth in language power is not a matter 
of assigning different topics for study in 
different grades of the school system, but 
rather the careful nurture of individual 
pupils in clearly defined aspects of growth 
in thought and expression, in social insight 
and adjustment, in aesthetic appreciation. 
and in the skills of reading and listening. 

What is "English?" 

The term English proved a troublesome 
one in intercommunication among com- 
mittees. English at the elementary school 
level does not include reading, and in some 
schools, excludes literature. At the high 
school level English may or may not em- 
brace speech. At the college or university 
level the English department sometimes is 
concerned with speech and sometimes is 
not. Frequently, it controls the courses in 
composition, but not the programs in com- 
munication. Sometimes it offers both and 
sometimes neither. Because of a convic- 
tion concerning the essential interrelated- 
ness of all areas of communication, the 
Commission adopted the term, the Eng- 
lish Language Arts to cover a unified pro- 
gram in reading, writing, speaking, and 
listening. 

One member of the Commission was 
appointed to correspond with all the ma- 
jor school systems now making use of 
core curricula and to discover the place of 
English in them. Enthusiasm for core 
courses runs high among some English 
teachers. Discouragement is rife among 
others. Certain generalizations are made 
in the chapter on the basis of the evidence 
disclosed : 

1. Where the base of a core program is 
narrow — a mere union of English and 
social studies — English tends to suffer be- 
cause personal values are often forgotten 



in pursuit of social problems. However, 
where the base is an analysis of the needs 
of boys and girls as individual persons, 
as members of social groups, as citizens. 
and as workers, all aspects of the language 
arts, including literature and creative writ- 
ing, may play a vital part in the program. 

2. The success of the core course is in 
direct proportion to the breadth of train- 
ing of the teacher in both English and 
social studies. 

3. No core program can hope to succeed 
unless entered into voluntarily by the 
teachers concerned and explained fully to 
the parents of the children involved. 

4. English expression and breadth of 
reading profit from motivation in normal 
situations. There seems to be no evidence 
to suggest that skills in reading and ex- 
pression sutler i n a well taught core pro- 
gram. 

Personal Values 

5. In literature and creative expression 
there are personal values which must be 
consciously sought or they may be lost 
in a core curriculum. 

The chapter wrestles with the age-old 
problem of grammar. The Commission 
realized that a controversial question like 
this one could be approached only through 
the route of scholarship and research to 
prepare a fifteen page section on the 
English language as a changing instrument 
of communication with evidence of what 
usage is currently acceptable at different 
social levels. A classroom teacher known 
to represent a point of view half way be- 
tween extremes was asked to prepare a 
description of how necessary grammar can 
be taught in relation to the expression of 
ideas. Still a third writer analyzed the 
points of difficulty peculiar to the English 
language in contrast to Latin. 

Speech and writing as aspects of a single 
problem, have many elements in com- 
mon — the need for observation of and 
reflection upon experience, the selection 
of ideas with a purpose and a reader or 
listener in mind, the organization and 
presentation of ideas effectively for others. 
Both require clear thinking, personal in- 
tegrity, and disciplined use of language. 

Divergent Skills 

Emphasis is placed upon the divergent 
skills involved in each — problems of voice, 
of oral usage, of personal adjustment to 
an audience and the like as contrasted with 
the writing skills of spelling, punctuation, 
capitalization, and manuscript form. 

One chapter presents the neglected 
skill of listening. Its first interest is in 
the importance of listening in modern life. 
One writer believes that the "era of dic- 
tatorships and totalitarianism has indi- 
cated to the world that future civiliza- 
tions will be saved or destroyed by those 
who listen." 

Another bemoans the effect of non- 
critical listening to the radio or platform 
oration: 

"As speakers, men have become schooled 
in the arts of persuasion, and without the 
counter art of listening a man can be per- 
suaded even by his own words to eat 
foods that ruin his liver, to abstain from 
killing flies, to vote away his right to vote, 
and to murder his fellows in the name of 
righteousness. The art of listening holds 



[8] 



for us the desperate hope of withstanding 
the spreading ravages of commercial, na- 
tionalistic, and ideological persuasion. Un- 
less the gentle watchword "Listen" be- 
comes an arresting command, we may not 
halt in time the stampede of humanity in 
its pursuit of the- enchanting tootling of 
the Pied Piper of Doom!" 

The book reviews what is known about 
listening to structured and non-structured 
speech. 

"Do you listen more than you talk dur- 
ing a school day? 

Do you stimulate children to speak 
more than a single word or sentence in 
response to a question? 

Are your questions so thought-provok- 
ing that your question time is less than 
your answer time?" 

The book urges the importance of un- 
derstanding the controls back of radio, 
television, films, newspapers, and maga- 
zines, of developing standards for selection 
and critical examination of their offerings 
and of helping students make wise use of 
such media. 

Study Recommended 

The Commission was unanimous in its 
recommendation that a study of the his- 
tory of English or American literature be 
left for the college years and that prepa- 
ration for college center upon wide lead- 
ing of material, especially prose, demand- 
ing a high level of maturity in thought, 
in comprehension, and in appreciation. 

Any program which recognizes language 
as a social and psychological instrument 
raises for itself many problems of evalua- 
tion. It combines with a full considera- 
tion of standardized tests of skill in read- 
ing, writing, speaking, and listening, evi- 
dences of growth in appreciation of litera- 
ture, in range and maturity of reading, 
in social adjustment, in guest-host rela- 
tions, and in all aspects of the program 
for which measures are now available. 

The National Council of Teachers of 
English has not attempted to create a 
program for the nation. It has merely 
raised issues, illustrated practices, and 
demonstrated a means of approach to 
curriculum making. If this effort serves to 
stimulate teachers throughout the country 
to a similar investigation in their own 
school systems, it will have successfully 
performed its function. 



U. S. FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

Executive Branch, Senate and House Charged with Various 
Responsibilities in Overseas Relations 



Memorial Chapel 

The Rev. Bryan Green, rector of St. 
Martin's-in-the-Bull-Ring Church of Birm- 
ingham. England, made his fourth ap- 
pearance at Maryland in the Memorial 
Chapel. He delivered "A Definite Message 
for Student.- Today." Rev. Green then 
conducted an informal discussion. Dr. 
Westervelt Romaine, assistant professor 
of music, played the chimes before the 
address. 

Presented by the Religious Life Com- 
mittee, the University's first Thanksgiving 
Convocation was held in the Memorial 
Chapel. Dr. H. C. Byrd introduced t he 
main speaker. Chief Chaplain of the United 
States Air Force, Charles I. Carpenter. 
Under the direction of Fague Springmann, 
the Chapel Choir sang two Thanks- 
giving hymns, Beethoven's "The Heavens 
Are Telling" and a Welsh carol. 




Millikan 



By George Lee Millikan, Ph.D. 



(Ph.D.. Yale, '42, former member of the staff 
of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
former member of the staff of the Brookings 
Institution. Dr. Millikan, who died recently, 
was a Lecturer in Government and Politics at 
the University of Maryland, College of Special 
and Continuation Studies.) 



TO many people, the control of foreign 
relations by Congress means control 
of major decisions by the Senate. The 
examples that readily come to mind are 
the United Nations Charter, the North 
Atlantic Treaty, and 
— to an older genera- 
tion — the rejection of 
the Versailles Treaty 
after the First World 
War. The decisions on 
these treaties are his- 
toric ones in American 
foreign policy, an 1 
they were made by 
the Senate alone, so 
far as Congress is con- 
cerned. But there are 
many more decisions 
of policy, just as im- 
portant, that were and are being made la- 
the Senate and the House of Representa- 
tives together. 

This is not to diminish the importance 
of the Senate; its power over treaties is 
exclusive as far as the House of Repre- 
sentatives is concerned, and explicitly pro- 
vided in the Constitution. The House of 
Representatives has a coordinate role with 
the Senate on all matters of foreign rela- 
tions other than the confirmation of ap- 
pointments and advice and consent to 
ratification of treaties. Indeed, so far as 
foreign policy may involve appropriations, 
the House in the strictest sense may have 
a predominant role, for it is a well settled 
rule thai appropriation hills, like revenue 
bills, must originate in the House of Rep- 
resentatives. The fact is that many deci- 
sions of foreign policy require either money 
or legal authority which only Congress 
can give. And these questions are de- 
cided within the general legislative powers 
of Congress granted in the Constitution 
which require the action of both House 
and Senate. 

Congress Sets Fromework 

The broad extent of Congressional con- 
trol over foreign affairs is not generally 
realized, for Americans are accustomed 
to the notion that foreign policy is largely 
controlled by the Executive Branch, headed 
by the President . Congress does not make 
the day-to-day decisions, it does not in- 
struct our representatives abroad, it dues 
not conduct negotiations, nor does it deal 
directly with other foreign governments. 
The role of Congre>s is to set the frame- 
work of policy on these matters where it 
has a power of decision; and to exercise 
a power of review over executive action in 



the held. This now includes a wide rangi 
an 1 variety of matters. 

A review of the last few years will indi- 
cate the extent of congressional participa- 
tion in foreign affairs. In addition to the 
major treaties acted on by the Senate. 
there are the European Recovery Program. 
the Mutual Defense Assistance Program, 
the Point Four Program, assistance to 
Yugoslavia and India, the British loan. 
the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Program. 
assistance to Greece and Turkey, the Mu- 
tual Security Program, and a host of other 
matters. In each of these cases, the Presi- 
dent requested legislation from Congress 
and proposed the policy in legislative 
form. Congress enacted the necessary legis- 
lation, sometimes according to the Presi- 
dent's wishes, and sometimes not. Many 
important aspects of policy are found in 
statutory provisions that originated in the 
Congress and are now binding on the 
President. 

Funds from Congress 

Each year, the executive agencies han- 
dling matters of foreign relations must 
come to Congress for operating funds. At 
this time, the appropriate committees of 
both houses want to know about what is 
to be done, what has been done, and why. 
Their judgment, and that of the Congress. 
directly affects future executive action 
since it determines the amounts of money 
to be granted and the purposes for which 
it will be available. 

All of this means a wide range of ac- 
tivity for both houses of Congress. It cer- 
tainly does for the House of Representa- 
tives. A few statistics will illustrate the 
extent to which the House of Representa- 
tives and its Committee on Foreign Affairs 
have been concerned. During the first 
session of the Eighty-First Congress- - 
from January to October. 1949— about 200 
measures were referred to the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs. The Committee con- 
sidered 109 of these, and reported 57 of 
them to the House favorably. 48 of this 
number passed the House and 35 of the 
48 became law. In this legislative activity, 
the Committee field 263 hearing sessions, 
took 9419 pages of testimony, and heard 
634 witnesses. 949 pages of reports were 
written, and 707 pages of the Congressional 
Record were taken up by the House in 
considering these measures. During these 
ten months, the measures considered by 
the Committee and enacted into law au- 
thorized the sum of 811,893.230.000. 

Some of these measures represented 
major decisions of policy; the funds alone 
are important enough. It is enough to say 
that for the foreseeable future, the world 
position of the United States will in all 
likelihood continue to require Congres- 
sional participation in the conduct of for- 
eign relations. And as long as this is the 
case, both Houses of the Congress will 
have a great deal to say about our foreign 
policy. 



[9] 




FROM OVERSEAS 

While the University of Maryland student 
body includes undergraduates from many coun- 
tries all over the world, their dress and conduct 
on the campus is, of course, quite American. 

However, the International Club, at a cos- 
tume party, came up with a few of the foreign 
students in the garb of their respective native 
countries, two from the Netherlands flanked 
by two from Japan. They are Reiko Yoko- 
yamma, Louis Cremers, Carolyn Amundson, 
and Toshio Keta. 



From Copenhagen 

In a combination role of sponsor, foster 
parent, and college dean to 54 women 
students from 20 countries, the American 
Association of University Women has an- 
nounced it will spend an estimated $123,- 
000 in the 1952-53 year. 

This is the seventh year the Association 
has provided international grants under 
a program established to give women from 
abroad training for constructive service 
in their homelands, and also to further 
international understanding. 

Studying at the University of Mary- 
land's new psychiatric institute will be the 
chief psychiatrist of the Copenhagen, Den- 
mark police department, Dr. Emma Veste- 
gaard. Also currently working with the 
Medical Service of the Supreme Bench of 
Baltimore, she is observing how American 
court psychiatrists diagnose, classify, and 
treat delinquents. She is particularly in- 
terested in modern methods which produce 
the best rehabilitation results. 

Commenting on the favorable oppor- 
tunities offered in the United Stales for 
training of a court psychiatrist, Dr. Veste- 
gaard said this country was wonderful for 
her work, "because here there are so many 
murders. In Denmark, there arc very 
few." 



Blood Drive 

The University blood drive held a one- 
day stand on campus and collected 274 
pints of blood — 10 pints over the estab- 
lished quota for the first of two drives on 
campus. 

"The campus blood drive was certainly 
successful and I want to thank the stu- 
dents for their co-operation," commented 
Kittv Patrick, chairman. 



The turn-out of students who wished to 
donate was much larger than expected and 
many had to be turned away because 
facilities were inadequate. 

Miss Patrick added, "The semiannual 
drive will be held again in the spring, 
when two units will be necessary to ac- 
commodate the large turn-out of donors." 

The general College Park area is not 
meeting its quota of 1000 pints per month, 
and it is hoped that the contributions 
from the Universitv will boost the cause. 



The Chapel's Silver 

The beautifully elaborate communion set 
in the University's new memorial chapel is 
a gift from Henry Powell Hopkins, Jr., 
a Silversmith of the old school who gained 
his skill in a modern manner. 

One of a handful of Marylanders en- 
gaged in t he almost lost craft of hand- 
wrought silversmithing, he is believed to 
be the only one in the State who holds a 
diploma in that art. 

A graduate of the Boston Museum 
School of Fine Arts, one of the few Amer- 
ican institutions offering a silversmithing 
course, he also has studied in the British 
Isles, France and Scandinavia. 

Son of a Baltimore Architect. Mr. Hop- 
kins showed early that he had inherited 
some of his father's aptitude for drawing, 
but it was a summer job fourteen years 
ago, when he was a student at St. Pauls 
School, that gave direction to his talents. 
The job was in the chasing department 
of a local silver manufacturing firm, and 
he liked it so well that he went back to 
work there the next summer. Following 
a year at Gow School in South Wales, New 
York, he enrolled in the general design 
course at the Maryland Institute. After 
one year he joined the U. S. Navy and 
was in service for five years. After World 
War II he entered the Boston Museum 
School of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. At the end of the fourth year he 
was offered a scholarship for a fifth year, 
and at the completion of his fifth year 
he was given his diploma and a traveling 
fellowship to the British Isles. Scandinavia 
and France. 

He opened his studio in Baltimore in 
the fall of 1951. 



University Theatre 

The first fall production of the Univer- 
sity Theatre was "You Can't Take it With 
You," the well-known comedy by Moss 
Hart and George Kauffman. 

The play was under the direction of E. 
Thomas Starcher of the speech depart- 
ment. Out of a nineteen member cast, 
only three had appeared previously on 
the University stage. 

Members of the cast were. Harriet Men- 
dels, Elizabeth Knox. Dinky Engel. An- 
drew Burgoyne, Jerry Sidle, John Powell, 
Harold Teagle and Delores Medlock. 

Also included were Ralph Weingarden. 
Parker Fairlamb, Elizabeth Spurr, Carl 
Friedler, Sue Spencer. Fred Applestein. 
Rhoda Greenberg, Floyd Peterson, Jack 
Yoss, and Willis Longyear. Betty Skeats 
served as assistant director, while Bill 
Price was stage manager. 



The University of Maryland presented 
George Bernard Shaw's "Candida." in the 
University's Theatre-in-the-Round. 

The production was directed by Ed Call, 
senior speech major. Assistant director 
was Ed Walsh. Dr. Grover C. Niemeyer, 
assistant professor in the speech depart- 
ment, served as faculty advisor. 

Playing the role of Candida was Pat 
Kirkpatriek. Others included Fred Dallam. 
Douglas Seigel, Ramon Steinberg, Lyn 
Cadsey, and Eugene Langelotto. 

The second major production was 
Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." 

The play was directed by John 
M. Coppinger of the Speech Department. 
Aiding him were assistant director Sue 
Lynch, junior in Arts and Sciences, and 
stage manager Jane Cahill, junior in Home 
Economics. 

Jim Radomski, a veteran U.T. per- 
former, and Dolores Aluise played the 
leading roles of Romeo and Juliet. 

Others featured in the cast included 
Jerry Gough, William Gough, Stanley 
Kruger, Ralph Weingarden, Andrew Bur- 
goyne, Parker Fairlamb, Vernon DeVinney, 
Eleanor Weinstein, Borah Z. Burman. 
Elizabeth Knox, John Yeabower, Donald 
Peacock. Carl Friedler and Clarita Wat- 
kins. 



Fire Fighters 



The University played host to an ad- 
vanced conference on automatic sprinkler 
systems, sponsored by the National Fed- 
eration of Mutual Insurance Companies. 

The meetings covered technical and 
comprehensive subjects with attendance 
by engineers from insurance companies 
from many points in the United States. 
It is the only such conference in the coun- 
try and was the third in a series. 

Robert C. Byrus, director of the Uni- 
versity's fire service extension, was ap- 
pointed one of five judges determined the 
winner of the National Fire Prevention 
Week Contest. 

The contest was participated in by 
some 3.000 fire companies throughout the 
country from October 5 to 11. The awards 
to winners will be made sometime in Jan- 
uary in Boston. The three-month delay 
was necessitated in order that the various 
fire companies could get their annual re- 
ports in to the judges. 

In the recently conducted U.S. Chamber 
of Commerce survey, the most popular 
of the many nationally staged "weeks" 
proved to be "Fire Prevention Week." 



Firemen Honor Byrd 

Dr. H. C. Byrd. President of the Uni- 
versity, was the guest of honor at the Ta- 
koma Park Volunteer Fire Department 
annual Banquet, Silver Spring. He was 
presented with a scroll in recognition of 
his outstanding work in advancing the 
Firemen's Training Program. 



Dean Cotterman 

Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, Dean of the 
Faculty, was re-elected to the Executive 
Committee of the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 



10 




NEW LIBRARY 

Architect's drawing of the new library which will be placed on the west end of the campus behind 
the coeds' dorms. Plans are complete for the four-story building. Only funds are lacking before 
construction begins. 



New Library 



Plans for the 243 by 119 foot, four-story 
University Library have been completed. 
It will house approximately 500.000 vol- 
umes. 

The ground floor will contain a visual 
aids library which will be heavily used by 
education people and the faculty. A pre- 
view room where film can be reviewed and 
a micro-photo room with dark room facili- 
ties will also be located on the first floor. 

The card catalog, reference room, maps 
and documents will be on the second floor, 
in addition to a social science room con- 
taining 10.000 volumes on open shelves. 

General administrative offices along with 
the processing and loan department will 
have second floor locations. 

A periodical room, with 10,000 volumes 
on open shelves, a humanities room, 
browsing, conference, and typing rooms 
will be available to students on the third 
floor. 

The Maryland Room, containing mate- 
rial about the State and University, pub- 
lished by Maryland people, including the 
faculty, will be found on the fourth floor. 
A special collections room, along with a 
music and fine arts room will be fourth 
floor attractions. The music and fine arts 
room will have listening booths, records, 
and be used for exhibition of student 
paintings. 

Study rooms, carrels, will be scattered 
throughout the Library. 

Other construction to get underway very 
shortly is sorority and fraternity row which 
wdl be located on the old football field. 

Bids are out for the student union and 
physical education and activities building. 
The latter will cover a city block. 

The old greenhouses, near the Adminis- 
tration building, are now being torn down, 
and the small brick building being used by 
the botany department is expected to 
come down shortly. Eventually an annex 
to the Administration building will be 
built there. 

A two-story industrial arts building, 
located beyond the chemistry building, is 



under construction now. 

Two dormitories, following the design 
of Dorm III. but slightly modified, have 
been planned. The women's dorm will be 
located between Margaret Brent and Anne 
Arundel halls and the men's by the old 
gym. 



New Greenhouses 

Open house was held in the recently 
completed greenhouse range, located on 
the Washington boulevard next to the 
Service building, to florists, floriculturists, 
and the public. 

The range is made up of six detached 
even span houses, 32 by 152 feet, connected 
by corridors. Four of the houses are new, 
of Ickes Braun construction, while two 
were moved from the old location behind 
the men's dormitories. 

The departments of Horticulture. Bot- 
any, Agronomy, and Entomology share 
the facilities of the six houses, divided 
into 27 compartments, each of which has 
individual temperature control and steam 
sterilization outlets. Three houses are used 
for floriculture and ornamental horticulture 
research and instruction. 

The range is connected to the greenhouse 
administration building, which houses 
workrooms, storage space, a classroom, a 
research laboratory, and an apartment for 
the greenhouse superintendent. 

Several experiments and projects have 
been started ; a study of the greenhouse 
use of soil conditioners on roses and 
chrysanthemums, as well as a project 
studying methods of soil preparation for 
roses. 

A soil nutrition study for roses is under- 
way, while another study in the fertilizing 
of poinsettia stock plants was made during 
the summer, and the plants grown are 
being carried on to flowering under differ- 
ent fertilizer conditions. 

A breeding program for hydrangeas is 
under way, with several fertilizer and soil 
mixture studies started on azaleas, as well 
as studies of light and temperature in 
relation to azaleas. 




Baltimore 
Business Forms 

SAVE «p * 

y O of your 

TIME 




BALTIMORE Business Forms save you 
time, save you money. Yes, their stream- 
lined designs help speed forms writing. 
Your workers save as much as two 
hours out of every six hours required for 
writing with ordinary business forms. 

Whether you want a salesbook that 
keeps your sales clerks selling instead 
of writing — or whether you want a mul- 
tiple copy form which combines in- 
voices with bills of lading, address 
labels, and accounting copies for one 
easy writing — if will pay you to make 
your next order for business forms an 
order for BALTIMORE Business Forms. 
Then you will make your records by the 
fastest, most efficient, and most eco- 
nomical methods known to the business 
world. 

Write or phone today for samples of 
business forms by BALTIMORE. 

The B altimore Salesbook Company 



3120-56 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 29, Maryland 

GILMOR 8000 
TALBOT T. SPEER (Class of 1917), 

President and General Manager 



11 



dcLito 



rials 



(Continued from page 2) 
might live. "Greater love than this hath 
no man." Sure and certain death rather 
than harm to others. 

Florence Nightingale, "the lady with 
the lamp," serving the suffering; Clara 
Barton, founder of the American Red 
Cross; Abraham Lincoln, who's eyes "saw 
the glory of the coming of the Lord"; 
Tom Edison, laboring far into the night 
for greater comfort for others; William 
Pitt ; SI . Francis of Assissi. The many, 
many men — some of whom can be found 
on our own campus — who reject "bigger 
jobs" in order to do good for others. 

In mentioning the name of Lincoln it is 
pertinent to recall a classic example of 
Lincolnia in the particular premise here- 
in referred to. Upon his re-election in 
1864 Lincoln said. "I am thankful to God 
for this approval by the people. I do not 
impugn the motives of any one opposed 
to me. It is no pleasure to me to triumph 
over any one. I give thanks to the Al- 
mighty for the evidence indicating the 
resolution of the people I strive humbly 
to serve." 

The names casually mentioned above 
represent high principles and high posi- 
tions won by universal reverence and 
honor through piety, patriotism and self- 
abnegation. 

The wife of Zebidee asked for plenty in 
requesting the seats to the left and the 
right. There is room for many such seats 
for those who, by their service and deeds 
and love for others would be too humble 
to worry about seats for themselves. 

From this point of view humanity may 
well be divided into two classes, both of 
which were well known to Jesus: 

1. Those who strive for all things for 
tin tnselves, who are constantly trying to 
save their lives; 

2. Those who continually give tin ir 
lives. 

The first mentioned know few motives 
other than self interest while they worship 
at the golden altar of the great god Am- 
bition, the shrine of idolatry. To them is 
lost the day that fails to bring to them 
gain or pleasure, while they keep at a 
distance anything that might ruffle their 
lives. The desire to "save their lives" 
circumscribes their actions. For them the 
Light of the World had this pertinent 
message: "Whosoever will save his life 
shall lose it, and whosoever shall lose his 
life for My sake shall find it." 

The other class, those who are con- 
stantly giving their lives, constantly per- 
form acts of benevolence, largely prompted 
by their love for others. Ease, pleasure, 
and self interest are not taken into con- 
sideration. Long hours regardless of "busi- 
ness" routines. No vacations when there 
is helpful and constructive work to do for 
hi hers. And the very best of these we 
could not list by name because, relatively 
unknown, they spend their lives in visiting 
the forgotten and the forsaken, the needy 



and t he broken-hearted. 

Who remembers George MacDonald's 
"The Man who was Lord of Fate 
"Born in an ox's stall 
"Was great because He ivas much too 

great 
"To care about greatness at all." 



* • • • • Final 

The citizens of our great country voted 
to have as their President a five star gen- 
eral, oft referred to during the campaign 
as "a military man." 

This is not a political editorial. What is 
hereinafter expressed could apply to can- 
didates from any political party. 

If career, length of service, number of 
years of continuous service in uniform are 
accepted as a criterion Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower is more military than any President 
we've ever had, not excluding Hiram U. S. 
Grant, 

What is a "military" man? One who 
thinks and acts militarily or militant? 
If so the greatest military man we ever 
had at the head of the nation was Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, who figuratively rode into 
office in a Rough Riders' saddle. Worry 
warts wagged their heads as young Vice 
President Roosevelt, following the assassi- 
nation of William McKinley, moved into 
the White House. However, no other 
President's record can match the fact 
that not one single hostile shot was fired 
by or against the United States during 
military Roosevelt's term of office! 

Following the recent Presidential cam- 
paign many experts now state, in retros- 
pect, that Eisenhower probably would 
have been elected with no more effort 
than sitting on his front porch. These 
same experts point out that, while the 
red light was being flashed against a "mil- 
itary" man in the White House, the voters 
of our country, many of whom had served 
in uniform, voted Eisenhower in BE- 
CAUSE HE WAS A MILITARY MAN. 

"He's a good soldier — but, after all, 
a soldier," repeated over and over during 
the crinkum-erankum of the campaign 
did not hold water with the voters. Neither 
were service and ex-service men unaware 
of the fact that diplomacy, foreign gov- 
ernment and politics and the like are 
taught at the Military and Naval Acad- 
emies, probably to a greater degree than 
at other institutions of learning, and that 
General Eisenhower could hardly have 
won 5-star rank, based upon performance, 
without having had considerable experience 
in international diplomacy and statesman- 
ship. 

The voters, apparently, believed that 
a fellow who came from a country-ap- 
pointed cadetship to be a five star gen- 
eral — the equivalent of a field marshal — 
must have had plenty on the ball, con- 
sidering the organizational accomplish- 
ments, the military successes and the per- 
sonal leadership and all around ability 
needed to achieve such accomplishments. 

Those who now agree that Eisenhower 
was chosen because he was a military man 
substantiate that opinion by showing that 
he outran his party to what was a personal 
victory. 

The many who have had the privilege 
of serving in uniform, and that includes 



thousands from the University of Mary- 
land, well know that no class of men in 
the world hates wars as much as the 
"military men". They do not create the 
war. Their mission, rather, is expressed 
in Tennyson's "their's not to reason why, 
their's but to do or die." 

The men w T ho have died in battle for 
what is sometimes chronicled as "the 
glory" were more honest with the public 
they died for than the public had been 
with them. 

War is the outgrowth of a system that 
has plagued mankind since Cain slew Abel. 

Military men accept that fact for what 
it is. They squarely face that man has 
killed since the dawn of time, that it 
would be wonderful if all warfare ceased, 
but since man thus far has been born to 
warfare and with struggle his heritage, 
those who fight with the firmest courage 
and the most intelligence are those who 
allow their country and the loved ones 
in it to continue to live. 

Military men appreciate that there is a 
wisdom above war. It is called "peace". 
It is mankind's unknown adventure ! That 
peace is good for the world is accepted, 
but if proof of that belief lies in practice 
there is no record of it since the gates 
closed behind Adam and Eve in the Gar- 
den of Eden. 

In our society killing a man is a crime, 
homicide. When nations tackle the same 
business, wholesale, it is called war. When 
that starts, people wave flags, cheer, put 
the old shoulder to the wheel and all that 
sort of thing. It's been going on for a 
long, long time. Under our accepted moral 
order you can be hanged, shot, gassed or 
electrocuted for killing a man you know 
in a grudge fight. But you can also get 
•a medal and a citation, the thanks of a 
grateful nation, for killing 25 fellows you 
don't know ! 

Military men take mankind as it is. 
Their's is a personal honesty. Faced with 
the fact that people arc what they are 
and that either the enemy wins or we win, 
they fight the war as their country asks 
them to, doing the best job they know 
with the tools handed to them. In many 
cases that makes them heroes. That is 
why statues of soldiers dot the nation's 
landscape. 

To be good soldiers they must act. At 
home the non-military men may compro- 
mise and quibble. The soldier acts. He 
knows what the country wants done. He 
does it. Diplomats and statesmen some- 
times want success without the risk and 
attrition of gambling for it. Soldiers know 
that men give their lives to save the lives 
of others and, to do that, they must take 
yet other men's lives. 

It is a tough school but one steeped in 
fact and realism. Those who appreciate 
its lessons the most are those who at- 
tended it the longest. Well above the 
ken of the average civilian they abhor 
war. The more they see of it the more 
they hate it, 

For many, many years men in uniform, 
in our country and in others before our 
country came into being, have noted that 
the honor and the glory that comes to 
service folk had been limited to war time 
conditions. The shouting stopped when 
the shooting stopped. 



12 



An ancient English rhymster gave us, 
"Our God and sailor we adore, in times of 
trouble, not before. The trouble o'er both 
are alike requited, God is forgotten and 
the sailor slighted". 

Later Kipling penned his famous, "Tom- 
my this and Tommy that, and chuck 
him out, the brute! But it's a thin red 
line of 'eroes when the guns begins to 
shoot" and "it's. 'Tommy stand, aside!' 
but it's 'thank you, Mister Atkins.' when 
the troopship's on the tide". 

The recent election calls for a revision 
of the Kipling sentiment in this country. 
Of course service is still its own reward. 
In time of peace the regulars, the career 
men. plug along faithfully sans public 
adulation so that, if and when the drums 
roll again, the war time service man will 
ha\ i something to join. 

But the election of General Eisenhower 
proves conclusively that the public DOES 
remember a good soldier. 

Times without number, when things 
in Washington went against the grain of 
servicemen, one could garner the ex- 
pressed sentiment, "Maybe some day ex- 
service men will go to the Senate and 
Congress; maybe even to the White 
House". 

Well, this time they went all the way; 
President, Vice President, plus plenty in 
both houses of the Congress, some of them 
elected while they were still in uniform. 
On many an office door in Washington 
today, including the one at 1600 Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue, the World War II ex-GI's 
could write their message 




"... and Devereux" 

Referring to the foregoing editorial, 
appreciation of uniformed service is also 
reflected at the Maryland state level in 
the reelection of Representative James P. 
Devereux. Brigadier General, U. S. Marine 
Corps, retired. A Harford county com- 
ment, "Devereux was elected and re- 
elected on account of Wake Island." He 
represents the Second Maryland District, 
composed of Baltimore, Carroll and Har- 
ford Counties and parts of Baltimore City. 

It is fair to assume that a voter, familiar 
with the story of Wake and the long years 
that followed in a Japanese prison camp, 
might adduce that a fellow who could put 
up the battle Devereux delivered on Wake 
Island is a good man to have represent 
you in the Congress. 

How well do you remember Wake 
Island? It is well recalled by President 
Roosevelt's message to Congress on Jan- 
uary 6, '42, viz : — "There were only some 
four hundred United States Marines who, 
in the heroic and historic defense of Wake 
Island, inflicted such great losses on the 
enemy. Some of these men were killed in 
action and others are now prisoners of 



war. When the survivors of thai great 
fight are liberated and restored to their 
homes — they will learn that a hundred and 
thirty million of their fellow citizens have 
been inspired to render their own full 
share of sen ice and sacrifice." 

When the news of Wake Island flashed 
around the world representatives of the 
press converged upon General Tom Hol- 
comb, Commandant of Marines. They 
wanted a story. The General commented, 
"What did you expect? To have them 
take it lying down?" 

The General then pointed out that Wake 
constituted repetition of the "news" at 
Bladensburg in the war of 1812 when a 
Marine Battalion died across the line and 
retreated no more than did Devereux' 
outfit at Wake. 

Students of Maryland history know the 
Bladensburg story and. apparently, Mary- 
landers know and appreciate the Wake 
story. 

Overseas Athletes 

When Judge Saul Streit, of New York, 
leveled the attack of his main batteries 
of denunciatory criticism at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland's football roster, he based 
the attack upon the fact that Maryland 
fielded football players who hailed from 
beyond the Old Line's state borders, even 
though, as exhibit A, he cited the case of 
Lynn Beightol, a lad from Cumberland. 
Maryland. 

University authorities then pointed out 
that the prime purpose of a university is 
to educate its students and that, in one 
graduating class alone, Maryland issued 
diplomas to 99 students from overseas 
countries, not one of them an athlete. They 
came from as far away as Malaya. If you 
go any further than that you're coming 
back. 

Currently, under Coach Doyle Royal, 
Maryland is again fielding a very fine soc- 
cer team. Compared to the box office 
drawing power and public interest in 
American football, soccer, in this country 
is so much sugar for the birds. 

In South America and in Europe, as 
well as in the Far East, soccer draws the 
crowds. There it is the national sport. 
So if any great South American, European 
or Oriental soccer prospect wished to 
offer his athletic ability as a down pay- 
ment on a college education, it stands to 
reason that he'd certainly remain in a 
country where soccer is big stuff. It is, 
therefore, reasonable to adduce that when 
good soccer players from overseas choose 
to attend the University of Maryland 
they are attracted by educational advan- 
tages not at all connected with the field 
of sports. 

Coach Royal's '52 soccer squad includes 
nine players from overseas. They are Guido 
Alarcon and Eduardo Leon from Vene- 
zuela; Hector Salinas and Horacio Vivas 
from Nicaragua; Vladimir Eterovic and 
Hector Ormachea of Bolivia; Gustavo 
Orejuela and Edgar Ydkovo, of Colombia, 
and Jose Hagedorn of the Philippines. 

The matriculation of these nine athletes 
at College Park was not preceded by a 
race of coaches or scouts to any of the five 
countries mentioned. 




FOR FUN - FOR DECORATION 
FOR PROFIT! 
No Experience Necessary 
Results Guaranteed 
Men, women of all ages, even 
children, have taken to this fasci- 
nating hobby. Picture Craft's pre- 
mixed oil colors and numbered 
canvas guide your hand like a 
master painter's. You'll be amazed 
at the professional results, pleased 
with your new found ability. 

No Mix— No Mess— No Errors! 

Everything you need contained in 
the one compact package. Merely 
open the Picture Craft Kit and 
enjoy the pleasure of painting in 
oils the moment your brush 
strikes the canvas. It's that simple. 




Choose from 
21 Beautiful 
Artist-Designed 
Subjects 



$ 



ONLY 



2 



95 

per set 



Includes 

• Numbered Artist Canvas (16 x 12)* 

• Pre-mixed oil colors 

• Special artist's brush 

• Complete painting instrucnons 

* Larger size canvases (18 x 24) 
olso available at $6.95. 



<$&&»$ 



28 E. TWENTY-FIRST ST., BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



[13] 




Cut your travel costs — go Grey- 
hound! You'll always save going 
Greyhound — but do you know that 
you'll save an extra 10% or more 
each way when you buy a Grey- 
hound round-trip ticket! 



GREYHOUND 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION 

WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

MEtropolitan 8-1520 

1023 12th St., N.W. Washington 



J 


. NICHOLS 




— WHOLESALE- 




FANCY 




FRUITS & 




PRODUCE 




Lincoln 7-4888 


UNION MARKET TERMINAL 


1278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



Back to Maryland 

Under the above title the Washington 
Times-Herald printed an editorial recom- 
mending that the voteless District of Co- 
lumbia be returned to the State of Mary- 
land. 

Both political parties are pledged to 
"do something" about the District, the 
area for which was originally assigned to 
the Federal Government by Maryland and 
Virginia. However, when the Virginians 
found themselves suddenly voteless they 
requested return of their part of the Dis- 
trict to Virginia. Congress returned it. 

Referring to the failures of various at- 
tempts, down the corridor of years, to 
accord District residents something better 
than class B citizenship, the Times-Herald 
concludes, 

"The voteless District is now a tremen- 
dous body of population and a freak in 
contradiction to the American idea of gov- 
ernment, not to mention a pain in the neck 
to Congress. 

"It is obvious that 
promises which failed 
was small could have 
that we are large. 11 



none of the com- 
when the District 
more promise now 
is equally obvious 



that creating a 49th State of the District 
is impractical. 

"The right solution is to follow the 
precedent set in the case of the Virginians 
and cede the District back to Maryland. 
This can be done by simple acts of Con- 
gress and the Maryland legislature, in 
which the needs of the federal government 
can be fully protected, yet the citizenship 
of us taxed but unrepresented Americans, 
fully developed. 

"The reasons for the District's existence 
at the time of its establishment no longer 
hold good. The federal government is no 
timid unknown adventure in need of every 
possible shelter and protection. 

"On the contrary, it is already too power- 
ful, too central and too domineering for 
anybody's good, including its own. 

"Return the District to Maryland, and 
let this federal territory at last become a 
part of the United States of America." 



NEW OFFICES 

Sally Ladin Ogden. Advertising Direc- 
tor of "Maryland", announces the open- 
ing of new offices at 18 W. Twenty-fifth 
Street, Baltimore 18, Maryland. The tele- 
phone number is Hopkins 7294. 




Of Terps 

and 

Tigers 




PERSUADER 

'It's done wonders for class incentive." 

— The Jester 



Some years ago one of Maryland's 
former football coaches registered dis- 
approval of the terrapin as a mascot for 
Maryland athletic teams because the ter- 
rapin was insufficiently combative to serve 
as an emblem for competitive sports pur- 
poses. 

Other teams had lions, tigers, panthers, 
and eagles while we were stuck with that 
little E-flat feller, low to the ground and 
hiding between two slices of armor plate. 

Well, "a rose by any other name would 
smell as sweet," said the Bard of Avon 
years ago. and the terrapin is 0. K. six 
ways from the jack and eight across the 
board so long as the teams known as 
"Terrapins" take the measure of outfits 
represented by lions, tigers, goats, mules 
and what have you in your corral or zoo. 

The terrapin was rated as a rather smart 
little guy as far back as Aesop's fables. 
Some folks contend that the terp was a 
low down two-timer when he ran the bun- 
ny's legs off by the simple means of having 
a terp stationed at each end of the race 
course. When the hare arrived at the 
finish line the Xo. 2 terp was already 
there, not even breathing hard. Admirers 
of the sagacious little terrapin point to 
that strategy as a smart but simple com- 
mitment of organized reserves where and 
when they were most needed. 

Marylanders also like to recall that the 
terrapin is credited with having learned, 
long before Noah ordered leadsmen in 
both chains as the good ship Ark put out 
past Ararat Light, that one never gets 
into trouble until one sticks out his neck 
but that one never learns anything new 
until one does stick it out. 

The use of the names of animals goes 
I Kick to most anyone's kidhood, as wit- 
ness little Julius Schaukelpferd's essay in 
the primer class of Milwaukee's Evangel- 
isch-Lutherische Nazareth Gemeinde's Kir- 
chenschule, circa 1900. "Most animuls is 
quadroopeeds, or 4-leggers. They have 4 
legs. 1 on each foot. The elephunt is a 
4-legger but the kangaroon he is a 3- 
legger and romes the dessert like distant 
thunder, while the mice is a gnawist and 
an eatist of cheese. They is all kinds of 
animals and little boys like to play make- 
believe like they is them." 

Similarly Winnie the Poo and Alice m 
Wonderland gave us everything from Ee- 
yore and the Tiger to the door mouse 
and the March hare. 

As in many other premises concerning 
the history, traditions and expansion of 
the University, Dr. H. C. Byrd. the Uni- 
versity's president, had a great deal to do 
with the adoption of the terrapin as Mary- 
land's athletic mascot. Back in 1922 the 
diamondback terrapin, particularly in Dr. 
Byrd's home waters around Crisfield, was 
one of the State's most noted and delecta- 
ble products. When the student newspaper 
was seeking a new name, "Diamondback" 
was suggested by Dr. Byrd. 



14] 




Pres. E. C. Mayo 



Not long after this Maryland athletic 
teams began to be designated as "the Ter- 
rapins." In 1935 the yearbook changed its 
name from "The Reveille" to "The Terra- 
pin" by a vote of the student body. Thus, 
the name became even more identified 
with the university. 

The terrapin is por- 
trayed on campus in \ 
a hefty bronze statue. 
sometimes called 
"Testudo." the bronze 
for which was pro- 
vided and its creation 
made possible by E. 
C. Mayo, a Maryland 
graduate, president of 
the Gorham Manufac- 
turing Co.. of Provi- 
dence. R. I., who 
]. 1 a y e d quarterback 
for Maryland back in 
1903. Testudo was modeled after a live 
diamondback terrapin brought from Cris- 
field and sent to Providence. Tied to a 
light rope he unveiled his own statue at 
fitting ceremonies. 

Colonel Ralph I. Williams, president of 
ili, 1932-33 Student Government Associa- 
tion, conceived the 
^^^^ idea of the memorial; 

jf^k |^L Aristide B. Cianfaram. 

.4) Wk noted sculptor, and 

Robert J. Hill of the 
H bronze division of the 
.^tm . Vs Gorham Company, 
devoted particular at- 
tention to the details 
» in creating Testudo. 
j _* "t» A Major Howard Cut- 

^^-^^"^B ler. architect of the 
Bi^k A I Coliseum, gave his 
Col. R. 1. Williams services in designing 
the base. 
"Terrapin" is a word of Algonquin In- 
dian origin and refers to any of various 
North American turtles but especially the 
diamondback terrapin. The dictionary 
classifies these as in the "family Testu- 
dmae." hence the name "Testudo" for the 
big bronze Maryland terp. 

For headline brevity the press soon cut 
"Terrapins" to "Terps" and that is 100% 
for all the terp followers, just so the 
"Terps". true to "a rose by any other 
name" win the wins that win the head- 
lines. There is nothing quite so glorious 
as to see our teams victorious. In that 
premise the Terrapins have done a bit of 
alright for themselves in contests against 
tigers, goats, wolfhounds, bulldogs, et al, 
not to mention such departures from the 
animal kingdom as Tarheels, Blue Devils, 
Plainsmen. Spartans and others. 

On occasion the lowly terrapin has made 
ferocious tigers perform like your old 
Aunt Tilly's toothless pussy cat. Which 
recalls the story about a boxing show in 
London's Bow Bells district. The program 
consisted of matches involving kid cross- 
ing sweepers, mostly in sawed-off under- 
wear and bare feet. 

The shirt-sleeved and sweaty announcer, 
green eye shade and all. however, intro- 
duced these mauling mites under most 
voracious names. 

"In this cornah", he bawled, "weighing 
four-stone, The Liverpool Loy-Yun!" 



"And his opponent", the announcer con- 
tinued, "at four-stone, one, The North- 
umberland Tigali !" 

Whereupon Taff Womblev, signal yeo- 
man from H. M. S. "Unbendable" up in 
the pit. leaned over to his pal, Ginger 
Willoughby. Lance Corporal. R. M. L. I.. 
H. M. S. "Unpronounceable" with, "Loy- 
Yuns and Tigahs is it? Stroike me jolly 
well h'up a bloomin' plum tree if they 
don't look more loike a bloomin' pair of 
tom-cats!" 

And just so our terps make the "Loy- 
Yuns" and "Tigahs" look like tom-cats. 
The name "Terrapins" is good medicine 
for the inhabitants and alumni of Terp- 
town-on-t he-Paint -Branch. 

Footnote, (dipped in quinine): — We 
ir< r< writing about "animals", not "Plains- 
men" or Crimson "Tides". 




t*' 



THERE HE IS 



M CLUB DINNER 

The Second Annual M Club Dinner will 
be held Friday, January 30. at the Belve- 
dere in Baltimore. 

Sam Silber. Dinner Chairman, announces 
that arrangements have been made to ac- 
commodate 450. 

Social hour and cocktails will begin at 
6:00 P.M. Annual M Club Meeting at 
5:00 P.M. 

Dinner at 7:45, informal and stag. S7.50 
per plate, excluding cocktails. Mailing, 
printing, engraving, gifts, flowers and deco- 
ration, guests and principal speaker equal 
the cost of the dinner proper. The Com- 
mittee regrets the raise in price over hist 
year. 

Among those to be honored will be Mel- 
vin H. Baker. Chairman of the Board of 
National Gypsum Company, Charles P. 
McCormick, head of McCormick and Com- 
pany of Baltimore, Congressman James P. 
S. Devereaux of Wake Island fame, Neil 
H. Swanson of the Baltimore Sun and Dr. 
George Bennett nationally known surgeon. 
Art Gueppe, Head Football Coach of the 
University of Virginia, will be the princi- 
pal speaker. 

Deadline for M members to purchase 
tickets is set for December 31, 1952, after 
which tickets will go on sale to the public. 

Seating based on the first ordered — best 
s<at. Tables of ten are available. Remit 
when ordering tickets to: 
John E. Cordyack, Vice Ticket Chairman 
4317 Walther Boulevard 
Baltimore. 



Experts Agree . . . 

7<^ '*c t6e£i*te4ttH4de 



tSSJTAV 

Wquality«# 



BANDED FRANKFURTS 

Guaranteed pure and wholesome — 
selected beef and pork . . . sea- 
soned and spiced to tasty perfec- 
tion. Every Esskay Frankfurt is 
banded ior your protection. Buy by 
the brand on the band. 

At Your Dealers 

Always say ESSKAY 
WM. SCHLUDERBERG-T. J. KURDLE CO. 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 
Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LE. 2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
1822 Eye St., N.W. NA 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PESTS? 



-Call 7Ue 



TERMITES? 



Rode Mcut" 




SAratoga 6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



James Posey & Associates 

Consulting Engineers 

10 E. PLEASANT ST. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



15 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

* Esfablished 1859 * 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 
Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Frederick 1820-1821-2000 

Buckeystown 3511 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest and Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative. 

Feeds • Seeds • Fertilizer 

Limestone 

Petroleum Products 

Frederick 1 077-277- 11 77 

Thurmont 3111 

Middletown No. 6 

Main Office 

25 E. SOUTH STREET 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



T. EDGIE RUSSELL 



General Contractor 



FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
HOW. Patrick St. • Frederick, Md. 



PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 

Imposing New Structure Dedicated. Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, 

Director 




3^ 



NEW PSYCHIATRY BUILDING 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 




THE new Psychiatric Institute of the 
University of Maryland was dedicated 
in Baltimore on November 18, 1952. 

The $3,000,000 wing to the University 
Hospital is the new operating center of the 
department of psychiatry at the Univer- 
sity's medical school. 
Funds for the struc- 
ture were appropriated 
following considerable 
citizen protest con- 
cerning the state's 
mental institutions, 
and were in addition 
to the 825.000,000 ap- 
propriated by the Gen- 
eral Assembly to al- 
leviate conditions in 
the mental hospitals 
themselves. 

Dr. Finesinger M&yoJ . Thomas 

D'Alesandro, in according tribute to the 
University's president, Dr. H. C. Byrd, 
declared, "We all know the magnificent 
accomplishments of Dr. Byrd. He needs 
no praise from me. His work speaks for 
itself." 

Plans for Clinics 

Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, director of the 
institute, told the dedication audience, "I 
hope that in the years to come the efforts 
of those of us who are working here will 
be just as productive as were the efforts 
of those who formulated the ideas and 
plans which resulted in this imposing build- 
ing". 

The institute's plans call for the estab- 
lishment of clinics for the study and treat- 
ment of specialized types of mental illness 
or potential mental illness. These include 
services looking toward rehabilitation, a 
clinic for the study of the problems of 
alcoholics, and a clinic dealing with psy- 
chiatric disturbances which lead individu- 
als into courts. 



"We are planning." said Dr. Finesinger, 
"to work not only with other hospitals — 
especially those of the State Department 
of Mental Hygiene — but with other or- 
ganizations concerned with mental health." 

More than a score of visiting scientists 
and educators attended the opening pro- 
gram, among them three men of national 
distinction who received honorary degrees 
of doctor of science. 

They were Dr. John von Neumann, Hun- 
garian-born mathematician, now associated 
with the Institute for Advanced Study in 
Princeton, N. J. ; Dr. Ralph Waldo Gerard, 
now with the department of physiology, 
University of Chicago; and Dr. Stanley 
Cobb, neuropsychiatrist and editor of sev- 
eral scientific publications. 

Judge Cole Officiates 

The degrees were conferred by Judge 
William P. Cole. Jr.. chairman of the Uni- 
versity's Board of Regents and Associate 
Justice of the U. S. Court of Custom and 
Patent Appeals. 

The new six-story institute is connected 
to the University Hospital by a wing. Its 
three upper floors will be devoted to pa- 
tient care, the lower three to administra- 
tive offices, out-patient clinics, laboratories 
and classrooms. 

Provision has been made for the care 
of 102 patients within the institute, 18 of 
them children. 

Dedicatory ceremonies continued the 
following two days with panel discussions 
by eminent psychiatrists on "Factors In- 
fluencing Behavior," and "Learning Theory, 
Language, and the Problem of Personality 
Disorder." 

The first session heard Dr. Ralph W. 
Gerard, professor of neurophysiology and 
physiology at the University of Illinois 
discuss various approaches to research in 
a psychiatric institute. He described briefly 



16 



two experimental projects in Chicago. 
One of the projects related by Dr. Gerard 

dealt with the increased activity of the 
brain in relation to the break-down of 
energy-rich phosphate. The other, working 
with "memory traces." has turned up evi- 
dence that it takes time for a memory to 
sink in. 

In another session. Dr. Margaret Mead 
told her panel participants and audience 
that the hydrogen bomb is only a "new 
way" to kill ourselves. The well-known 
anthropologist declared, ''We keep walking 
around thinking we've thought up a way 
to kill each other. Man lias always had 
the capacity to kill himself," she added. 
"We're impressed (with the Hydrogen 
Bomb) because we're here." 

Distinguished Lectures 

Dr. Mead, whose anthropological studies 
have produced such works as "Male and 
Female." and "Soviet Attitudes Toward 
Authority. - ' told her audience that men 
in the past have also possessed the power 
to exterminate large sections of humanity. 

Other distinguished lecturers and panel- 
ists for the dedicatory sessions of the new 
Institute included Dr. Holger Hyden of 
Gothenburg. Sweden; Dr. J. H. Quastel 
of Montreal, Canada ; anil Dr. Raphael 
Lorente de No of the Rockefeller Institute 
for Medical Research in New York. 

An additional panel discussion was led 
by Dr. 0. Hobart Mowrer, research pro- 
fessor of psychology at the University of 
Illinois. He was joined in discussion by 
Dr. Stanley Cobb, Harvard Medical School, 
who is psychiatrist-in-chief of the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 



"Yearbooks, Please!" 

Several Maryland readers acted on a 
previous request for back copies of the 
yearbooks. Highly prized copies of the 
REVILLE for '97 and '98 came from Dr. 
H. B. McDonnell of the Class of 1888, 
long-time faculty member. Several from 
the early 1900's were donated by Joseph 
W. Kinghorne and several from the '30's 
by Arthur B. Hamilton. We now have 
duplicates for about a third of the issues. 
Karl B. Frazier '27 is very anxious for a 
yearbook from his class. There are others 
who would like copies also. Most impor- 
tant is the fact that a duplicate set is 
needed in the event the one complete set 
now in the alumni office might be com- 
pletely destroyed in some unforeseen man- 
ner. Take an extra look around the house 
and let us know if you find one or more 
REVILLE's or TERRAPINS you would 
be willing to give up for the alumni files. 



DANZER 

METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE 1818 



^ flmfio Emm 




"A secure future, exceptional opportunities for advancement, 
and a high starting salary await you at Fairchild, if you are 
one of the men we are looking for. We have openings right 
now for qualified engineers and designers in all phases of 
aircraft manufacturing; we need top-notch men to help us in 
our long-range military program: turning out the famous 
C-119 for the U.S. Air Forces. 

"Fairchild provides paid vacations and liberal health and 
life insurance coverage. We work a 5-day, 40-hour week. 

"If you feel you are one of the men we are looking for, 
write me. Your inquiry will be held in strictest confidence, 
of course." 




*W alter Tydon, widely known aviation engineer and aircraft designer 
and veteran of 25 years in aviation, is Chief Engineer of Fairchild' s 
Aircraft Division. 



tm ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION 

Fairchild 




7^1/umA Dwdim 



HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



Cooperating with the 

Agriculture Department 



of the 



University of Maryland 



FOUR STATES LIVESTOCK, INC. 

Hagerstown, Maryland 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone FREDERICK 1034 
FREDERICK, MD. 



EBERT'S 

Famous 
ICE CREAM 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



17 



Communion Service 

in University Chapel 

designed by 

Henry Powell Hopkins, Jr. 

STUDIO 

Henry Powell Hopkins, Jr. 

hand wrought jewelry 

silver remodeling 

repairing 

1111 Lovegrove Alley 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

Plaza 6196 



• • 




• • 

Phone LExington 7055 



H0PW00D 
Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

BALTIMORE • WASHINGTON 
ALEXANDRIA 

Towson & Beoson Streets 

PL. 0433 BALTIMORE 



Pictures Framed 

We specialize in framing Diplomas 
inexpensively 

DOELLER & DRAISEY 

1218 Northview Rd., Baltimore 
By appointment — HOpkins 3792 




WBAL VIDEO HONORED 

Leslie H. Peard, Jr., manager of stations WBAL and WBAL-TV, presents a citation honoring 
D. L. Provost, vice president and general manager of radio and television for the Hearst Corporation, 
in recognition of his efforts in behalf of education. Left to right are Messrs. Talbot Speer, Past 
president of the University of Maryland Alumni Association, presenting the citation; Charles 
Sylvester, president of the Association's Baltimore Chapter; Mr. Peard and Mrs. Peard. 

Mr. Provost was lauded for his assistance and foresight in the presentation of the weekly University 
of Maryland TV show, presented on Tuesday nights over WBAL-TV. which has become the highest- 
rated public service non-sponsored broadcast in Baltimore. 

In accepting Mr. Provost said, "An effective public affairs broadcasting program is the backbone 
of any radio or television station operation. In no other way can a station become as close 
to its community as it must to be successful." 



UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 

ALUMNI CLUBS 



Year of Progress 

A YEAR of exceptional activity on the 
part of the Alumni Clubs Committee 
and members of the General Alumni Coun- 
cil under the Chairmanship of Vice-Presi- 
dent Sarah E. Morris of New York, re- 
sulted in the formation of six new and ac- 
tive Alumni Clubs. In the order of estab- 
lishment, they are, Schenectady, New York. 
The New England Club, Eastern Shore. 
Richmond. Va., Prince Georges County, 
and Carroll County. This group joins New 
York. Pittsburgh. Baltimore, and Alle- 
gany County. Contemplated are clubs 
in Washington. Frederick, Anne Arundel, 
and Queen Anne Counties. Special appre- 
ciation for assistance in formation of these 
new Clubs goes to Col. O. H. Saunders '10, 
Abram Z. Gottwals '38 and Dr. William H. 
Triplet t '11. 

Schenectady Club 

Janice Mackey, Corresponding Secretary, 
sends a summary of Club activities for the 
Northern New York alumni group. 

The spring meeting was a business ses- 



sioD for developing a constitution and a 
program of activities. There followed a 
bang-up family picnic in July. 

In October the annual meeting was held 
at the home of Marie and Bob Esher. 
Permanent officers wore elected and in- 
clude Mrs. Marie Esher as President, 
Howard Faucett as Vice-President, Mrs. 
Jean English as Recording Secretary and 
Treasurer, and Mrs. Janice Mackey as the 
Corresponding Secretary. The President 
appointed the following committee chair- 
men : Charles Morrell as Program Chair- 
man, Charlie Hobbs as Membership and 
Hospitality Chairman, and Sid Kaplan as 
University Relations & Publicity Chair- 
man. 

After the business meeting, a social 
hour followed. Members present were 
Marie and Bob Esher. Ruth and Howard 
Faucett, Janice Mackey. Jean and Gordon 
English, Bob Bunnecke. Barbara and 
Charles Morrell and Charles Hobbs. 

The Eshers represented the Club at the 
Xew England Homecoming week-end in 
Boston on October 31 and November 1. 

Richmond Club 

The Richmond Alumni Club's newly 
elected Chairman is Paul E. Mullinix '36 
Ag. and the Secretary Gerard J. Martin 
'42 A&S. On the Board are Taylor P. 
Rowe '24 Ag., Robert Condon '42 BPA, 
Oakley Roach '43 BPA, John W. Savage 
'32 A&S, Mrs. S. T. Kummer '40 Ed„ and 
Bettv Beeks '45 Home Economics. 



is; 



Tins new Virginia Club had its -start 
in the John Marshal] last May when fif- 
teen gathered to set the stage for the fall 
meeting. Initially the Club plans to de- 
velop interest through several social func- 
tions and will later establish an appropriate 
I 'inject. A complete check has been made 
of the mailing list for contact purposes 
and lias been forwarded to the Alumni 
Office at College Park to assist that office 
in keeping records and addresses up to 
date. 

Carroll County 

Another Alumni Club is under way. At 
a meeting on Nov. 24. attended by exactly 
50. Sherman E. Flanigan. A&S '24, West- 
minster, was elected President of the group. 
Mr. Flanigan is also president of the Ro- 
tary Club and is active in the Chamber of 
Commerce ami the Masons. He was a 
member of the Maryland House of Dele- 
gates from 1931 to 1935 and was police 
magistrate from 1935 to 1939. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Education from 
George Washington University in 1936. 

Other officers elected were Dr. T. H. 
Legg, '07 Med.. Union Bridge. Vice-Presi- 
de in ; Carol Remsberg Bare. '42 H. Ec, 
Manchester, Secretary; Myra F. Wolf, 
'32 Edu.. RFD. Westminster. Treasurer; 
and the Board of Directors included 
Thomas E. Shilling '50 Agr., Hempstead ; 
Dr. L. L. Leggctt '30 Dental. Mount Airy; 
R. Kenneth Barnes, Jr. '40 Edu.. of Sykes- 
ville; Ralph W. Baumgardner '40 Edu., 
Westminster; and L. C. Burns '23 Agr., 
Westminster. 

The new club placed responsibility for 
developing a constitution and future pro- 
grams and activities on the Officers and 
Board. Organizational steps followed a 
talk by Dr. H. C. Byrd on the University 
of Maryland in which he pointed to an 
enrollment ranging from 36 to 40.000 stu- 
dents. He reviewed the scope of Research 
m all fields by University Departments 
and pointed to future building plans in- 
cluding a Physical Education Building 
and Student Union at College Park as 
well as a Nurses Home in Baltimore. He 
stated the Math Building, now under con- 
struction, would join the Chemistry and 
Physics buildings in an Institute of Tech- 
nology. He further placed great emphasis 
on Campus religious life through the fa- 
cilities of the new Chapel. 

Verne Siebert of the University Athletic 
Staff showed movies of the Sugar Bowl 
mime. The next meeting is to be a trip 
to College Park for a boxing match. 

Princes Georges Host 

Fifty Alumni of Prince Georges County 
traveled through one of the worst fogs of 
the year to assemble on November 15 in 
the Student Recreation center and elect 
Egbert Tingley '27 President of the newly 
formed Organization. Mr. Tingley is Post 
Master at Hyattsville and a former mem- 
ber of the State Legislature. He has also 
served on the BPA Alumni Board, the 
general Alumni Council and is editor for 
the BPA section of MARYLAND. 

Other officers elected were William Kah- 
ler '48, Vice-Pres. Bladensburg; Mrs. Bar- 
bara Brown '49, Secretary, Berwin Heights; 
and Frank Claggett '52 Upper Marlboro, 
Treasurer. Names of the Board of Direc- 
tors are Ann Fennessev '47. Universitv 



Even A Baby Knows — 

KOONTZ 

DAIRY 

PRODUCTS 




Are Really 

• EXTRA RICH 

• EXTRA NOURISHING 

• EXTRA DELICIOUS 



KOONTZ 




GOLDEN 
GUERNSEY MILK 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

KENNERSLEY FARM DAIRY 

ON THE EASTERN SHORE OF MARYLAND 



Reach for-- 




C. C. OLIPHANT & SON, INC. 

ESTABLISHED 1921 

Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors 

Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 
"Barrett" - Bonded Roofers - "Carey" 

Telephones: Day 555 - Night 3789 LAUREL, DELAWARE 



i°: 



(l5artlett 

Waterfront and Inland 

Farms and Estates 

Office Phone 1 18 - Residence 1784 

TIDEWATER INN 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



Berlin 

Milling 

Company 

Incorporated 1909 

Berlin's Best Feeds 

BERLIN, MARYLAND 




concrete 
products co. 

CINDER • SLAG • LINTELS 
CONCRETE BLOCKS 

ce ntervil le, m d . 



The Eley 
Construction Co. 

CONTRACTORS 
& BUILDERS 

"We Build and Finance 
Homes" 

OFFICE— HILLSBORO 3211 
NITE PHONE— 3212 

QUEEN ANNE, MARYLAND 





ANNE HOLLAND CITED 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, past president of the 
Baltimore Chapter of the University of Mary- 
land Alumni Association, presents a citation to 
Mrs. Anne Holland, Director of Women's Activ- 
ities for the WBAL-TV Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, for her "extraordinary, valuable and 
meritorious contribution to public service in the 
field of visual education." The presentation was 
made at the Baltimore Chapter's first fail 
dinner meeting. 



Park; Freda Starobin '52. Chillum : L. G. 
Scasser, Jr. '52, Upper Marlboro; Ernest 
Cory '47, Laural; A. Cagiano '51, River- 
dale. 

The organizational meeting followed a 
preliminary session at the home of Harry 
Boswell, Jr. '42 in September. At this 
time a steering committee was named to 
draft a constitution and to make nomina- 
tions for officers. Members of this com- 
mittee, in addition to some of those elected 
officers of the club were Marvin M. Hall, 
Jr., Paul Strickler, Jr., Gale Brown, S. C. 
Ward, George H. Keyser, John H. Hast, 
Julian A. Bartolini, Raymond L. Worth- 
ington. 

Those in attendance enjoyed coffee, ci- 
der and ginger bread served under the 
supervision of alumnus William L. Hoff 
who supervises the Recreation Center. 
The Club will serve as the host group for 
alumni activities at the University. 

Baltimore Club 

The Alumni Club of Baltimore opened 
the '52-'53 season with a dinner-meeting 
at the Sheraton Belvedere Hotel on Oc- 
tober 29th. Dale Carnegie, noted author 
and lecturer, was the guest speaker and a 
record attendance enjoyed one of the 
Club's most successful meetings. The Rev. 
Gottlieb Siegenthaler, Pastor of St. Mat- 
thew's Evangelical and Reformed Church, 
delivered the Invocation. 

An outstanding feature of the evening 
was the presentation of scrolls to Anne 
Holland. Director of Women's Activities 
& Public Affairs— WBAL & WBAL-TV; 
and D. L. Provost, Vice-President and 
General Manager of Hearst Radio In- 
corporated, for their meritorious efforts in 
behalf of the University of Maryland in 
the field of visual education and public 
service. The program, "Live and Help 
Live", during the past eighteen months 
with Anne Holland as its Producer and 
Moderator has become the most widely 
viewed scientific program in Baltimore. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of the Uni- 
versity; Judge William P. Cole, Jr.. Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents; Talbot T. 



Speer. President of the Alumni Council; 
Milton Patterson and Herbert Brown, 
members of the Board of Regents; Gov- 
ernor Theodore R. McKeldin; Mayor 
Thomas D'Alesandro; Paul L. Holland, 
Director of Public Works for Baltimore 
City; Mr. & Mrs. Leslie Peard ; and Mr. 
& Mis. George Buck were among the dis- 
tinguished guests. 

Much of the success of the meeting was 
due to the combined efforts of the com- 
mittees in charge, under the leadership of 
Dr. John C. Krantz '28 Medicine, Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee. Assist- 
ing the Chairman were William J. Huck- 
soll. Dr. Noel Foss, Mrs. Bessie Araurius 
'20 Nurs., James Stevens '19 Ag., Chester 
Tawney '31 BPA, Mrs. W. G. McKenney 
'36 H.Ec. Mason C. Albrittain '23 Engr., 
Dr. Sam Silber '29 Dental, John R. Mit- 
chell '33 Ed., Abraham Krieger '25 Law, 
Mrs. Margaret W. Webster '39 Nursing, 
Ralph Clark '38 A&S, Miss Laura Vogeler 
'50 A&S, Dr. Arthur I. Bell '19 Dental, 
Mrs. Ruth Ohlendorf. Arthur Van Reuth 
'34 Engr.. Mrs. Chester Tawney '44 H.Ec, 
David Bien '29 Law, Dr. John Lutz 14 
Medical. Mrs. David Bien '22 Nursing, Dr. 
W. S. McGinnis. Beatrice Jarrett '34 Ag., 
Dr. George A. Bawden '16 Medical, John 
B. Conway '31 Law, Jesse J. Krajovic '32 
A&S, Sally L. Ogden, Mrs. John Savage 
'30 Ed.. Karl F. Steinmann '20 Law and 
Gretchen Van Slyke Welsh. 

The newly elected officers of the Club 
are Charles W. Sylvester '08 Engineering, 
President; Dr. John C. Krantz '28 Medi- 
cine. 1st Vice-President ; Dr. Arthur I. 
Bell, '18 Dental, 2nd Vice-President; Dr. 
William Triplett '11 Medicine, 3rd Vice- 
President ; and James O. Proctor '39 Edu- 
cat ion, Secretary-Treasurer. 

January Jamboree 

The "January Jamboree" of the Alumni 
Club of Baltimore promises to be an in- 
formal evening of Fun-Frolic-and-Food 
when new members of the Club are to be 
welcomed and entertained. The date is 
Friday evening. January 23, and the 
place is the Recreation Auditorium of the 
New Psychiatric Building. The evening's 
entertainment will feature many novel 
ads by performers representing the vari- 
ous Schools, and the "Mix-Master" of the 
,l av — the well-known Gil Monroe with 
his Orchestra — will "mix-it-up" in gay 
fashion. Graduates and friends of the 
University are invited to join in this get- 
acquainted atmosphere of good fellowship. 

Dr. Arthur I. Bell, the General Chair- 
man, is being assisted by Dr. Albert E. 
Goldstein (Entertainment) ; James 0. Proc- 
tor (Reservations) ; Mrs. Thomas C. Web- 
ster (Arrangements) ; Mrs. Ruth Ohlen- 
dorf (Decorations); Beatrice Jarrett and 
Sally Ogden (Publicity and Promotion). 



AAUP Meeting 

The Maryland Chapter of the American 
Association of University Professors met 
in the Maryland Room, College Park. 

Special guest speaker at the meeting 
was Dr. Ralph E. Himstead, General Sec- 
retary of the AAUP and Editor of the 
A.-sociation's Bulletin. His talk, "The 
Proposition is Professional" was concerned 
with the work of the organization and its 
position in universities today. 



20 



College of • 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest '38 



Bud Fort Busy 

ALFRED M. ("BUD") FORT. JR., 
(A&S '51) wound up a successful base- 
ball season with the Class B Asheville 
Tourists of the Tri-State League. He is 
expected to don the uniform of Blanton's 
in the Western Carolina Semi-Pro League 
in basketball. 

At present, besides his duties as a sales 
representative for a major oil company, 
Fort is writing, directing, producing, and 
narrating one of the most popular radio 
shows in Western North Carolina. 

In Louisville 
Harvey F. Connick '33 is in Louisville, 
Kentucky, after leaving Carney's Point, 
New Jersey. He is with the E. I. DuPont 

deXemours Company and recently has 
been transferred from the Chambers Works 
to the Neoprene plant in Louisville. 

From Vienno 

An exhibition of the work of Ernest 
Lothar, Viennese painter now residing in 
Baltimore, was held at the University. 

Mr. Lothar has studied at the Academy 
of Fine and Allied Arts in Vienna, has 
worked under the Swiss artist Hans Aesch- 
bacher, and has been Professor of Painting 
at the School of Fine Arts, University of 
Santo Domingo. Ciudad Tru.jillo, Domini- 
can Republic. Since 1947, he has taught at 
the Hampton Institute, Virginia, the Work- 
shop Center of the Arts and the National 
Ait School, both in Washington, D. C. and 
at the Department of Recreation in Arling- 
ton, Virginia. 

Mr. Lothar has had one man shows 
throughout the country including the 
George Binet Gallery and the Bodley 
Gallery in New York, the University of 
Maine, and the Francis Taylor Galleries in 
Los Angeles. He has been represented in 
such group shows as the 55th Chicago 
Annual, the Corcoran Annuals for 1951 
and 1952, the American University Spring 
Show in 1951, and the Phillips Gallery, 
March, 1952. 

Moril Exhibit 

A small retrospective exhibition of the 
paintings of Herman Maril, assistant pro- 
fessor of art at the University of Mary- 
land, took place at the Playhouse, Balti- 
more. The show of paintings, both in the 
oil and gouache media, offered examples 
of the artist's work from 1932 to the pres- 
ent, most of which was on loan from mu- 
seum and private collections. 

Herman Maril's work is represented in 
the New York Metropolitan Museum, the 
Baltimore Museum, Phillips Memorial Gal- 
lery. American University, the Encyclo- 
pedia Britannica Collection of Contempo- 
rary Art, the Cone Collection, Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute, and other collec- 
tions throughout this country and abroad. 
Art galleries in New York. Philadelphia, 
{Concluded on page 64) 



L^uruei thrall \^utien 



v 




THE PERFECT GIFT' 



AVAILABLE IN 
AN ASSORTMENT 
OF 72 SETS 
FROM $8.50 
TO $134.50 




, FtNE CUTLERY, 
by Briddell, 

Sold By Leading Stores 
Throughout The Country 



MADE BY BRIDDELL of CRISFIELD, MO. 

President, Chas. D. Briddell, Class of 1935 



Seed Cleaning 

Clover Seed 
Fertilizer • Lime 



HORACE M. MORGAN 

Queen Anne, Maryland 



Call us to purchase your 
Red Clover 

Phone- Hillsboro 3 89 1 



FAMOUS For "Ready-to-Cook" FROZEN SEAFOOD 

h m ■ ■■ Also Try Our Fresh Picked Crab Meat, Oysters, Canned 

ft E> hiii7/^S1 Fish Products, Tomatoes, and Whole Kernel Golden Corn. 




T&^jmeKING CO 






Concrete Septic Tanks 

EVERLASTING 

G. E. GILLESPIE & SON 

SUDLERSVILLE, MD. 



When patronizing advertisers please mention "Maryland" 



[21] 




The Winners, Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority. Officers of the sorority 
are as follows: second row, left to right — Faga Oshry, Treasurer; third 
from left — Dorothy Schaech, Vice-President; Joan Zulty, President; third 
row, second from left — Irene Hilinski, Secretary; third from left — Rosalie 



WINNERS AND RUNNERS-UP 

Greenberg. Corresponding Secretary. 



Winners of second prize — Iota Chapter, Phi Delta Chi. are shown at 
the right. 




OLD GRADS AT FROLIC 

L. to r. Dr. Otto W. Muehlhause, Class of 
1913, Ferdinand Ulman, Class of 1897, Judson 
H. Sencindiver, Class of 1897. 



School of 



Pharmacy 



B. Olive Cole 



Sixth Annual Frolic 

MORE than five hundred persons — 
alumni. teachers, students and 
friends, attended the Sixth Annual Frolic 
sponsored by the Alumni Association of 
the School of Pharmacy at Cadoa Hall, 
Baltimore. 

The fraternities, sorority and various 
talented students participated in the com- 
petitive performances offered as the en- 
tertainment of the evening. Three fra- 
ternities — Iota Chapter, Phi Delta Chi; 
Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity; 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega; The 
Epsilon Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma 
Sorority ; The Newman Club ; A harmoni- 
ous trio — Two Pills and a Capsule; and 
two individuals competed for the coveted 
Bernard Cherry Activity Cup offered by 
him six years ago and for the prize money 
amounting to $75.00. 

The Epsilon Chapter of the Lambda 
Kappa Sigma Sorority presented a spe- 
cialty dance and two comedy skits and 
received the first prize of $25.00. The Cherry 
Cup was retired in their possession, as 
they had on two previous occasions been 
successful in receiving the first prize. The 
second prize of $15.00 was won by the 
Iota Chapter of the Phi Delta Chi Fra- 



ternity. The other fraternities and con- 
testants received varying amounts rang- 
ing from $10.00 to $3.00. Mr. Bernard 
Cherry has offered the second cup for 
further competitive performances of the 
fraternities, etc. during the coming years. 
President Samuel I. Raichlen welcomed 
the large audience, Mr. Alexander J. Og- 
rinz, First Vice-President, presented the 
performers, and Dean Noel E. Foss handed 
the prizes to the representative of the 




FROM KAPPA CHAPTER 

At a dinner meeting of the Kappa Chapter of 
the Alpha Zeta Omega Pharmaceutical Frater- 
nity, Mrs. Barry Levin, President of the Ladies 
Auxiliary of the Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta 
Omega Fraternity, presented the School of Phar- 
macy of the University of Maryland with a 
check for $350.00 for the purpose of purchasing 
photographic equipment to be used by the 
School. This donation will be of value in en- 
larging the program of the School in visual 
education. Left to right above: — Mrs. Levin, 
Dean Noel E. Foss and Samuel S. Robbins, 
Directorum of the Kappa Chapter. 



successful group or person. The judges of 
the competitive performances were Mrs. 
Mervin G. Pierpont, Mr. Bernard Ulman, 
Sr., and Mr. Thomas J. Kelly. 

Refreshments were served and popular 
songs and dancing continued until 1 a.m. 
Many commendations were received by 
the officers and committees of the Alumni 
Association on the success of the affair. 
It was an enjoyable occasion which en- 
gendered hilarity, friendship and good 
fellowship. 

The annual entertainment and dance of 



the Alumni Association will be held on 
Thursday, February 12. 1953 at the Emer- 
son Hotel, Baltimore, Md. 

"Miss Personality" 

Miss Dorothy Schaech. senior in the 
School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land was voted '-MISS PERSONALITY" 
at the Convention of the Lambda Kappa 
Sigma National Pharmaceutical Sorority 
held in Hollywood, California, in August 
1952. Miss Schaech is Vice-President of 
the Epsilon Chapter of the Lambda Kappa 
Sigma Sorority, School of Pharmacy, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Miss Schaech is an 
all-around girl with lots of personality, very 
versatile and very active. She was the 
leading spirit in the presentation of the 
skit of the Sorority at the Sixth Annual 
Frolic of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy on November 6. 1952. 

Founders' Day 

Founders' Day Observance of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association, (1852), 
was celebrated at the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland on October 
7, 1952. by the Baltimore Branch and the 
Student Branch of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

Dr. Otto W. Muehlhause. President of 
the Baltimore Branch, presided. Mr. Bur- 
ton Goldstein, President of the Student 
Branch, gave a resume of the formation 
and aims of the student group, which group 
now has approximately 125 members. Mr. 
William J. Lowry, Jr.. who has been 
closely associated with the Baltimore 
Branch since its formation, gave a resume 
of the history of that group. 




FROLIC JUDGES 

Judges of competitive performances at the 
Frolic — 1. to r. Mrs. Mervin G. Pierpont, Mr. 
Bernard Ulman and Mr. Thomas J. Kelly. 



[22] 



IN "TILE AND TILL" 

"Tile and Till", publication of Eli Lilly 
and Company, recently featured an ex- 
cellently written article on the University 
of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

The article, penned by Dr. B. Olive Cole, 
elicited much favorable comment from 
readers. 



The program, originating in Washington 
and transmitted by wire to some sixty 
points scattered over the country from 
coast to coast and from north to south, 
was plainly heard and enjoyed by the 
group assembled for that purpose. 

The program included greetings from 
President K. Q. Richards; addresses by 
Rear Admiral H. L. Pugh. Surgeon Gen- 
eral U. S. Navy, who substituted for Dr. 
Melvin A. Casbcrg. Chairman. Armed 
Forces Medical Policy Council, on "Na- 
tional Defense and the Health Profes- 
sions"; by Dr. Theodore G. Klumpp, Pres- 
ident of Winthrop-St earns. Inc., on "Pri- 
vate Industry and the Professions Can 
Meet the Challenge"; and by Dr. Roberl 
P. Fischelis, "The American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association — Its Place and Program in 
the Healing Arts." 

Following the informal meeting of the 
Branches and the program emanating from 
Washington, refreshments were served in 
an upper room, at which time a birthday 
cake lighted with one hundred candles was 
served. The candles were extinguished by 
two members who have been active in the 
work of the Baltimore Branch for many 




PARTY CAKE 

Founders' Day Observance of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association as celebrated at 
the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland 
Mr. Wm. J. Lowry. Jr. and Miss B. Olive 
Cole, extinguishing one hundred candles from 
birthday cake. 



years — Mr. William J. Lowry. Jr.. and Miss 
B. Olive Cole. 

The celebration of Founders' Day in 
Baltimore by the two branches of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, as 
well as sixty or more such celebrations in 
other cities, and the unusual method of 
sending the program from Washington. 
provided the groups with an enjoyment 
which the strongest imagination of the 
founding fathers would not have visual- 
ized. 




FOUNDERS' DAY 

Founders' Day Observance of the American Pharmaceutical Association as celebrated at the School 
of Pharmacy, University of Maryland 
Left to right — Dr. Frank Slama, Faculty Advisor of the University of Maryland Student Branch 
of the A. Ph. A.; Mr. Burton J. Goldstein, President of the Student Branch; Dr. Otto W. Muehl- 
hause, President, Baltimore Branch, A. Ph. A.; Dr. Benjamin F. Allen, Secretary, Baltimore Branch, 
A. Ph. A. 




Paul W. Phillips 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 



SUDLERSVILLE 
MARYLAND 



East Coast 
Marketers Inc. 

Exclusive Sales Agents 

for 

SHORELAND FREEZERS, INC. 

TRAPPE FROZEN FOODS CORP. 

FROZEN FOODS 
P. O. Box 566 Salisbury, Md. 



Paul V. Downing 

PAVING CONTRACTOR 

Asphalt • Concrete 

Estimates Furnished 
upon request 

Phone 7590 
SALISBURY, MD. 



pen 
(food 'pood 

Follow the Crowd to 

JOHNNYS and SAMMYS 

SALISBURY, MD, 



23 




MELFIELD 

Melfield, located near Queenstown provides 
an excellent presentation of early Maryland 
architecture. 

By Beatrice Young Jarrett 

//l iV Lord's Gift" the epitome of Cava- 
l\f\ licr elegance was to be our first 
stop on our visit to four historic homes in 
Queen Annes County. We drove down 
the beautiful avenue of trees and around 
the Boxwood circle to the main entrance. 
where we were greeted by "the lady of 
the manor", the charming Mrs. Thomas 
Marsalis, our hostess, who was to accom- 
pany us on our tour. 

Situated on the banks of the Chester 
River, outside of Queenstown, "My Lord's 
Gift", granted in 1658 by Caecilius Calvert, 
Second Lord Baltimore, to Henry de 
Coursy for having effected a certain treaty 
with the Susquehanna Indians, comprised 
as much land shown on a particular map. 
as he could cover with his thumb. (Legend 
has it that de Coursy rolled this thumb 
to a much larger expanse than the actual 
thumb print would have made on the 
map.) This tract is also known as "The 
Thumb Grant". 

Priceless Antiques 

Upon entering the center hall of the 
mansion, our attention was immediately 
drawn to the vista across the well-trim- 
med turf . . . once the site of colonial 
tournaments ... to the tranquil river. 
When the present house was being con- 
structed in 1928, Mr. & Mrs. Marsalis took 
great care to include paneling and wood- 
work from the original house. Many price- 
loss antiques have found a perfect setting 
in this structure. 

Our walk in the gardens took us across 
a box-lined terrace, down past the swim- 
ming pool (reflecting the chimney in its 



HISTORIC MARYLAND MANORS 

Outstanding Examples of Early Colonial Architecture, Due to 

Painstaking Efforts of Owners, Perpetuate the Classic Dignity 

and Elegance Instituted by Original Designers 



depth), through a pergola covered with 
intertwined Wisteria and Flax vines and 
on through a long Mimosa walk to the en- 
chanting Spring and Bog gardens. The 
rocks in this woodland setting once served 
as ballast on the early sailing vessels. 

It was a great effort to tear ourselves 
away from such a completely satisfying 
atmosphere. "My Lord's Gift", so called 
because of Lord Baltimore's gift might 
well have been "The Lord's Gift" signify- 
ing God's fulfillment of the Colonial Set- 
tlers' dreams. 

"Melfield" 

"Melfield", near Queenstown, was the 
second of the homes we were to visit dur- 
ing the day, built in 1784 as a wedding 
gift to Mary Earle, who married a Tilgh- 
man, this colonial structure retains many 
of its original doors, mantles, and floors. 
It is truly authentic early Maryland archi- 
tecture of simple beauty. Mr. & Mrs. 
Oliver C. Jones, present owners, restored 
and rebuilt "Melfield". 

"Kennersley" 

At "Kennersley" we were welcomed by 
the new owners of this magnificent estate, 
Mr. & Mrs. John L. Milne, of Marlton, 
N. J. 

Situated midway between Chestertown 
and Centreville, "Kennersley" was re- 
cently restored in exquisite taste by Mr. 
& Mrs. Eugene Callis, who exercised great 
care to preserve the lovely mantles, large 
fireplaces and cornices which impart a 
grave dignity. The old lines, floors and 
woodwork remain unchanged so that "Ken- 
nersley" appears today as it did in 1703 
when it was built by Richard Jones, in the 
finest Maryland tradition. 

The manor house is conservatively with- 
drawn from the water and commands an 
extensive view of rolling country. 

"The Venture" 

The Bryan house in Bryantown and 



Perry's Corner, "The Venture", long a 
forgotten dilapidated structure caught 
the fancy and attention of Mr. William 
Willis, a Marylander endowed with a 
sincere appreciation of Colonial architec- 
ture, who purchased the structure. 

During the 23-mile journey to its pres- 
ent site on the Corsica River, outside of 
Centreville (while the house was being 
moved intact) shingles were accidentally 
removed that revealed the unusual beaded 
clapboard that covered the house — this 
today makes it most outstanding. 

The rare beauty of the mantle and 
woodwork, long hidden under layers of 
heavy paint, was uncovered by Mr. & Mrs. 
Willis after many hours of painstaking 
effort. Mrs. Willis told us that she alone 
spent 100-hours restoring the mantle which, 
together with the corner cupboard, is a 
very fine example of early Americana. 

All too quickly the day had gone and 
we were reluctant to leave our hostess in 
this peaceful atmosphere to get back to 
the hustle and bustle of the City. But, 
Mrs. Marsalis, with true Southern hospital- 
ity, extended an invitation to continue this 
tour of Eastern Shore treasures. We were 
delighted to accept. 

ALUMNI CALENDAR 

IT'S here! The new 1953 Alumni Cal- 
endar with more than 30 scenes from 
the University campus in both Balti- 
more and College Park is waiting for 
you. The price to Alumni actively sup- 
porting the Association through a sub- 
scription to Maryland is $1.00 per copy. 
The general sale price is $1.25. Here 
is a constant reminder of both the Uni- 
versity and the Alumni Association which 
will be of real use in both the home and 
the office. Use the coupon below to 
order the copy or copies you desire for 
yourself and your friends. The price to 
you is $1.00. 




KENNERSLEY 

A magnificent early colonial estate situated between Centerville and 
Chestertown in historic Queene Anne County. 



MY LORD'S GIFT 

At Queenstown on the Chester River this historic estate is a classic 
example of colonial architectural elegance. 



24 



I 



College of :-^^^=^==^= 

Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 

Health Education at the 
University of Maryland 

=^^^ Mrs. Marguerite Key, M.P.II. 



HYGIENE Classes have changed! And 
so has the preparation of teachers in 
health education. 

Teaching of health has undergone many 
changes in the last several years. The 
hygiene class in which students memo- 
rized the names of bones and studied the 
symptoms of Beriberi have changed to 
classes which deal with realistic health 
problems and solutions which involve not 
merely knowledge alone, but attitudes 
and practices as well. Health teachers 
realize the great gap between "what we 
know about health" and "what we do 
about health." The activities of today's 
hygiene classes are aimed at changing 
attitudes and behavior which will build 
optimum efficiency and happiness in each 
student for today as well as for the future 
as a parent and citizen. 

Two Semesters 

All girls at the University enroll in 
health education for two semesters, each 
class meeting twice a week. The courses 
deal with personal and community health. 
Since they are designed for girls entirely, 
emphasis is given to the special health 
problems and responsibilities of women — 
as for example, spending the food dollar 
and the medical dollar wisely; maternal 
and child care, and home nursing. 

The classes are generally informal with 
as much student participation as can be 
arranged. Each class designs its own pro- 
gram and small group discussions, panel 
discussions, the use of visual aids, and 
various other techniques are used. Empha- 
sis is placed on the girl's participation and 
contribution in class and her regular out- 
side reading rather than upon lectures. 
Two-fold Program 

Since health is one of the first objec- 
tives of all education and since all 
teachers are presumed to be teachers of 
health, it is hoped that more specific train- 
ing in health education may become a 
part of the education of all teachers. Our 
program is two-fold in meeting this great 
need. First, we have a limited amount of 
services to offer schools in Maryland that 
are interested in improving their existing 
programs — their health services, healthful 
environment and/or their health instruc- 
tional program. This service may be in 
the form of an extension course or it 
may be in the form of consultation with 
a member of our health education staff. 
A> the demands for this type of service 
have increased, more time has been made 
availabl(> to staff members to be of serv- 
ice to Maryland schools and communi- 
ties, although the amount of service is yet 
limited. 

In order to reach the greatest number of 
schools, governmental and voluntary agen- 
cies as well as lay groups, we meet with 




RICE'S STAR BREAD 

Popular — because it's Qooct! 



CRISFIELD, MARYLAND 



DUNCAN BROTHERS, INC. 

CHEVROLET • OLDS • CADILLAC 
GMC TRUCKS • GREAT DANE TRAILERS 

Sales & Service 

"First In Service Because We Put Service First" 

Telephones 255-455-655 

POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



TIEDER & GOOTEE 

APPLIANCE SALES & SERVICE 

Electrical Contractors 

Installation, Maintenance & Repairs 
House Wiring and Motor Work 

Day Phone 1 225 • Night Phone 1 245 

510 Maryland Ave. Cambridge, Md. 




WEBSTER 

"THE COAL MAN" 

SMALL LOTS TO CARLOADS 

Coll Hurlock 3561 or 3571 

East New Market, Md. 



E. MACE SMITH 

Buyers & Shippers of Farm Produce 

FERTILIZERS, FEEDS OF ALL KINDS, 

BEAN BASKETS, ETC. 
Phone 163 Princess Anne, Md. 



E. S. ADKLNS & COMPANY 

"Everything Needed for Building" 
PHONE 3171 SALISBURY, MD. 



25' 




ALBERT 
W. SISK 

& SON 

National Distributors 

of 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

"SELLING SINCE 1891" 

Two Offices To Serve You: 
PRESTON, MD. 
ABERDEEN, MD. 



R. B. BAKER 
& SONS, Inc. 

Road Contractors 

Specializing in Macadam & Gravel 

NEW MARKET SAND & GRAVEL 
FOR SALE 

PHONE 3351 

QUEENSTOWN, MD. 




BRADLEY'S 
HATCHERY 

BroilerBred Chicks 

N. Aurora Street 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



representatives of these groups for as- 
sistance in our planning. Workshops in 
health education are held in the summer 
on campus and in communities as ex- 
tension courses during the school year. 
Here teachers, school administrators, 
nurses, health officers, voluntary agency 
representatives and others are brought 
together to improve the health, happi- 
ness and efficiency of every school child 
as well as the rest of the community as 
a whole. 

The second part of the health educa- 
tion program at Maryland is involved in 
the health education training of prospec- 
tive teachers. As yet only the physical 
education students receive special train- 
ing, many of them selecting a minor in 
the field. An effort is made to give these 
people the kind of education and expe- 
rience that will help them assist other 
teachers, since frequently the physical 
education teacher is found to be the only 
teacher in a school with health education 
training. 

As school people and community people 
become more aware of the tremendous 
need for health education, the demand 
for qualified teachers will undoubtedly 
grow. There are. indeed, increasing num- 
bers of opportunities for health educa- 
tors who are able to work with volun- 
tary and governmental agencies in com- 
munity health programs or combined 
school and community programs. 

Gymkono Troupe 
The Gymkana Troupe, coached by Dr. 
Dave Field, visited five service camps and 
did 10 shows. 

They arrived at 
Camp Pickett, Va., at 
noon on a Friday and 
put on one show at 
the hospital at 3 p.m. 
and another at the 
camp theater at 8 p.m. 
Then on to Fort Lee, 
Va., for a show at 
9:30 a.m., Saturday. 

Then came visits to 
Fort Eustis, Quantico 
Marine Base and Pa- 
tuxent Naval Air Sta- 
tion, Md. with troupe 
back at campus by 12:30 midnight Sunday. 
Last year the troupe went to Idaho and 
Montana to put on shows for the Air Force 
at Mt. Home, Galiver Field and Great 
Falls. They traveled in a MATS C-54 
transport and spent five days in the west. 
This year Gymkana hopes to do another 
series of shows for the Air Force with the 
possibility of going to Iceland or Alaska. 

Returns from Korea 

Army Capt. Harold C. Donofrio, (Phys. 
Ed. '51), has returned from Korea under 
the rotation program. 

He served in the 25th Infantry Division, 
now the senior American division on the 
peninsula. It landed in July 1950, shortly 
after the Communists attacked the Re- 
pulic of South Korea. 

Commanding Officer of Company C of 
the 35th Regiment, Captain Donofrio was 
recalled to active duty in June 1951, ar- 
riving in Korea the following September. 
He has been awarded the Combat Infan- 
tryman Badge. 




Field 



He was a member of Maryland's varsity 
boxing team. 

To Recreation Board 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson of the College 
of Physical Education and Recreation, has 
been named as a part-time program super- 
visor for the Prince Georges County Rec- 
reation Board. 

He will assist Mrs. 
Ellen E. Linson. 
county recreation di- 
rector, in establishing 
teen-age canteens and 
supervising "in-serv- 
ice" training institutes 
for recreation leaders. 
Dr. Johnson has 
served on the Mary- 
land faculty for nearly 
three years. Before 
coming to College 
Park, he taught at the 
University of Denver, public schools in 
Denver, and at the University of Arkansas 
summer school. He received his under- 
graduate and master's degrees from the 
University of Denver and his doctorate at 
Boston University. Part of his doctorate 
work was accomplished at Harvard. 

During World War II, he served as a 
fighter pilot in the Marines with the rank 
of first lieutenant. It was after his dis- 
charge from the service in 1945, that Dr. 
Johnson began teaching at the University 
of Denver. His chief interest is in the 
physiological and psychological effects of 
athletic activity upon participants. 




Dr. Johnson 



Band Makes Hit 

"Fifteen bands were spotted along the 
route of the parade", reported William 
Knighton. Jr.. covering, for the Baltimore 
Sun, the reception accorded President- 
Elect Eisenhower upon his return to Wash- 
ington recently, "with the University of 
Maryland band at one of the most stra- 
tegic spots — Fifteenth street and Penn- 
sylvania avenue. 

"Ten drum majorettes, not only per- 
formed the usual gyrations that accom- 
panies baton-twirling, but delighted the 
crowd with a massed Charleston dance — 
one performing difficult acrobatics. 

"Ike was standing bare-headed in his 
open car as he approached the student 
musical organization, waving to the ap- 
plauding throng, some times with one hand, 
then the other, and then with both arms 
extended in a "V." 

"Sighting the color guard in front of 
the Maryland band just before his car 
arrived opposite the red-coated musicians, 
he reached down into the car for his hat, 
stood at attention and gave the colors the 
civilian salute — hat in right hand held over 
the heart. 

"A shower of confetti greeted him at 
this point." 

WITH BOYS' CLUBS 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, USMC (Ret), 
Director of Publications and Publicity, has 
been made Chairman of the activities pro- 
gram committee of the Metropolitan Police 
Boys Club, of which he has long been a 
member of the Board of Governors as well 
as of the Executive Committee. 



261 



Nine Advantages of 
Washington Permanent 

Home Loans 

LOW RATES— EASY PAYMENTS 

LONG TIME TO PAY 

INTEREST REDUCED MONTHLY 

LIBERAL REPAYMENT 

PROMPT SERVICE 

DEAL WITH LOCAL PEOPLE 

EXPERT COUNSEL— NO RED TAPE 

We welcome your inquiry 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 
INVITED 

LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 

viashinaton. Ytrmanznt 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

Carl J. Bergmann, President 

629 F STREET, N. W. 

Established 1881 



"EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 
For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 New York Avenue, N.E. ME 8-4126 
Washington 2, D.C. 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 8-5918 Washington, D.C. 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 

Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 

Col. 0. II. Saunders 'io 
A . Lawrence Guess '51 



Annual Meeting 

THE 1952 meeting of the Engineering 
Alumni, 47 strong, occurred on Satur- 
day, October 25th, homecoming day. The 
meeting was presided over by C. A. War- 
then, '08, in the absence of Colonel O. H. 
Saunders, '10, out-going Chairman of the 
Engineering Alumni Board. (It was ru- 
mored that Colonel Saunders was elk 
hunting and, being the determined sort, 
had stayed over a few extra days on his 
trip in the hopes of at least one elk.) 

The meeting was called to order with a 
reading of the purposes of the Alumni 
Association and Engineering Chapter by 
Secretary S. C. Ward, '32. A report of the 
past year's work of the Engineering Alumni 
written by Col. Saunders was then read 
by Warthen; it is being published in 
full in an accompanying article. 

Balloting this year for nominees for 
vacancies on the board of directors was 
encouraging with 190 ballots being cast. 
This represented the largest number of 
ballots ever cast and compared to 141 
cast last year. Elected to the board with 
their term to expire in 1955 were George 
A. Wick, '23; John C. Dye, '34; Harold 
Earp, '42. 

Other members now on the board are 
as follows : 

Term expiring 1953, 0. H. Saunders, 
TO; C. V. Koons, '29; S. C. Ward, '32. 

Term expiring 1954. C. A. Warthen, '08; 
E. V. Lank, '34; J. C. Forsyth, '48. 

Also voiced on the ballots cast was the 
Engineering Alumni's reaction to the pro- 
posed amendment to article VIII — Section 
1, to hold the annual meeting in the Spring 
on the Friday preceding Commencement 
or as such other time as might be de- 
termined by the board of Directors. The 
vote was 163-21 in favor of the amend- 
ment. 

Dean Steinberg's Report 

Dean Steinberg then brought the assem- 
bly up to date on the doings of the College 
of Engineering. The Dean pointed out 
that all but two of the nine buildings com- 
prising the College of Engineering are 
either started or completed, which means 
we have at Maryland one of the finest 
University facilities in the country for 
teaching engineering. Also accomplished 
in the past year was the accrediting of 
the new Aeronautical Engineering De- 
partment. This now means that all depart- 
ments of the College of Engineering are 
accredited, which bears quite a contrast to 
the College as it existed 16 years ago, 
when Mr. Steinberg took over as Dean. 
None of the departments were accredited 
at that time. The enrollment, said the 
Dean, is now about 800 undergraduates as 
compared to the all time high of 1650 in 
1946 when the GI bill was in full swing. 

The 800 figure approaches the 1000 mark 
for which the College buildings are de- 



Sheet Metal 



Skylights 



*^rrvin f-^richett 

GENERAL ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

Phone Lincoln 6-1344 



1504 48th PLACE, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 



TO SAVE FUEL 

see DR. BUELL for 

CARBURETOR & IGNITION 
SERVICE 

81 l-10th St., N.W. ME 8-5777 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 



SAVE AT 



Tin 




Washington 

It's never too early, or too 
late to begin to save . . . Habits 
of thrift formed today could 
mean the difference between 
success and failure for you in 
the years ahead. 

Determine NOW to save a 
part of all you receive, and 
have funds in reserve when 
you need them most. 

District 7-2370 

FIRST F€D€RflL 

SflVIDGS^nflSSn 

610 13th St., N.W. (bet. F & G) 



USE THIS COUPON 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of WASHINGTON 
610 13th Street, N.W. (bet. F 6 G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 

Inclosed is check for $ 

to open a Savings Account . . . OR — 
Please send information about Savings 
Service □ 



Name- 



Street Phone .. 

City State... 



27 



[zJuenoli] utosts 

to the 
L{niversitif ^Joiks 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find comfort and conveni- 
ence at your beck and call! 

Free Parking 

Rooms & Cottages 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Ave. 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



THE 

WASHINGTON 

BRICK CO. 

Manufacturers & Distributors of 

CLAY PRODUCTS 

COMMON BRICK 

FACE BRICK 
CINDER BLOCK 

SLAG BLOCK 

FLUE LINING 

DRAIN TILE 

SEWER PIPE 

WALL COPING 

There's Nothing Better 
On the Market 

OFFICE & PLANT ON THE 

Washington-Baltimore Blvd. 

MUIRKIRK, MARYLAND 

Phone: TOWER 9-6300 



Del Haven White House Cottages 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 50 Brick Cottages 

Tile Baths 
F. M. IRWIN, Proprietor TOWER 9-4852 



signed. Also of interest is the fact that 
466 graduate students enrolled in the Col- 
lege of Engineering last year. 

The job opportunity service set up by 
the Engineering Alumni Chapter seems 
to be functioning nicely and all Engineer- 
ing Alumni should keep in mind the knowl- 
edge of its existence. As the Dean points 
out. there are more jobs than engineers 
these days and the available jobs for 
alumni coming to his attention range from 
S5.000 to $9,000— sounds worth checking 
into. 

A motion was made to send Colonel 
Saunders a note of appreciation for his 
service rendered to the Engineering Alum- 
ni Chapter in his two very active years as 
chairman of the board. The motion was 
unanimously passed. 

A plea was made by secretary Ward for 
more subscriptions to the Alumni publi- 
cation. "Maryland". Even though 29 per- 
cent of the Engineering Alumni subscribe, 
which is the best record on campus. 
it is felt that "Maryland' - rates 100 per- 
cent subscription. 

With tentative plans for meeting in the 
Spring, the meeting was adjourned at 11 :10 
A.M. 

Oldest Alumnus 

The oldest Alumnus present at the 1952 
Alumni meeting was Charles W. Cairnes, 
1894. MAC. 

Aeronautical Engineering Department 

The Aeronautical Engineering Depart- 
ment has recently completed construction 
of a new supersonic wind tunnel with the 
work being closely directed by Prof. A. 
W. Sherwood. Previously five Japanese 
tunnels of circular cross section were in 
use but for the present these tunnels have 
been laid aside. The new tunnel has a 
6x6 inch square test section and the 
present nozzle blocks are giving a Mach 
number of 2.2. (The probable maximum 
Mach number will be 3.5 to 4.) The test 
section has glass doors on each side making 
for good visibility and also the installation 
of a very good Schlieren optical system. 
The test model is mounted so that it can 
be rotated through — 10° to 10' by remote 
control and pressure readings from the 
model are recorded on a G. E. recording 
oscilloscope. 

A big improvement has been made in 
the running time and the pump down time 
for the new tunnel. The capacity of the 
vacuum tanks has been more than doubled 
by the addition of a new 1500 cubic foot 
tank, bringing the total capacity to 2500 
cubic feet, and a 100 horsepower vacuum 
pump has been installed. It is now possi- 
ble to get a 10 second supersonic run every 
two minutes. 

The tunnel was built at practically no 
cost to the University since Prof. Sher- 
wood made excellent use of surplus ma- 
terial. For instance, the air dryer was an 
old air conditioning unit and the quick 
opening valve, which was designed by Mr. 
C. E. MeAlister. is composed of many 
surplus parts, including a shaft made from 
an old automobile axle from Channey's 
Garage. 

The supersonic ttinnel will be put to 
good use. At present undergraduate stu- 
dents are using the tunnel in their aero- 
nautical laboratory course. Also, several 



research projects are being proposed. 

Compared to other tunnels, it is prob- 
ably the most advanced tunnel in the 
country for use b} - undergraduate students. 
A few other schools have larger and more 
elaborate tunnels but for the most part, 
they are government financed and veiled 
with classified projects. 

Electrical Engineering 

Recent changes in Faculty: — 

Mr. Joseph R. Schulman has recently 
been appointed Lecturer in Applied Elec- 
tronics replacing Mr. John W. Stunt z who 
resigned to accept a position with the 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. m Baltimore. 
Mr. Schulman is a graduate of the City 
College of New York and holds a Master 
of Science Degree in the Electrical Engi- 
neering from the University of Maryland. 
He is employed as Senior Engineer at the 
Davies Laboratories and teaches only a 
single course at the University, namely. 
Applied Electronics. It has been the prac- 
tice of the Electrical F.ngineering Depart- 
ment for many years to have a practicing 
engineer teach this specialized course. 

Recent additions and improvements to 
department facilities have been made. 

The Aeronautical and Electrical Engi- 
neering Departments have recently ac- 
quired the Differential Analyzer which 
had been in use at Aberdeen Proving 
(hounds. The Differential Analyzer is an 
electro-mechanical device designed to solve 
differential equations and is particularly 
useful in the solution of non-linear equa- 
tions or those having non-constant coeffi- 
cients. 

Mechanical Engineering 

The semi-annual meeting of the A.S.M.E. 
was held in New York the week of De- 
cember 1. 1952. Faculty members attend- 
ing this meeting were C. A. Sh reeve. R. W. 
Allen. R. H. Long. Jr.. J. W. Jackson. C. R. 
Hayleck. Jr.. M. S. Ojalvo. 

Report for Past Year 

This is a short summary of some of the 
activities of your Engineering Alumni 
Board for the year (1952) just passed, with 
;i tew suggestions for the year now begin- 
ning. 

Your Board met five times during the 
year as follows : 

Nov. 3. 1951 — organization. 

Nov. 19. 1951 — Committee assignments 
made and plans begun for Spring Rally. 
Job Opportunity Service given a push. 

Jan. 21. 1952 — plans laid for securing ad- 
ditional material for Publicity Committee 
by contacting engineers of 1927 Class. 
Awards Committee asked to take over 
suggestions from members of Alumni. 

Mar. 10. 1952 — Plans completed for Joint 
Rally with Aits and Sciences and also Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. Plan of 
Awards Committee referred for further 
exploration anil final plans for Joint Spring 
Rally approved. 

July 28. 1952— Plans laid for Homecom- 
ing on 25 Oct., next. 

The above reported Board Meetings 
were well attended by your elected repre- 
sentatives. The efforts of the Board well 
merit the thanks of the Alumni. 

The members of the Board named to 
the over-all Council, namely. Ward. '32; 
Koons, '23: Saunders. '10: with Wart hen 






28 



"OS as alternate, attended meetings of the 
over-all Council held in Baltimore as 
follows: 

9 Nov., 1951; 11 Jan., 1052: 16 May. 
1952; and — Sept.. 1952. 

Past Presidents of the Engineering 
Alumni Hoard and Commit Ice Chairmen 
as well as members of the Hoard, together 
with Dean Steinberg and Alumni Secre- 
tary Dave Brigham were regular attend- 
ants at Hoard meetings. We especially 
thank them for their advice and courteous 
assistance. 

The Job Opportunity Service Commit- 
tee, of Cut ting as Chairman with Wart hen 
and Ward as members and Dean Steinberg 
as a most helpful ex-officio member did 
an excellent job of putting the plan re- 
ported upon last year into practice. You 
will hear more of that later. 

The Awards Committee with Yandoren 
as Chairman and Dean Steinberg and 
Brigham as ex-officio members came up 
with fine proposal to perpetuate the mem- 
ories of former heads of Engineering at 
the University and other distinguished 
teachers of engineering thereat. You will 
hear more of that later. 

Other Committees worked hard and 
unselfishly to carry out assigned tasks. 
All are deserving of our thanks, and I am 
sure the body of the Engineering Alumni 
wish me to tender such thanks. 

The Joint Rally in the spring was not 
an outstanding satisfaction to the Com- 
mittee that worked so hard and long in 
planning and arranging for it. nor to your 
Board, who authorized it. The attendance 
was very small, and should give cause for 
your Board of next year to consider some 
other action to replace the Spring Rally. 

The Publicitv Committee was ably han- 
dled by Prof."R. K. Warner. M.E.. '47, 
during the first part of the year, but he 
wis compelled to give up the task after 
one year on the job and in the spring he 
was replaced, temporarily, by the Chair- 
man of the Engineering Board, whose term 
on this job is to terminate at the same 
time as his office as Chairman of the En- 
gineering Board expires. Reports indicate 
that the news collecting for the Engineer- 
ing spread in the magazine, Maryland, 
kept up to its high standard of previous 
issues. 

As outgoing President or Chairman of 
the Engineering Alumni Board. I wish to 
give my thanks to all members of the 
Board and Committees, together with Dean 
Steinberg and Alumni Secretary Dave 
Brigham. for their unselfish and loyal 
efforts in connection with Alumni matters. 
In my opinion, no University has a more 
devoted group of Alumni than is pre- 
sented by the active members of the En- 
gineering Alumni of the University of 
Maryland. 

Also, let me say. that every member of 
the Engineering Alumni deserves thanks 
for his support, be it much or little. May 
it grow as the years pass. 

Suggestions 

1. Push subscriptions to the magazine 
Maryland. 

2. Keep the Job Opportunity Service 
functioning at top efficiency. 

3. Get behind the Awards Committee in 
its efforts to perpetuate the memories of 
past instructors. 





The George Hyman 
Construction Co. 






ENGINEERS 


& 






CONTRACTORS 










1010 VERMONT AVE., N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 





4. Get behind the Centennial Celebra- 
tion being advanced for 1956. 

5. Seek contributions to the Scholarship 
Fund being backed by the Central Council 
of the Alumni. 

6. Give serious consideration to a change 
as to the Spring Rally, either by abandon- 
ing the Rally or by so changing its type as 
to draw more attendance than has been 
the recent result. 

7. By all means support the University 
of Maryland Alumni on every possible 
occasion. 

Respectfully submitted : 

O.'h. SAUNDERS, 
Out-going Chairman of the Engr. 
Alumni Board. 

Promoted by IBM. 

Sydney S. Stabler, Jr., (Engr. '39) has 
been promoted to Time Recording Man- 
ager of its Washington Commercial office 
of the International Business Machines 
Corporation. 

Mr. Stabler had been special representa- 
tive in the Washington Federal office. He 
joined I.B.M. in 1949 in Washington and 
served in several sales capacities prior to 
his present promotion. Mr. Stabler re- 
sides at 4328 Claggett Road, Hyattsville, 
Md. The fifth addition to the Stabler fam- 
ily has recently arrived to approve of the 
promotion of the head of the house. 

In Puerto Rico 

Dean S. S. Steinberg attended the Inter- 
American Convention of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers at San Juan. 
Puerto Rieo. 

Dean Steinberg represented the Presi- 
dent's Conference on Industrial Safety, of 
which he is chairman of the Committee on 
Education. He presented a paper on 
"Safety Integration into Engineering Cur- 
ricula." Dean Steinberg was also invited 
to address the students and faculty of the 
College of Engineering of the University 
of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

NEAR UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-2995 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



E. S. McKEOWN 

PLUMBING & HEATING 

• CONTRACTING 

• REPAIRING 

• REMODELING 

• APPLIANCE 

Sales & Installation 
SMALL enough to want your work 
. . . and BIG enough to do it 

WArfield 7-7695 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



FOLLIN'S 

Sales and Service 

UNion 4-1500 College Park, Md. 



29 



Williams 

Construction 

Company 

Grading 

Concrete & 

Macadam Paving 

Phone: Essex 1310 
BALTIMORE 20, MD. 



Mccormick 

& CO., Inc. 

The World's Largest 
Spice and Extract House 

• BALTIMORE 

• NEW YORK 

• SAN FRANCISCO 

P.S. And be sure to buy 
the tea with the big Mc! 




KERR'S POTATO CHIPS 

Made in Baltimore 
By 

DAVID KERR, INC. 



School of ■ 



Nursing 

- Barbara Ardis '45 

They Get Around 

WHILE graduates of the School of 
Nursing have just reason to be 
proud of the State of Maryland there is, 
apparently nothing provincial about alum- 
nae's post graduate activities. Note wide- 
spread geographical locations hereinafter 
mentioned. 

In Missouri 

Mrs. Henry V. Guhleman, Jr., formerly 
Florence Laws, '44. is living in Jefferson 
City. Missouri, with daughter, Patricia 
Ann, born November 1950. Dr. Guhleman 
is practicing neurology and psychiatry, a 
real pioneer job in this community, but 
there is a real need and it is indeed a 
challenge. The Guhlemans are proud of 
the fact that in their efforts to stimulate 
interest in a mental health program for 
the state they are able to use Maryland 
as an example of one of the more pro- 
gressive states in this field. 

They are on the main East-West route 
and would be happy to have any of the 
Alumnae going through to the coast stop 
over and see them. 

It's "Captain" Now 

Lt. Marguerite W. Foster, A. N. C. Class 
1939. has been promoted to Captain, and 
is stationed at Munich. Germany. Cap- 
tain Foster expects to remain abroad for 

three years. 

In Newport, R. I. 

Commander and Mrs. R. C. Speed, Jr., 
are living at 70 Mill St.. Newport, R. I., 
where the Commander is teaching at the 
Officers' Candidate School. Mrs. Speed 
was retired from the Navy Nurse Corps 
on April 1st with the rank of Lt. Com- 
mander, on account of illness. Mrs. Speed 
was in the 1932 Class. 

Levittown, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Montgomery, 
and their little daughter. Jayne Tracey, 
are living in their new home at 68 Shelter 
Lane. Levittown, Pa. They moved into 
their home about August 15, 1952. Mrs. 
Montgomery was Lorraine Brechiel, Class 
1944. 

At Hyattsville 

Miss Ananda V. Crew, Class 1947, is on 
the Staff of Prince George's County, Mary- 
land, doing Public Health Nursing. Miss 
Crew is living in Hyattsville, Md. 

In Los Angeles 

Word has been received that Miss Velma 
Kish, Class 1923, received her Master's 
Degree from the University of Michigan 
in 1946. She then took a position with 
California Hospital in Los Angeles. Since 
she has joined the staff the student body 
has tripled, and both the degree program 
and the non-degree program have been 
set up. With all this she has found the 
time to teach at the University of South- 
ern California and also at the Los Angeles 
City College. Besides being teacher, she 
has been student and has completed about 



one-fourth of the necessary requirements 
for her Doctorate degree. May we say 
that we are proud of Miss Kish's achieve- 
ments, though she is prone to say "It's 
nothing." 

Camp Polk, La. 

1st Lt. and Mrs. V. E. Van Horn, Jr. 
are stationed at Camp Polk. Louisiana. 
They returned from Europe early in the 
summer after several years of duty abroad. 
Mrs. Van Horn was Frances M. Hicks, 
'47. 

In Japan 

Lt. and Mrs. William Kaufman are in 
Japan, where they expect to remain until 
1954. Mrs. Kaufman was Margaret 0. 
Stein, '47. 

At Fox Lake, III. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Rose have opened 
a store in Fox Lake. Illinois. Mrs. Thelma 
Crooks Rose was in the "52 Class. She is 
doing private nursing in her spare time. 

In Silver Spring 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerome E. Manheimer 
have moved to a new home at 617 Gist 
Avenue. Silver Spring, Md. Mrs. Man- 
heimer was Rhea Gerber. '27. 
In Texas 

Captain and Mrs. Willfor Eppes and 
their two children are stationed in Fort 
Bliss. Texas. Mrs. Eppes was Emily Mulli- 
gan, '47. 

In Kentucky 

Captain and Mrs. Harold N. Taylor 
are stationed in Fort Campbell. Ky. They 
have a young daughter born in April, 
1952. Mrs. Taylor was Doris Wahle, '45. 

In Iowa 

Lt. and Mrs. J. B. Gregg are stationed 
in Coralville. Iowa. Mrs. Gregg was Paul- 
ine Snyder, '45. 

At Salisbury, Md. 

Emma Mergardt Stow. '94, has been 
confined to the Deer's Head Hospital, 
Salisbury Md.. for a fracture of her hip. 

Nursing Lectures 

Mr. Richard H. Stottler. Director of 
Institutes, and Assistant Professor Mar- 
garet Hayes, School of Nursing, addressed 
the Third District Maryland State Nurses 
Association at the Prince Georges Hos- 
pital. Mr. Stottler discussed "Adult Edu- 
cation Programs of your State University" 
and Miss Hayes discussed "The Profes- 
sional Nursing Program of your State 
University." 




CUSTARD'S LAST PIE 

. . . "and I hereby tender my resignation, 
not only as Teena but also as Berwyn Bart, 
leader of the paleface posse." 



30 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix 'j4 
i Gardiner P. II. Foley 



Homecoming Message 

HARRY LEVIN, President of the Na- 
tional Alumni Association, has an- 
nounced that the largest alumni meeting 
in the history of the world's first dental 
college will be held on next March 4, 5 
and 6. The program details given in Mary- 
land indicate the attractive and instruc- 
tive features that have been arranged to 
provide our returning alumni with an im- 
pressive combination of professional and 
social activities. 

For several months two committees 
working under the direction of Dr. George 
M. Anderson '19. representing the Alumni 
Lssociation, and Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg 
'22. representing the Faculty of the School, 
have been engaged in organizing this out- 
standing meeting. For several years the 
alumni officers have felt that there was a 
definite and pressing need for presenting 
a program that would bring back several 
hundred of our graduates to their alma 
mater for a reunion gathering that would 
meet with their highest expectations. In- 
cluded in the program will be the annual 
five-year Class Reunions and also attrac- 
tive features for the entertainment of the 
wives of the returning alumni. 

The committees have endeavored to 
provide a scientific program covering every 
phase of general dental practice. Each 
participant is an alumnus who has achieved 
wide recognition for the contribution he 
has made in his special field. We know 
that you will derive excellent benefits 
from the various sessions you will chose 
to attend. You will also experience fine 
opportunities for renewing old friendships 
with your classmates and teachers. An- 
other memorable highlight will be the 
School's participation in the program. 
There will be a morning devoted to an 
inspection of all the School's facilities for 
the training of students for the practice of 
dentistry. Each department will be fully 
staffed for the occasion and various phases 
of the departmental activities will be illus- 
trated by informative exhibits. The trip to 
College Park and the tour of the campus 
there will afford many an alumnus with the 
opportunity to see for the first time the 
undergraduate division of the University. 

To climax the three-day meeting there 
will be the dinner honoring Dr. J. Ben 
Robinson on the eve of his retirement after 
a long and remarkably productive period 
of service as the Dean of your School of 
Dentistry. 

Committees 

For several months two committees, rep- 
resenting the Alumni Association and the 
Faculty of the School, have been working 
under direction of chairman George M. 
Anderson and Myron S. Aisenberg. 

Alumni Committee: L. W. Bimestefer, 
Arthur Davenport, Ethelbert Lovett, John 
Michael and Edmond Vanden Bosche. 

Faculty Committee: Joseph C. Biddix, 
Gardner P. H. Foley, Grayson W. Gaver, 
William E. Hahn, Marion W. McCrea and 
Katharine Toomev. 



Join the 

MARCH 

OF 
DIMES 




THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR INFANTILE PARALYSIS 



RESEARCH 

IS 
WINNING 



YOU CAN HELP, TOO! 

January 2 to January 3 1 

TURN OIS YOUR PORCH LIGHT! 

Wednesday, January 28 

MOTHER'S MARCH ON POLIO 

H. B. D. 



ttTTTTTTttTTI'TTTtTttTtTTttTTTtl'ttttttl'tTttTt+TI'ttTTTTtf 



INSTITUTION 
PHYSICIANS' 
SURGEONS' 




HOSPITAL 
NURSES' AND 
LABORATORY 



Murray-Baumgartner Surgical Instrument Co., Inc. 

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 
5 and 7 W. CHASE STREET BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

Telephone, SAratoga 7333 



TIRES 



FIRESTONE 



LANVALE 



McCREARY 

M9CREARY 

I Yl Built for Longer Service"\ 

I I TIRES VULCANIZING, Inc. 

RECAPPERS - RET READERS SINCE 1919 
DRIVE-IN SERVICE ROAD SERVICE 

2302-6 N. HOWARD ST. HO. 4880 BALTIMORE 18, MD. 




Phone JU. 5-4562 



.-ENGRAVING CO. 



969 T«AV€R AVfc- SILVER SPRING; MD-j 



PHOTOENGRAVERS OF 

FINE LINE, BENDAY, HALFTONE AND COLOR PRINTING PLATES 
ON ZINC, COPPER AND TRIPLEMETAL 



31] 



r 




WHEN THE "BEST DRESSED" GIRLS ON CAMPUS 

looked like this . . . 



Western Maryland Dairy was serving 
Baltimore with fine dairy products. 



"\ 



)AIRY PRODUCTS 



WESTERN MARYLAND DAIRY 

Division of National Dairy Products Corp. 
I 



Furniture 
Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

homes and institutions for 

over 55 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU. 4510 Baltimore, Md. 



J 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Specialties 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. Howard Street 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



WHITMAN, REQUARDT 
& ASSOCIATES 

Engineers • Consultants 

Civil — Sanitary — Structural 
Mechanical — Electrical 

Reports, Plans, 
Supervision, Appraisals 

1304 ST. PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, INC. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 
Located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 1990 BALTO., MD. 



Entertainment for Ladies 

The Alumni Meeting in March will in- 
clude several features that will be of in- 
terest to wives of the alumni who will 
come to Baltimore for the largest gather- 
ing of alumni in the long history of their 
alma mater. A particular effort is being 
made by the committees to encourage the 
attendance of the wives by providing for 
them an attractive group of events. These 
will include luncheons, a bus trip, a School 
visit, the testimonial dinner, and a fashion 
show. The committee in charge of the 
fashion show and luncheon is headed by 
.Mis. John Michael, who is being assisted 
by Mrs. Harry Levin. Mis. J. Ben Robin- 
son. Miss Katharine Toomey, and Mrs. 
Howard Van Natta. 

Additions to the Program 

The November-December issue of Mary- 
Imiil presented the preliminary program 
for the Alumni Meeting in Baltimore in 
March. There was an unfortunate omis- 
sion. The Section on Oral Pathology and 
Periodontics, scheduled for Friday at 2:30- 
3:30 and 3:30-4:30, respectively, will have 
papers by Dr. David Scott '43. of Bethesda 
Md., and Dr. Lewis Fox '27. of South Nor- 
walk. Conn. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



Completes Three Years 

MAJOR WILLIAM C. FLANNIGAN. 
Adjutant General of the 2058th Air 
Weather Wing, became the first Air Force 
Continuation Study student to accumu- 
late three year's college credit in Europe. 

Completion of three years study in Eu- 
rope while on active duty became even 
more remarkable when it was learned that 
Major Flannigan had not had prior col- 
lege credits when he began his program 
of study. Gaining 109 credits during his 
three year tour in Wiesbaden. Major Flan- 
nigan is now returning to the US with 
enough credits to obtain his degree through 
"Operation Bootstrap" which provides for 
six months study on campus. 

Scholastically, Major Flannigan excelled 



as a student, maintaining an outstanding 
record of scholastic achievement. Named 
to the Dean's list of honor students in each 
school year, he also received the Universi- 
ty's Scholastic Achievement Award for the 
School Year 1949-50 and the USAREUR 
Military Achievement Award during the 
same period, both for outstanding scholas- 
tic achievement in Europe. 

"This record of achievement should 
serve as an inspiration to servicemen and 
women throughout Europe who are plan- 
ning to continue their educational ad- 
vancement", commented Dean Ray Ehr- 
ensberger. S&CS. 

Major Flannigan is one of more than 
10.000 students studying in more than 93 
centers located from Eritrea, Africa, to 
Wiesbaden. Germany. In Germany alone 
there are 47 educational centers where 
students may continue their studies. Other 
centers can be found in the North At- 
lantic Command. 



%• ■ 




FIRST 3-YEAR MAN 

Major William C. Flannigan, left, in Heidel- 
berg, Germany, receives Certificate of Achieve- 
ment from Dean Ray Ehrensberger. Major 
Flannigan, Adjutant General for the 2058th 
Air Weather Wing, recently became the first 
Air Force student in Europe to complete three 
years college credit without prior college ex- 
perience. Major Flannigan, who is the father 
of three children, is returning to the US shortly, 
to resume his studies through "Operation Boot- 
strap" at the University of Maryland campus. 



In February, Major Flannigan will be 
assigned to the rjniversity of Maryland for 
six months. To obtain his degree in Mili- 
tary Science, he must complete 27 credits 
of work during that period. 

Nursing Institute 

A one day Industrial Nursing Institute 
was held in Baltimore. The theme of the 
institute was "How to Make Your Nursing 
Program Pay Off." University of Maryland 
personnel participating included Dean 
Florence M. Gipe, School of Nursing: Dr. 
Mary K. Carl, educational advisor, Col- 
lege of Special and Continuation Studies; 
Mr. John L. Coulter, Jr.. assistant pro- 
fessor of English ; and Dr. Gladys Wiggins, 
professor of Education. 



[32; 



ERCO Students 

Members of the staff of the Engineering 
and Research Corporation (ERCO) of 
Riverdale may now enroll in University 

courses taught under the auspices of the 
College of Special and Continuation Stud- 
ies. 

The program of study features courses 
in algebra, business administration, and 
industrial (-duration. Each class will meet 
30 times. 

The courses are officially credited by the 
University and. as such, will lie recognized 
by all accredited colleges and universities. 

Combat Soldier 

The Combat Infantryman Badge for 
excellent performance of duty under 
enemy fire in Korea recently was awarded 
to PFC Bruce F. Wellborn, who attended 
S. & C. S. '49-ol. He is the son of Dr. Fred 
W. Wellborn, a professor in the History 
Dept. 

Bruce is a member of the 2d Infantry 
Division, which gained fame in two of the 
hardest fought battles of the Korean war. 
It captured "Heartbreak Ridge" in Octo- 
ber 1951 and took "Old Baldy Hill" this 
summer. 

Private First Class Wellborn entered 
the Army in March 1951 and joined the 
2d Division last June. He has been 
awarded the Parachutist Badge. 

Home from Germany 

Capt. Alfred A. Xeverick, New Britain, 
Conn., who attended S. & C. S. '49- '50, has 
returned to the United States for release 
from active duty after a tour of service in 
Europe. 

He served as assistant provost marshal 
in Augsburg and Stuttgart Military Posts. 

Captain Xeverick has the distinction of 
having participated in the first atom bomb 
test on Bikini. 



Speaks on France 

Henri Ruffin. First Secretary of the 
French Embassy, discussed the subject 
''France and the Organization of the West," 
at the University. Moderator for the 
forum, which was sponsored by the 
Women's and Men's Leagues, was Dr. 
Adolph E. Zucker. head of the Foreign 
Languages Department. 




Terrapintopics 



A PICKPOCKET is 
someone who goes 
III rough your pockets 
without benefit oj a mar- 
riage, license . . . Speed is 
oj little value if you 
travel in circles . . . When 
a woman says, "It's a 
man's world" something 
just went wrong . . . It 
is easy to be generous to a fault — espe- 
cially regarding your ou-n faults . . . Even 
with no education you must use your 
brains . . . Some women do not diet. They 
allow destiny to shape their ends . . . 
Some guys are so narrow mindi d because 
they were brought up in an alley. 




Season to taste — 
heat and serve! 



Our Cooker-Cooked corn is cooked and 
sealed just 15 minutes after it is pulled ! 
Natural flavor, tenderness and color is sealed 
in . . . just like eating fresh corn on the cob! 



Packers of Whole Kernel Shoepeg and Golden Sweet Corn 

F. O. MITCHELL & BRO., INC 

Ferryman, Maryland - Kennedyville, Maryland 



MAIN OFFICE. PERRYMAN, MD. 



PHONE ABERDEEN 621-J 



SINCE 




189© 



Fidelity and Deposit 
company of maryland 

Home Office: Baltimore. *##/. 



FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 

Burglary, Robbery, Forgery & Glass Insurance 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 

Phone MUlberry 6070 Baltimore 2, Maryland 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE • BALTO. 13, MD. • BRoadway 1600 

(near intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



331 



William F. Nelson 
BRICK WORK 

Phone: TUckerman 2-2290 

3817 - 14th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WAS H I NGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 1 , M D 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 



JAFFE 

• PAPERING 

• PAINTING 

• HOUSE REPAIRS 

METROPOLITAN 8-2460 



911 13th St. N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 

Established 1850 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

District 7-0995 

522- 12th ST., S. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



College of 



Education 

June Jacobs Brown '48 

At Harvard 

HARVARD Graduate School of Edu- 
cation has announced the appoint- 
ment, as Assistant Professor, of Harry 
Levin (Un. of Md. B.S. '48, Education). 
Professor Levin later won his A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees at University of Michigan 
in '49 and '50, respectively. He has been 
associated with the Laboratory of Human 
Development at Harvard since 1950, first 
as a Social Science Research Council Post- 
doctoral Fellow studying theory and re- 
search methods in the socialization of the 
child, and then as a Research Associate. 
From 1944-46, Professor Levin, a native 
of Baltimore, served in the Army and 
during 1948-49 was Teaching Fellow in 
Psychology at the University of Michigan. 

Returns from Germany 

"If one were to summarize the feeling 
of the German people it is first to have no 
more wars and second, to rebuild their 
country and get back on their feet as 
quickly as possible." These are the words 
of Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, director of the 
Institute for Child Study at Maryland, 
who recently returned from Germany. 

Dr. Prescott was one of 18 staff mem- 
bers for the International Workshop of 
Educational Psychology at Frankfurt this 
summer. Under the direction of the State 
Department, the institute was organized 
to improve German education. 

The institute's plan was to bring the 
newest scientific knowledge of child de- 
velopment and educational psychology to 
the present German teachers who are 
training students to teach. 

The 18 staff members included educators 
and psychologists from the United States, 
England, and eight other European coun- 
tries who worked with 40 leading German 
educators. 

Conducted at the Hochschule Fuer In- 
ternationale Pedagogische Forschung, (the 
Higher School for International Pedagogi- 
cal Research), the institute began operat- 
ing in July. The sessions included three 
weeks of orientation study to learn the 
German educational problems. 

Following the institute study, Dr. Pres- 
cott and his wife took a trip through Ger- 
many before returning to the States. 

During their trip, the Prescotts visited 
Berlin to see the effects of the Russian 
domination of the eastern sector. The 
main feature of their trip was to evaluate 
the work of a child study institute at 
Stuttgart which Prescott set up in 1948. 

Prescott remarked that the change he 
noticed in Germany since 1948 is remark- 
able. The most impressive change is their 
clean-up program and the beginning of a 
reconstructed Germany, he stated. 

The Germans are interested in once 
more becoming an independent nation and 
are working in the United Western Europe 
program so that they may join NATO, 
Dr. Prescott remarked. 

Through cooperation of the State De- 



partment Dr. Prescott is working on a 
project here on the campus to further aid 
the Germans. The project is a 40 minute 
film showing actual classroom studies of 
American children. 

This film, which Prescott helped write 
and direct, is being made at an elementary 
school in Silver Spring. Scenes in the film 
will also be made at the nursery school 
at Maryland. 

Homecoming Meeting 

College of Education's 1952 Homecoming 
meeting was conducted by Mrs. J. Paul 
Duke. '50, who is teaching at Suitland 
High School in Prince Georges County. 
The discussion centered around general 
council meetings that were held in Balti- 
more. Three new members were elected 
to the board for three year terms. They 
are Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart McCaw '35 
and the writer. Miss Sudlow was elected 
president of the council, Mr. McCaw vice 
president. Mis. Duke secretary and the 
writer journal correspondent. Before the 
close of the meeting Dr. Devilbiss, the 
Dean of College of Education, welcomed 
homecoming alumni to visit the nursery 
school and classes in session. 

In Baltimore 

The new general alumni council met in 
Baltimore in November, Miss Sudlow, Mrs. 
Duke and Mr. McCaw representing Edu- 
cation. Plans were made to institute the 
alumni meetings in the spring. No definite 
date was set but each alumni group will 
decide upon a definite time. 

County Superintendents 

Four new county superintendents have 
recently been appointed. James Busic (Ed. 
'52) has been appointed in Dorchester 
County. Harry C. Rhodes (Ed. '47) has 
succeeded Frank Day who recently passed 
away. Mr. Day was a World War I vet- 
eran and graduated in the early 20's. 

Others appointed are Mr. Morris W. 
Rannels (Ed. '49) to Cecil County and 
Mr. Ralph R. Webster (Ed. '29) to Alle- 
gany County. 

"Teachers and Community" 

"Teachers and the Community" is the 
title of a pamphlet written by Dr. Harry 
Bard, (Phy. D. Ed. '51). The pamphlet, 
published by the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews, contains materials 
which Dr. Bard had developed for his 
doctorial thesis. He is assistant director 
of curriculum for the Baltimore public 
schools. 

In Prince Georges 

Miss Elizabeth McMahon, (Ed. '51), 
formerly principal of Brentwood Elemen- 
tary School, is now elementary supervisor 
in Prince Georges County. 

Staff Additions 

Mr. Samuel H. Patterson ('50) has been 
added to the Industrial Education staff. 
As a senior Mr. Patterson was voted the 
outstanding male student of the College 
of Education. 

Dr. William F. Tierny (Phy D. Ed. '52) 
is now a full time member of the staff. 
Dr. Tierney taught in the public schools 
of Connecticut for 6 years and at the 
Oswego, New York State Teachers College 
for 2 years. 



[34] 



At Colesville 

Caroline Allender Jennings '48 is now 
teaching second grade at Colesville Ele- 
mentary in Montgomery County. 

In Salisbury 

Sally Davis MeCune '48 has started a 
nursery school in the attic of her home 
in Salisbury, Maryland. She meets with 
her youngsters twice a week and reports 
that the group is progressing splendidly. 

New Building 

The new industrial education building 
i~ well under way. This new structure, in 
addition to providing more adequate space 
for existing shop activities, will house 
several new areas including graphic arts 
and automotives. 

Three curriculum will be centered in 
the industrial education building, namely 
industrial art teachers education, voca- 
tional teacher education and education for 
industry. 

Two Movies 

Directors, cameras, actors, et al, invaded 
the College Park campus as two studios 
were employed on two educational projects 
directed by the College of Education. One 
was by the Child Study Institute, while 
the other was Industrial Education pro- 
duction. 

Dr. Daniel Prescott, director of the Child 
Study group was in charge of a State De- 
partment film entitled "Helping Teachers 
to Understand Children," prepared for Ger- 
man educators and psychologists. 

This film features numerous instructors 
and students. 

Bobby Nick, a thirteen-year-old pro- 
fessional actor, was cast in the leading role 
as a sixth grade student at nearby Park- 
side Elementary School, Silver Spring. 
Frank Overton, who often appears on 
television in "Studio One," was the teacher. 

The film shows how a university can 
serve public schools with "in service" 
training in the schools themselves as well 
as on the campus, as well as the scope of 
scientific knowledge a teacher must have 
to understand children and practice demo- 
cratic group processes in the classroom. 
Such a program has never been used in 
German schools. 

The film will have sound tracks in 
German and English. 

"A Career in Industrial Arts Education" 
is the title of the other film. Dr. Donald 
Maley of the Industrial Education depart- 
ment- made the film himself with the aid 
of students. 

The purpose is to encourage high school 
students to become Industrial Arts teachers 
and shows the shops, classrooms, social 
and dorm life. 

Tracing the life of one "shop" student 
through high school, his choice of career 
and his years of training at Maryland. 
John Zuskin, a senior in Industrial Arts 
played the lead. 

• ••*••••••• 

E H R 
00 

The jellow who never makes a mistake 
lose* a great many chances to learn some- 
thing. The only ones who never strike 
out are those who never go to bat. 



The Crutch That Gives Support Without Strain . . . 





ALUMINUM CRUTCHES 

Featherweight But Strong! 

Adjustable to Forearm - Adjustable to Height 

An entirely new "sloping design" principle, 
to absorb shock, eliminate shoulder strain, 
distribute weight ... to give you maximum 
mobility, ease of action. Adult and junior 
sizes in a choice of styles. 

For Name of Your Nearest Dealer 
and Free Literature Write to — 

THE LOFSTRAND CO. 

Rockville, Md. 



ty€ Miller Controlled Community 

In Sumner you'll find splendidly expressed the superb taste of 
Miller design and the excellence of Miller-Built /homes, occupied 
by people of distinction. 

To reach Sumner — Drive out Massachusetts Avenue % mile 
beyond Westmoreland Circle to the Sumner sign on your left. 

W. C. AND A. N. MILLER 

DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 

Builders and Developers of Wesley Heights, Sumner, and Spring Valley 

4860 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D. C. EM. 2-4464 



In Electrical Engineering, It's 

E. C. ERNST, Inc. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1624 14th Street, N.W. Washington 9, D.C. 





WALLOP 


and 


SON 




J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Closs of 1919 


j. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, 
Class of 1942 


3rd 




• INSURANCE 


• 




Fire 


Automobile - Life 


Accident 


Liability 


Bonds 




EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 




Suite 405, 


1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W. 


EXecutiv* 3-1400 WASHINGTON S, D.C. 



'35' 




MILK IS BETTER 
In CLASS Bottles 

From the standpoint of good 
judgment you should SEE the 
milk you buy — its Quality and 
Quantity. From the standpoint 
of economics you should in- 
sist on receiving it in GLASS 
bottles. 

The life of a GLASS milk bot- 
tle, through its return and RE- 
USE, represents many trips; 
substitute containers make only 
one trip. The cost of the 
GLASS bottle, per trip, is a 
small fraction of other types — 
someone must absorb the dif- 
ference. 

INSIST ON YOUR MILK 
in GLASS Bottles 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort- Ave. & Lawrence St. 
Baltimore 30, Md. 



College of. 



Wholesalers of 
Plumbing & Heating Materials 

SCHUMACHER & 
SEILER, INC. 

MAIN OFFICE & STORE 
MONUMENT ST. & HARFORD AVE. 
SA. 0800 Baltimore 2, Md. 



Dr. Howard L. Stier 'j2 



Dairy Judging Team Second 

IN the 1952 National Collegiate Dairy 
Cattle Judging Contest, Maryland 
placed second in the judging of all breeds 
with a total score of 2008, only one point 
behind the winning team from Cornell. 
Thirty teams competed. 

Barbara Riggs was high individual in the 
judging of all breeds. She received the 
$500 Dean Kildee scholarship to be used 
for advanced study in the dairy field, a 
gold wrist watch, and a silver judging 
trophy. 

This is the first time the University of 
Maryland has had the high individual in 
the National contest. 

The Maryland team consisted of Bar- 
bara Riggs, Thomas Weller. William Huf- 
fard, William Merrill (alternate), and 
Coach J. W. Pou. The Maryland team 
members and Coach each received a hand 
engraved silver spur tie clasp. The team 
placed fifth in judging Jerseys, fourth in 
judging Ayrshire, third in Brown Swiss, 
and seventh in Guernseys. 

A rotating trophy was also awarded to 
the University of Maryland. This trophy 
is awarded annually to the University 
represented by the high individual in the 
contest. 

Barbara Riggs also received a $40.00 
cash award for obtaining the highest score 
on the giving of reasons. She tied for high 
score in the judging of Brown Swiss, tied 
for second in judging Jerseys, and tied 
for eighth in judging Ayrshires. 

Thomas Weller was the ninth highest 
scoring individual in the contest. 

This team previously placed first in the 
judging of all breeds in the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Judging Contest held at Spring- 
field. Mass. In this contest Thomas Weller 
was the highest scoring individual and 
William Huffard was the second highest 
scoring individual in the contest. 

Pasture Program 

The importance of an integrated pas- 
ture program — using adapted pastures to 
keep beef production high throughout 
the grazing season — was shown when the 
first phase of two and one half years of 
beef grazing trials was recently completed 
at the University of Maryland Tobacco 
Experimental Farm, near Upper Marlboro, 
involving the study of beef producing 
ability of five different pasture mixtures. 

Dr. Walls Retires 

Dr. Edgar Perkins Walls, Professor of 
Canning Corps, has retired. 

Since 1931 Dr. Walls has served in the 
University's Agriculture Extension Serv- 
ice, Experiment Station, and College 
of Agriculture, mostly associated with 
canning crops and canning technology. 

Influence of his work is evident through- 
out the canning industry in Maryland and 
nearby states. Many of his students man- 
age or operate processing establishments. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Walls, the 
Annual Short Course for Canners, Freez- 
ers and Fieldmen expanded to one of the 
nation's leading events in this field. 



^^^^^^r^rr^^^^^^ County Agents Honored 

a • I Four county agents were honored in 

APriCUilUrG ' '"' national agricultural meetings 

^ held in connection with the International 

Livestock Exposition and the National 4-H 
Club Congress. 

They are R. T. Grant, Snow Hill, Wor- 
cester county; L. C. Burns. Westminster. 
Carroll county; Mary Ethel Joy, Leonard- 
town. St. Mary's county; and R. G. Muel- 
ler, Elkton, Cecil county. 




Mr. Adkins 



Adkins President 

Lee Adkins. class of '42, was elected 
president of the Agriculture Alumni at the 
Homecoming day election. Lee is a native 
of the Eastern Shore, 
and has been active in 
alumni affairs since his 
graduation. He served 
as Vice President of 
the Ag Alumni last 
year. He is presently 
employed as Educa- 
tional Associate with 
the Automotive Safety 
Foundation with of- 
fices in Washington, 
D. C. Under Lee's 
leadership we can ex- 
pect the Agricultural 
Alumni Association to continue to be one 
of the most active and progressive groups 
of the University's Alumni. Important 
plans are already being developed for an 
outstanding spring meeting and banquet. 
The constructive program carried out by 
the Ag. Alumni Committees is to be con- 
tinued and expanded. The Memorial Com- 
mittees under the imaginative and dy- 
namic leadership of Dr. T. B. Symons 
has embarked on the inspiring and impor- 
tant project of planning and planting the 
"Memorial Garden" at the West end of 
the new University Chapel. A report of 
the Memorial committee follows. 

Memorial Garden 

At the Agricultural Alumni Board of 
Directors meeting at Rossborough Inn, 
Dr. Symons presented the proposal to 
undertake the planning and planting of a 
Memorial Garden surrounding the Uni- 
versity Chapel. The Board of Directors 
approved of the idea and it was formally 
presented to the Agricultural Alumni at 
their regular meeting on Homecoming day, 
October 25th. The Ag Alumni gave unan- 
imous approval to the plan and the com- 
mittee was immediately enlarged and be- 
gan active work toward making the pro- 
posal a reality. 

Dairy Team Ties 

The University's Dairy Products judg- 
ing team tied with the University of Geor- 
gia for first place in the Southern contest 
and placed eighth in the International con- 
test at Chicago. In the Southern states 
contest which was held at Nashville, Tenn., 
Maryland won first place in judging milk 
for which the team received a trophy. The 
team members were: Edgar A. Day, Noble 
P. Wong. Maija Vilums, and Neil Walters. 
Dr. W. S. Arbuckle and Thomas Fitz- 
patrick were coaches. Edgar Day was sev- 
enth high individual in judging milk at 
the International Contest; in the Southern 
contest he was second high individual in 
judging all products and second in milk 



361 



and third in judging cheese. Miss Maija 
Vilums was third high individual in judg- 
ing milk in the Southern contest. 

Technology Scholarships 

Three of the Dairy Products Judging 
hani members were among the four Uni- 
\ ersity students who were recently awarded 
scholarships for advanced study by the 
combined Dairy Technology Societies of 
Maryland and the District of Columbia 
at the Annual Banquet of the Eighth An- 
nual Dairy Technology Conference held 
at the University of Maryland. 

Recipients of the awards were: Miss 
Maija Vilums— $200, Edgar A. Day— $100, 
Noble P. Wong— $100 and J. Nelson Lang- 
don — $100. These Scholarships are awarded 
on the basis of leadership, scholarship, 
need, and past contributions to the field 
of Dairy Technology. 

On to Chicago 

Twenty-three Maryland 4-H club boys 
and girls won trips to the 1952 National 
4-H Club Congress in Chicago for out- 
standing achievements in leadership and 
agricultural and home economics projects. 
The winners represented 13 counties. The 
state winners were selected from nearly 
14.000 4-H Club members in Maryland 
and received their all expense trips through 
the generous donations of over 50 well- 
known industries and organizations. The 
Maryland delegates to the National Con- 
gress included several Maryland students. 

New Staff Members 

The editor of this column has tried to 
obtain a complete listing of the new addi- 
tions to the staff of the College of Agri- 
culture (including the Extension Service 
and Experiment Stations) since July 1952 
and has come up with the following list 
which is not guaranteed to be complete: 
Animal Husbandry Department 
Emory C. Leffel, Asst. Prof. An. Hus. 
(Replaces James Outhouse). 
Extension Service — State Staff 

Robert Bruce, Publication Editor; 
Janet Louise Coblentz, Nutritionist; 
Evelyn Byrd Hutcheson, Information 
Specialist. 
Botany Department 
John Keller, Asst. Prof. Plant Path- 
ology. 
Extension Service — County Staffs 
J. Edward Bullock, Negro County 
Agent, (Anne Arundel & Calvert); 
Charlotte Ann Conway, Asst. Home 
Demon. Agent, (Carroll county); Ella 
Fazzalari, Asst. Home Demon. Agent 
(Pr. Georges County); Loren March 
Hiddleson. Asst. County Agent, (St. 
Mary's); Ruth I. Johnson, Negro 
Home Demon. Agent (Montgomery); 
Judith Louise Messenger, Asst. Home 
Demon. Agent (Washington County); 
Charlotte Virginia Mitchell, Asst. 
Home Demon. Agent (Dorchester) ; 
William Merle Nixon, Asst. County 
Agent (Dorchester & Talbot); Imo- 
gene D. Romino, Asst. Home Demon. 
Agent (Baltimore County) : Betty 
Louise Wilson, Asst. Home Demon. 
Agent (Harford Count y). 
Horticulture Department 

Andy Duncan, Extension Specialist in 
Vegetable Crops. 



i 



Enjoyment, unLrntd. 






Enjoy the pleasure of matchless Maryland cuisine served in 

an atmosphere of gracious charm, or relax in the Lounge 

Bar, where a little check covers a lot of enjoyment. 

3heratonjBeH)EfJert 



LOUNGE BAR 
John Eager Howard Room 



Coffee Shop 




Reese Press 

PRINTERS 

301 E. LOMBARD ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



B»s» 



BfiflSS & COPPER SUPPLy CO., 

BRASS and COPPER PRODUCTS 



PHONE: LExington 4181 



109-11 Cheapside 



Baltimore 1, Md. 



Win a patronizing advertisers please mention "Maryland' 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLI AMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



R. MARS 

THE CONTRACT 
CO. 

Wholesale 

See Our Xmas Gift Line 

• Furniture • Carpets 

• Linens 

• Electrical Appliances 

For information on how YOU can 

shop here, write to 

L. R. MITCHELL, or phone 

Lincoln 4-6900 

410 FIRST ST., S.E. 

Washington, D. C. 



J\upertu3 
SHEET METAL 

Mechanical Contractors 

7337 Walker Mill Road 
Washington 19, D. C. 



W. R. HILL COMPANY 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Government Contracts 
Phone: NOrth 7-1313 



1313 - 13th STREET, 
WASHINGTON 5, 



N.W. 
D.C. 



HILLYARD SALES CO. 

FLOOR TREATMENT 

R. E. Ruby, Divisional Mgr. 

Terminal Bldg., 4th & D Sts., S.W. 

NA. 8-9515 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



Graduate School 



Self-Ignition of Materials 

DANIEL GROSS, now working on his 
Master's degree in Mechanical En- 
gineering at Maryland, contributed to re- 
cent investigations by the fire protection 
laboratory of the National Bureau of 
Standards, providing conclusive proof that 
closely packed fibrous materials can ignite 
by self-heating. 

In general, the effect of self-heating is 
small ; in some special cases, however, 
serious consequences may result if this 
effect is overlooked, particularly where 
materials packed in large stacks are in- 
volved. In one case, nine carloads of in- 
sulation fiberboard were shipped from a 
factory in the South, bound for New York 
State, before the heat of fabrication was 
completely dissipated. Seven days later 
one carload was discovered to be afire. 
The other eight cars when unloaded into 
an Army warehouse after 10 to 12 days 
on the road, were stacked in a single pile 
of more than 24,000 cu. ft. Four days 
later the warehouse and its contents were 
destroyed by fire, the loss amounting to 
2% million dollars. 

The Army asked the National Bureau 
of Standards to investigate whether self- 
heating could be carried to such an extent 
as to cause the material to ignite. 

Daniel Gross and A. C. Hutton of the 
NBS Fire Protection Section developed 
equipment and methods for studying self- 
heating characteristics over a wide range. 
More effective control of shipping and 
storing temperature and of stack size is 
therefore recommended to reduce the 
probability of ignition due to self-heating. 

Daniel Gross, NBS fire prevention engi- 
neer, received his B.M.E. degree in 1949 
from the Cooper Union School of Engi- 
neering. During the summer of 1948 he 
was a student aide in engineering at the 
Naval Research Laboratory, and from 1949 
to 1950 he was engaged in heat transfer 
research at the Heat and Mass Flow An- 
alyzer Laboratory of Columbia University. 
He belongs to the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, and 
Pi Tau Sigma. 

Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Dispenser 

A very simple method for automatically 
dispensing liquid nitrogen to vacuum-sys- 
tem traps and other vessels has recently 
been developed by Jesse Sherwood of the 
National Bureau of Standards. He is 
studying at Maryland for a Master's de- 
gree in physics. The new technique per- 
mits the maintenance of a liquid refrig- 
erant in a system for long periods of time 
without the use of an external source of 
compressed air. 

In most vacuum systems, the evacu- 
ated apparatus is kept free of contami- 
nating gaseous matter by trapping the 
vapors before they circulate throughout 
the system. A trap, filled with some re- 
frigerant such as dry ice or liquid nitrogen, 
is inserted into the svstem so that as the 



vapors pass over it, they condense and 
collect on the surface of the trap. How- 
ever, these refrigerants evaporate rapidly 
and hence must be replenished at regular 
intervals. The NBS dispenser automati- 
cally performs this task, keeping the trap 
filled to any predetermined level for a 
period of time dependent only on the 
available supply of liquid nitrogen. 

Jesse E. Sherwood, NBS physicist spe- 
cializing in microwave spectroscopy, re- 
ceived his B. S. degree in mathematics 
from the University of Pittsburgh in 1943. 
He has done graduate work in mathe- 
matics and physics at Ohio State Univer- 
sity and George Washington University 
and will receive his Master's degree in 
physics this year from the University of 
Maryland. Before coming to NBS, he was 
an instructor in mathematics at Brown 
University, did research in interior bal- 
listics for the Allegheny Ballistics Labora- 
tory, held a graduate assistantship at Ohio 
State University, was a teaching fellow in 
physics at George Washington University, 
did research in fluid dynamics in the Me- 
chanics Division of the Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory, and did research in molecular 
beams as a research associate in physics 
for the Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
He is a member of the American Physical 
Society, the Physical Society of Pitts- 
burgh, and Sigma Xi. He is the author of 
a paper on "A Remote-Control Method of 
Opening Ampoules of Active Materials." 



School of 



Law 



C. Kenneth Reiblich ' 2Q 

J. Francis Ireton 
I FRANCIS IRETON, (LLB, Law '29) 
J . a member of the law firm of Muecke, 
Mules and Ireton, was elected Chairman 
of the important Section of Corporation, 
Banking and Business Law of the Ameri- 
can Bar Association, at the annual meet- 
ing of the organization which was held in 
San Francisco. 

Mr. Ireton has been very active in the 
affairs of this Section for the past eight 
years, having successively served it as a 
member of its Council, Secretary and 
Vice-Chairman. 

This Section is the largest of the various 
Sections in the American Bar Association, 
having approximately 7.000 members, and, 
as indicated by its name, its activity em- 
braces practically the entire field of busi- 
ness and commercial law. 

It operates through several Divisions, 
each consisting of three or more commit- 
tees, for the purpose of considering cur- 
rent problems in the law relating to cor- 
porations and other kinds of business or- 
ganizations, banks and banking institutions, 
securities and finance, bankruptcy and re- 
organization, personal property security, 
general commercial subjects and in the 
field of food, drug and cosmetic law. 

Mr. Ireton also is currently Chairman of 
the Committee on the Proposed Uniform 
Commercial Code of the Maryland State 
Bar Association, and is a member of the 
Baltimore City Bar Association Committee 
on Commercial Law and Practice. 



38 



College of 



Military Science 



Air Force Vacancies 

POINTING out new opportunities for 
young men and women with scientific 
or technical interests to enter the Air 
Force for the purpose of receiving training 
as weather officers. General Hoyt S. Van- 
denberg. Air Force Chief of Staff, said, 
"We are desperately in need of good 
minds — young and flexible minds eager to 
meet the rising challenge of our times, 
anxious to grasp the evolving meaning of 
air power. . . ." 

Major General W. 0. Senter, Command- 
ing General of the Air Weather Service, 
stated: "We are witnessing an age of scien- 
tific developments which stimulate the 
imagination. In each day's news we hear 
of new advances in thermonuclear energy, 
supersonic speeds of aircraft, longer ranges 
for aircraft, and many other advances 
which were unfamiliar to us a few years 
ago. As science progresses, so must the 
meteorologist, since his contribution to the 
success of these scientific advances has in- 
creased materially since the beginning of 
the lasl war." 

College graduates, or seniors who will 
graduate this June, now may apply for 
appointment in the Air Force as second 
lieutenants and receive government-paid 
weather training at one of eight nationally 
known colleges and universities. Upon 
completion of their training, they will re- 
ceive assignments in the USAF Air 
Weather Service as weather officers. They 
must possess a baccalaureate degree with 
credit for one year of college physics and 
mathematics through integral calculus. 

Training for these officers in the grade 
of second lieutenants will begin in June 
1953 and again in September 1953. June 
1952 graduates will be considered for the 
latter class only. 

In Berlin 

Lieutenant Colonel George R. McLaugh- 
lin. (Mil. Sci. '52) has been appointed 
adjutant of Berlin Military Post. 

In military service since 1940, Colonel 
McLaughlin served successively as as- 
sistant adjutant general of the 31st Divi- 
sion; chief of the miscellaneous section of 
the Operations Division, European Thea- 
ter, and as chief of the Operations Divi- 
sion, United Kingdom Base in London 
before he was assigned to the Office of the 
Secretary of War in January 1946. 

Colonel McLaughlin went to Nanking 
in 1946 as adjutant general of the Com- 
bined Services Division, Military Advisory 
Group to China, serving through 1948. 
During this period, he was awarded the 
Order of the Cloud and Banner of the 
Chinese Nationalist Government and the 
Army Medal of the Chinese Armed Forces. 
He received his Washington assignment 
in 1949. His wife and two children will 
join him in Berlin. 

In Chicago 

Samuel Olanoff. (M.S. '52) has been 
appointed an instructor in physics at the 
University of Illinois' Chicago Undergrad- 
uate Division. 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

SANDE WILLIAMS and his or- 
chestra offer music that is an in- 
vitation to dance. Dinner from 
6; dancing from 9:30 p.m. 

Blue Room 

BARNEE conducts the famed 
Barnee-Lowee Orchestra for your 
dancing pleasure. Dining from 
7 p.m. Floor show 10 p.m. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CAIVERT WfljSJI 

;rvations: AOams 4-0700 



Reservations 




/HuHZCft 7n*de TVeM 



BEST 

DEALS 

EVER 



AT 



WHEELER 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH DEALER 



INC. 



HOME of the WHEELMOBILE 
Useful ONE-OWNER CARS 



ENTIRE 4800 BLOCK WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 




Phones - RAndolph 6-2231-6-2276 . . . TUckerman 2-2966 

BRIGHTWOOD 
AUTO BODY WORKS, Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE METAL PAINT, TRIM AND GLASS WORKS 
5917 Georgia Ave., N.W. Washington 11, D.C. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 



Link Belt Company 
Power Transmission < 

Supplies 
1244 NINTH STREET N.W. 



"Pyrene" & 
"C-O-TWO" 4 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 1, D.C. 



"MSA" Industrial 
Gas Masks, Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 

HUdson 3-4430 



JACK MULLANE 

714- 11th STREET, N.W. 
MEtropolilan 8-939S Washington, D.C. 



FOR HIRE 

Tuxedos - Full Dress - Cutaways - Caps 

Gowns - Hoods - Masquerade 

Costumes - Wigs - Theatrical 

Make-Up Supplies 



39 



CAPITOL 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 



GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 

Phone - - 
CAtonsville 2589 



1 SO. BEACHWOOD AVE. 

CATONSVILLE, MD. 



"Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 



TRISTATE 



flSTOWNGW 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS • SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 



OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 Pulaski Highway 
Baltimore, Md. 



College of 

Business & Public 

Administration 

^^^^^^^^ Egbert F. Tingley '27 



With Aetna Life 

ROBERT C. RICE '41 has moved to 
Baltimore as Supervisor for the Aetna 
Life Insurance Company. He will have 
responsibility for building the agency in 
this area and is very much interested in 
any alumnus who would like this work 
and whose age is in the vicinity of 30 
years. Bob's address is 19 South Street, 
Baltimore 2. Md. 

While in school, Bob was Editor of the 
1940 yearbook. President of the Senior 
class, Vice-President of ODK, Secret a ry- 
Treasurer of the Inter-Fraternity Council 
and a member of Phi Sigma Kappa Fra- 
ternity. Since graduation he has served 
as a Personnel Manager in Newark, New 
Jersey, and established an insurance office 
in Hagerstown, Maryland. 

In Oklahoma 

L. D. Simmons '23 recently opened law 
offices at 910 South Boston in Tulsa, Okla- 
homa. 

At Reese AFB, Texas 

William F. Crawford, Jr., (BPA '51) 
Aviation Cadet, is a student in the USAF 
Base Pilot School (ME) at Reese .Air 
Force Base, Tex. 

He came to Reese from Greenville AFB, 
Miss., where he completed the primary 
phase of the pilot training course. At 
Reese he will learn to fly the TB-25 Mit- 
chell Bomber and next February, upon 
successful completion of his present course, 
will be commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the Air Force Reserve with the silver 
wings of an Air Force pilot. 

A/C Crawford, a veteran of 30 months 
in the United States Navy, entered the 
Air Force in 1951, and was stationed at 
Boiling AFB. Washington, when he was 
accepted for pilot training. In civilian 
life he was employed as an insurance 
underwriter. 

To Board of Trustees 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, head of the 
Department of Government and Politics, 
has been named a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Westminster Choir College, 
Princeton. N. J. 

At Mississippi 

Mr. J. Vv. Cocke. President of the Mis- 
sissippi Society of Certified Public Ac- 
countants, was initiated as an honorary 
member of the Alpha Theta Chapter of 
Beta Alpha Psi, national accounting fra- 
ternity. 

Professor S. M. Wedeberg, Grand Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of Beta Alpha Psi, Profes- 
sor of Accountancy at University of Mary- 
land, and Treasurer of the Maryland So- 
ciety of Certified Public Accountants, pre- 
sented the honorary certificate to Mr. 
Cocke at the fall meeting banquet of the 
Society, held at the University of Mis- 
sissippi. 



Heads Business Organization 

Dr. John H. Frederick, professor of 
transportation and foreign trade, has been 
made head of the Department of Business 
Organization. 

Return to Campus 

Dr. Howard Wright and Mr. Charles 
T. Sweeney, professors of accounting, have 
returned to the campus after leaves of 
absence serving in government agencies 
during the past year. 

In Annapolis 

Dr. J. Allan Cook, Professor of Market- 
ing, addressed the Farm Bureau Insurance 
Companies in Annapolis on "Management's 
Job in Increasing Productivity." 

In Nashville 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette and Dr. Elmer 
Plischke. both of the Department of Gov- 
ernment and Politics, attended the con- 
ference of the Southern Political Science 
Association in Nashville. Tennessee. Dr. 
Burdette was chairman of the program 
committee. Dr. Plischke spoke on "Post- 
war Political Parties in German}'." 

At Munich 

Richard J. Harrington, who attended 
B&PA '50- '51, recently graduated from the 
Seventh Army's Non-Commissioned Offi- 
cers Academy at Munich, Germany, a six- 
week course in the techniques of combat 
leadership and infantry tactics in the field. 
Students were carefully selected. 

Harrington, a member of Battery A of 
the 74th Armored Field Artillery Battal- 
ion, arrived in Europe in April 1951. He 
has been awarded the Army of Occupation 
Medal. 

Journalism and P. R. 

The Department of Journalism and 
Public Relations' class enrollment has in- 
creased 57 percent in the past year. The 
number of majors in the Department's 
two major sequences has increased 22 per- 
cent in the same period. The public re- 
lations major sequence has entered its 
second year. Maryland's offerings in pub- 
lic relations have recently been favorably 
commented upon in Public Relations News, 
and an article by Prof. Krimel describing 
the visiting lecturer system used in the 
Department's public relations classes has 
appeared in Public Relations Journal. 

The number of public relations major 
students increased by about 92 percent 
during the first year in which the new 
sequence was offered. 

Last fall the department took over vir- 
tually all of building GG, in which it had 
formerly had one wing. The student pub- 
lications were moved from the Recreation 
Hall to GG, and a journalism library, 
stocked mainly with newspapers and peri- 
odicals for the present, was set up. The 
campus radio station, WMUC, also was 
moved to GG. 

Among equipment items now being used 
in GG are an Associated Press newspaper 
wire receiver and a United Press Radio 
receiver. 

To New York 

Profs. Alfred A. Crowell and Donald W. 
Krimel, served on panels at national con- 
vention in New York, of the Association 
for Education in Journalism. Prof. Crow- 



40! 



ell headed a panel on industrial journal- 
ism ; Prof. Krimel was a member of the 

panel on public relations, of which he had 
been chairman the preceding year. 

Prof. Crowell also served as chairman 
of a Maryland Press Association editorial 
clinic The group engaged in a discussion 
of freedom of information, and later ap- 
proved a resolution presented by Prof. 
Crowell. The resolution was in advocacy 
of a state-wide statute in Maryland pro- 
viding that governing bodies of political 
.subdivisions in the state hold their delib- 
erations in public. 

In Norfolk, Vo. 

Charles K. Marshall, - 50. and Charles W. 
Puffenbarger. '51. started out on separate 
paths after leaving the Department of 
Journalism and Public Relations, but they 
now form a solid Terrapin core on the 
editorial staff of the Norfolk Virginian- 
Pilot. Marshall covers City Hall, schools, 
and general assignments, while Puffen- 
barger has the maritime and labor news 
beats. 

Al Donegger's Class 

A course in press photography was made 
available in the Department of Journalism 
and Public Relations for the first time in 
the Fall. 1952. The S8.000 investment in 
facilities and equipment will handle a por- 
tion of the flood of students who are inter- 
ested in the field. University Photographer 
Alfred Danegger is the instructor. 

In addition to the press photography, 
new courses added to the curriculum this 
academic year in the Department are one 
in Community Journalism, taught by Prof. 
Alfred Crowell. and one in the Public Re- 
lations of Government, offered by Prof. 
Donald Krimel. 

Zogorio Returns 

Sam Zagoria, Washington Post reporter, 

has re-joined the staff of the Department 

of Journalism and Public Relations as 

lecturer to the reporting and editing classes. 

Office Conference 

"Your Responsibility in Supervision and 
Training of Office Employees" was the 
Conference theme discussed by manage- 
ment authorities in the Fifth Annual Office 
Management Training Conference to be 
held at the University. 

This Conference was organized and con- 
ducted in cooperation with the Chapters 
of Area II of the National Office Man- 
agement Association. Professor Arthur S. 
Patrick was in charge. 

The Conference opened with a luncheon 
meeting with President H. C. Byrd as 
speaker. Other speakers included Mr. 
Dwight P. Jacobus, supervisor of voca- 
tional-industrial education of the Depart- 
ment of Education of the State of Mary- 
land; Dr. William Polishook. director of 
business education at Temple University, 
Philadelphia; Mr. Harry W. Nock, con- 
trol manager of the employee relations 
department of DuPont de Nemours and 
Company; and Mr. Lincoln Atkiss, train- 
ing director of the Atlantic Refining Com- 
pany, Philadelphia. 

Conferences were open to office man- 
agers, executives, and supervisors as well 
as to students majoring in business ad- 
ministration. 







"■■■■■I 



^Af Friendship 

International 
Airport 

Where 

Discriminating Baltimoreans Gather 

for luncheon or dinner — for banquets, receptions or any 
social function. You will be enchanted with the atmos- 
phere . . . delighled with the superb cuisine. 




DINING ROOM 

BANQUET HALL 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
COFFEE SHOP 




AL GREEN ENTERPRISES 

Ample Free Parking 



V 



1899 Fifty-three Years of Fine Printing 1952 

PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS ENGRAVERS 

Phone: SAratosa 6560 
40-42 SOUTH PACA ST. BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



THE HOME OF 7 HOUR SERVICE 

DRIVE-IN 




■ r -74 PULASKI HIGHWAY AT ERDMAN AVEN 

BRoadway 6600 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING, FUR STORAGE, RUG CLEANING 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



41 



THE 
TOWN HOUSE 

ONE OF THE 

UNIQUE EATING 

PLACES IN THE 

COUNTRY- 
FAMOUS FOR 
FOOD IN THE 
MARYLAND 
TRADITION 

Howard & 22nd Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
HOpkins5191 



The 



Maurice 
Leeser Co, 



i PRINTERS 
I PUBLISHERS 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 



536 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 
SAratoga 4446-4447 

In Our Second Generation 
of Quality and Service 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 



TILE 



TERRAZZO 
MARBLE 

A. F. Pizza 



SLATE 



PL 3554 911 E. Pratt St. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Since 1866 

Euex 287 Baltimore, Md. 



College of 



Home Economics 

Mary Speake Humelsine 'jq 
Mrs. Joseph Longridge ' 2Q 



Annual Meeting 

THE annual meeting of the Home Eco- 
nomics Alumni Association was held 
on Saturday morning, October 25th. 

In the absence of Hazel Tuemmler, 
Chairman of Tray and Basket Sales. Mary 
Humelsine reported that some plan for 
increasing sales should be worked out and 
suggested setting up several places around 
the state where more people could have 
access to the trays. 

The Board of Directors recommenda- 
tion that the Constitution be amended to 
provide for the offices of Corresponding 
Secretary and Treasurer was adopted. 

The Chairman read a letter from Dave 
Brigham requesting that all Associations 
change their annual meetings from fall to 
spring. The motion was made and carried. 

Elected were the following officers: 

President, Mary Langford; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mary Humelsine; Recording Secre- 
tary, Hilda Nystrom ; Corresponding Sec- 
retary, Louise Bowen; Treasurer, Hazel 
Tuemmler; Co-Editors, Katherine Long- 
ridge; Maryland Magazine, Mary Speake 
Humelsine. 

Home Economics Alumni attending Fall 
Homecoming : 

Curry Nourse England, 209 Forest Ave., Rock- 
ville ; Joan Ricketts Moore, 1145 Courtney Road, 
Baltimore 27 ; Ada Peers, 4515 Amherst Lane, 
Bethesda 14 ; Louise Richardson Bowen, 4401 
Sheridan St., Hyattsville ; Agnes McNutt Kricker, 
Sandy Spring ; Geraldine Parry Edwards, Hy- 
attsville ; Mary Speake Humelsine, 6512 Western 
Ave., Chevy Chase 15 ; Lucille Traband, 4006 
Oglethorpe St., Hyattsville ; Phyllis Chase, 435 
Raymond St., Chevy Chase 15 ; Ruth Wiles, 31 
Chandler Rd., Chatham, N. J. ; Marjorie Miller 
Knust, 818 C St., Sparrows Point ; Vera K. 
Woods, 4003 Quintana St., Hyattsville: Mary 
Wells Roberts, c/o Col. Roberts, G3, Sec. Hqs. 
7th Army, APO 46, New York, N. Y. ; Francis 
Camalier Ryan, 4312 Kaywood Dr., Mt. Rainier; 
Louise Burke Cousey, 6106 Parkway Dr., Balti- 
more 12 ; Dianne Lura Pruett, Rt. 1, Box 107, 
Bluefield, W. Va. ; Charlotte Mitchell 209 Belve- 
dere Ave.. Cambridge ; Mary Riley Langford, 
4006 Hartwich Rd., College Park ; Ellen Pratt 
Pusey, Rt. 2, Snow Hill ; Anne R. Ward, 3831 
Porter St. NW, Washington 16 ; Josephine 
Hughes, 4556 Wells Pkwy., Riverdale ; Helen 
Beyerb Habeb, 211 Morris Ave., Mountain Lake, 
N. J. ; Olive Edmonds Carr, 305 Reading Ave., 
Rockville; Lorien Broadwater Sween, 5814 Kings- 
wood Rd., Bethesda ; Katherine Appleman Long- 
ridge, 7303 Dartmouth Ave.. College Park ; Ruth 
Dubb, 420 N. Patterson Park Ave., Baltimore ; 
Shirley Bennett Schafer, Bowie; Jessie Mun- 
caster Richardson, 4206 53 Ave., Bladensburg ; 
Ruth Snyder Mclntish, 4107 Claggett Rd., Col- 
lege Heights ; Hilda Nystrom, 4400 Holly Hill 
Rd., Hyattsville ; Felisa Jenkins Bracken, 500 Vir- 
ginia Ave., Catonsville 28 ; Carolyn Young Null- 
inix. 2409 Essex Rd., Richmond 28 ; Peggy Ald- 
ridge, 38 W. College Ave., Frostburg ; Sue Klosky 
McMahon, 2700 Que St.. NW, Washington : Rhea 
Galloway, College Park ; Margaret Galloway, 
Route 2, Ridgewood, N. J. ; Carolyn Chesser Cop- 
pinger, 8574 Locust Hill Rd., Bethesda. 

Felisa Bracken Wins 

Felisa J. Bracken '31 received the Lydia 
J. Roberts Essay Award of $500.00 at the 
National Convention of the American Die- 
tetic Association in Minneapolis, the sub- 
ject of which was "Infant Feeding Prac- 
tices in the American Colonies". The con- 
test was open to all majors in Institution 
Management and Dietetics in American 
colleges as well as to graduate students and 
members of the Association. 

Mrs. Bracken is an alumnus of the 
University of Maryland. She is with the 
Department of Welfare in Baltimore, and 



is a member of the American Dietetic 
Association and the Maryland Dietetic 
Association. The Maryland Dietetic Asso- 
ciation is very proud that one of its mem- 
bers received the first Lydia J. Roberts 
Award. 

Farm Queen 

Betty Jean Endslow, glockenspielist with 
the University Band, also performs on the 
marimba and piano and has appeared on 
the Paul Whiteman Talent Show. 

The former Maryland Farm Queen was 
State Grand Champion Food Judge and 
Demonstrator. 

The 18-year-old Home Economics sopho- 
more, from Forest Hill, was selected to 
play her marimba on the Paul Whiteman 
show. 

"I was so nervous and excited, but most 
of all I was surprised to see this happening 
to me," she recalled. Later she appeared on 
the Bailey Goss Talent Show. 

Her marimba talent comes from six 
years of practice contemporaneous with 
activity in 4-H Club work. She divides 
her extra-curricula time at Maryland be- 
tween the Band and the campus 4-H Club. 
As a 4-H member, she was a state and 
county Tribe leader before winning the 
Farm Queen title. 

Textiles and Clothing 

Miss T. Faye Mitchell, head of the De- 
partment of Textiles and Clothing, at- 
tended the sixth Eastern Conference of 
College Teachers of Textiles and Clothing 
at Woman's College, Greensboro, N. C. 
While there Miss Mitchell attended the 
International Textile Exhibition. 

Miss Eileen Heagney has just joined the 
staff of the Department of Textiles and 
Clothing. She was previously affiliated 
with the Butteiick Pattern Company. 

To Roanoke 

Dean Marie Mount attended the Con- 
ference on Local Health Services in Ro- 
anoke, Virginia, as one of the Maryland 
representatives appointed by Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin. 

Vice-Chairman of the Prince Georges 
Planning Council's Health Committee, 
Miss Mount participated in this Regional 
health conference convened by Governor 
John S. Battle of Virginia. William H. 
Evans, Health Committee Chairman ex- 
plained that the Conference included rep- 
resentatives from North Carolina, Virginia, 
West Virginia, District of Columbia, Ken- 
tucky, as well as Maryland. The purpose, 
he said, is to bring together citizen lead- 
ers for a two and a half day work session 
on questions related to obtaining better 
community health services. 

Wins Roberts Award 

Felisa Jenkins Bracken, (Home Ec '31) 
was honored during the 35th annual meet- 
ing of the American Dietetic Association 
at Minneapolis when she received the 
Lydia J. Roberts Essay Award for 1952 
for the outstanding essay on the history of 
child nutrition. 

Mrs. Bracken, who was born in the Phil- 
ippine Islands. While majoring in nutri- 
tion at Mills College she was a teaching 
fellow. 

Her dietetic internship was taken at the 
Army Medical Center, Walter Reed, 



[42] 



Washington. She was a therapeutic die- 
titian at the University Hospital before 
assuming her present position as home 
economist for the department of public 
welfare, Baltimore. 

Articles by her have appeared in Mod- 
, rn Hospital and The Child magazines. 
With her husband, Charles Oliver Bracken, 
and their two young sons, she resides in 
Catonsville. 

In addition to the American Dietetic 
Association. Mrs. Bracken is affiliated with 
the American Home Economics Associa- 
tion, Omicron Xu. Phi Kappa Phi. and 
Mortar Board. 

In Coast Guard 

Thomas S. Mallonee, (H. Ec. '52) has 
been commissioned Ensign, U. S. Coast 
Guard Reserve, after successful comple- 
tion of an intensive four month course at 
the Coast Guard Academy, New London. 

He enlisted in 1952. and qualified im- 
mediately for ROCS. 

Busy Gal 

One of the busiest girls on campus is 
Nancy Richardson, senior in Home Ec. 

Since she transferred to Maryland from 
the University of Rochester in 1950. Mrs. 
Richardson has been as active on campus 
as she has been in maintaining over a 3. 
scholastic average. 

Tapped for Mortar Board last May Day 
festivities, she is also a member of Omi- 
cron Xu. Home Ec honorary. 

Mrs. Richardson waited a long time to 
get to college because, first, she put her 
husband. Rick, through his second degree 
in accounting. 

Among Mrs. Richardson's various ac- 
tivities are work on the Diamondback, 
WSSF, Red Cross, Campus Chest drive, 
Freshman Orientation Committee, histor- 
ian and secretary of the Business Educa- 
tion Club, and membership in the Federal 
Arts Club. 

She has also participated in the May 
Day Planning Committee, the Canterbury 
Club. Junior Prom Committee, Squadron 
Sponsor and Division Sponsor for AF- 
ROTC, Chairman of invitations for the 
annual Military Ball, and fraternity editor 
of the 1952 "M" Book. 

In addition she has served as social 
chairman of Mortar Board, chairman of 
Mortar Board's yearly mum sale, and so- 
cial chairman for Alpha Xi Delta. 

Mrs. Richardson designs and makes her 
clothes, practices interior decorating, and 
knits sweaters for the Red Cross. 




SMOT KEED, WOT? 

"Lissen. Kris! Before we get too far out on 
the limb, what's the income tax on gifts?" 



I 



srmpin 



^O/-, 



Wei 



h <'::>^ 



c %, 



e 



fulh 



se r 



W C€ 



' yc °mf< 



,e/ Or ( 



°'-%- 



9e sfh 



°^oA 



4nd 



or fi 



w °rld 



°te/ 



<*/ e 



^O/s 



'" *ok 



Ur »m 



re C( 



ro 



5, 



<*k 



9o Q< j 



' e W/, 



om s 



<fe/; 



"»o 



re 



'y> th 



and 



: 9ht. 



"t?o 



re Q , 



r eth 



' s °nf ( 



ey '**fc 



5(J f>erb 



e '>/>< 



h 






mmondh 



lo 



un 



9> 





PRODUCTS CO. 

BUSH, RIDGELY, BAYARD STS. 8 B.aO.R.R. 
BOX 1997 

Baltimore- (3) 



" We Know How" 

FABRICATED 
STRUCTURAL 
ORNAMENTAL 
REINFORCING BARS 

FOR 

BUILDERS 

MULBERRY- 4110 



The 
WALKER-HASSLINGER 

RESTAURANT A COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

SERVING FINE FOODS FOR OVER HALF CENTURY 

1701-05 N. Charles St., Baltimore 

Closed Mondays Near Penn. Station 



Open noon 'til II p.m. 



VE 9410 




43 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 

Heating 

Ventilating 

Plumbing 

Air Conditioning 

• 
Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 

1240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



JOHN H. DAVIS 

COMPANY 

* 

Paint Contractor 

* 

Phone Lincoln 3-2337 

1019 G STREET, S.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D.C. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half Street, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



^crjrafit'a Cijocolatts 

Distributor — 

Edward Zupnik fir Sons 

1307 Fourth St., N.E. 
Li. 4-6166 Washington, D.C. 



School of: 



Medicine 

Dr. John Wagner f j8 



MEMBERS of the University Depart- 
ment of Obstetrics who participated 
in the 46th annual meeting of the South- 
ern Medical Association at Miami, Florida, 
included Dr. Louis H. Douglass, who read 
a paper entitled "Trial Forceps" at the 
Dade County (Florida) Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Society ; Dr. J. Morris Reese, 
a member of the Council of the Southern 
Medical Association, who attended the 
business meetings of that body; and Dr. 
John E. Savage, who read a paper in the 
Section on Obstetrics. The subject of Dr. 
Savage's paper was "The Management of 
the Third Stage of Labor." 

With Monsanto 

Dr. Edward Orban (Med. Sch. Ph.D. 
'44 chemistry) of Monsanto Chemical 
Company's Mound Laboratory has been 
appointed chief of the research division's 
technical information section at Miamis- 
burg, Ohio. 

Orban, formerly of Buffalo, N. Y., joined 
the Mound Laboratory staff in 1946 and 
has been a group leader since 1948. He 
is a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Sigma 
Xi honorary societies and also is a mem- 
ber of the American Chemical Society 
and the Electrochemical Society. 

With Marines 

Lt. (jg) Howard Lee Seabright, Medical 
Corps, U.S.N. , School of Medicine, '44, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, is on duty at the Med- 
ical Center, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, 
San Diego, Cal. His duties include the 
treatment of Marine Korean veterans as 
well as recruits and permanent personnel. 



Sez Testudinette: 

AW O M A N says 
she's been shop- 
ping when she hasn't 
bought a thing for the 
same reason a man 
says he's been fishing 
when he hasn't caught 
a thing. At the pres- 
ent divorce rate some- 
one should publish 
"Who's Whose." 
Women run thru a 
wolf's mind because 
they're afraid to walk. 
Don't question your 
wife's judgement — 
she married you. Nobody takes the 
joy out of life as fast as the per- 
son who qualifies his praise with a 
"but." Those who blow the coals in the 
quarrels of others, have no right to com- 
plain if the sparks fly in their faces. When 
a man begins by saying, "Of course it's 
none of my business, but — " he's going to 
?nake it his business. 




school teachers! — 

The Standard 
Duplicator 

Is ESSENTIAL For 

Modern Instruction 

No Ink! No Stencil! 

No Gelatin! 

Phone — NAtional 8-4262 

STANDARD 

DUPLICATING 

MACHINES 

AGENCY 

1737 DeSales St., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



SELF -XM AS 

PRESENT 

that will be "tops" 

in Morris A. Bealle's greatest sports 
book— KINGS OF AMERICAN FOOT- 
BALL. The thrilling, entertaining, en- 
lightening story of the greatest college 
football team of all time, the 1951 Mary- 
land Terrapins and their 60 forerunners 
— all the way back to 1890. Gives the 
teams, games and players of your student 
days, profusely illustrated. Only $4.00; 
extra copies $3.00. Send check, money 
order or currency to — 

Columbia Publishing Co. 
Box 1623-B, Washington, D. C. 



9 



A 



»> 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



ENJOY OUR DELICIOUS FOOD 

PIZZA 

Our Specialty 
1837 M. STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Off Connecticut Avenue 



Multigraphing 
Addressing 



Mineographing 



Multilithing 
Mailing 



Ace Letter Service 

Phone: Na 8-7927 
1424 K St. N.W. Washington, D. C. 



44! 




By LOUISE LONGANECKER 



First Chapel Wedding 

ALBERT E. STOTT, of Hyattsville a freshman in the College of Agriculture, look 
Helen Ann Bump as his bride in the first wedding ceremony to be performed in the 
new Memorial Chapel. Reverend Jesse Myers officiated at the wedding, which took place 
it 2 p.m. Thanksgiving Day. Thursday, November 27. in the West Chapel. 




x r 



djloiiom f arade 



Buck — Moore 

ELEANOR MANNING MOORE to 
Donald M. Buck, both Maryland 
alumni. 

Colbourn — Howell 

Martha Byrd Howell, Maryland alumna, 
to Joseph L. Colbourn, Loyola graduate. 

Cooper — Diamond 

Dorothy Helene Diamond. Maryland 
alumna, to Burton M. Cooper. 

Clemments — Blunt 

Jane Kathryn Blunt. Nursing '50, to 
Raymond L. Clemments. on May 3, 1952. 

Deckelboum — Jacobs 
Louann Jacobs, Maryland, Alpha Epsi- 
lon Phi, to Nelson Dcckelbaum. B.S.. LL.B, 
Georgetown, Phi Delta. 

Ensor — Greiner 

Helene Louise Greiner to Charles O. 
Ensor, both Maryland alumni. 

Fontono — Reavis 

Margaret Louise Reavis, Benjamin 
Franklin, to Emanuele Fontana, Maryland, 
Lambda Chi Alpha and Delta Pi. 

Fleishell — McDonough 

Elaine McDonough, Maryland alumna, 
to George A. Fleishell. 

Fargoson Lloyd 

Doris G. Lloyd, Nursing '36, to Lt. J. C. 

Fargason. 

Flanigon Stull 

Helen Virginia Stull, Nursing '49, to John 
F. Flanigan, on May 24, 1952. 

Hennegon Eselhorst 

Betty Jane Eselhorst, Nursing '48, to 
2nd Lt. Joe E. Hennegan, on Sept. 6, 1952. 

Heimberger — Gray bill 

Caroline Mae Graybill, Susquehanna 
University alumna, to George J. Heim- 
berger, Maryland alumnus. 

Hewitt — Aiello 
Jacqueline Marie Aiello, Maryland 
alumna. Alpha Xi Delta, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Caesar L. Aiello, Hyattsville, to 
George L. Hewitt, Maryland graduate who 
served in the Navy in World War II. 



Jacobs — Thompson 

Eleanor Mae Thompson. Maryland 
alumna, to Alvin L. Jacobs, USAF. 

King — Miller 

Jane Catherine Miller. Wilson College. 
Chambersburg, Pa., to John L. King, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Koutsandreas — Jalepes 

Katherine Jalepes, Maryland alumna, to 
John D. Koutsandreas, American Univer- 
sity. 

Kraus — Warfield 

Elizabeth Snowden Warfield. Nursing 
'52, to Louis H. Kraus. Jr., on June 28, 1952. 

Miller — Lubinski 

Sophia Ann Lubinski, Nursing '36. to 
Leighton Miller, on June 14. 1952. 

Morgan — Lutz 

Anne Caroline Lutz. Nursing '46. to 
Sergeant Charles G. Morgan, USAF on 
August 9th. 1952. 

McCarl — Mooney 

Both Maryland alumni, Clayton S. Mc- 
Carl to Jane Drury Mooney. The groom 
attends the School of Dentistry. 

McLoin Young man 

Shirley Louise Youngman, Maryland 
alumna, to George H. McLain, Jr., Mary- 
land student. 

Moreland — Mason 

Joan Lorraine Mason to William P. 
Moreland, Jr., Maryland student. 

Mc Doug a I Gilbert 

Jane Gilbert, Carleton alumna, to 
Charles A. McDougal, Maryland alumnus. 

Mariner — LeGrande 

Cosma Mary LeGrande to Lieutenant 
Richard R. Mariner, USAF, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Morris — Lumpkin 

Martha Roane Lumpkin to John L. 
Morris, connected with Maryland's Ex- 
tension Service. 

Moyle — Hudson 

Vivian Cecilia Hudson to Edward A. 
Mo3'le, Maryland alumnus. 

Nichols — Gasser 

Helen Martha Gasser, Nursing '48, to 
James P. Nichols, on June 28, 1952. 

O'Donnell — Deutermonn 

Frances Louise Deutermann to James 
M. O'Donnell, Maryland alumnus. 



do it now . . . 
WIRE Home 

HOLIDAY FLOWERS 

from 




Order your Christmas fresh 
flowers now to assure out-of- 
town holiday delivery. We do 
all the details and speed your 
gift via Florists' Telegraph De- 
livery Association. 

SILVER SPRING 

Ellsworth Drive near Fenton 

JU. 7-7100 

WASHINGTON 

1212 F St., N.W., NA. 8-4276 

5016 Conn. Ave., EM. 3-1225 

SHIRLINGTON 

2812 So. Randolph St., 

OV. 3-0700 



Frank M. 
Dorsey & 
Sons, Inc. 

HEATING 

PLUMBING 

AIR CONDITIONING 

Phone: LAwrence 6-8070 

820 Michigan Ave., N.E. 
WASHINGTON 17, D. C. 



Our Specialty 

SCHOOL LETTERING 

BANNERS 

BOWLING SHIRTS 

905 EYE STREET, N.W. 
EX 3-1168 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof - Colorfast 

Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



45 



manufacturers of 
paints and 
varnishes 




INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL FINISHES 

AMERICAN 
PAINT PRODUCTS 

COMPANY, INC. 

PLANT & OFFICES 

1 108 ST., S.E., Li 3-8993 

WASHINGTON STORE 

49 H ST., N.W., ST 3-9582 



UNEXCELLED COCKTAILS 

Sweedish and 
American Foods 

Luncheon J J .30 - 2:30 

Smorgasbord or Dinner 4.-30 - J J .00 

Sunday 12:30 - 17.00 

Closed Mondays 

PRIVATE PARTIES UP TO 20 PERSONS 

2641 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
ADoms 4-9659 Washington 

Opposite Wardman Park Hotel 



Washington 

STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS 

ORNAMENTAL IRON • ALUMINUM 

STAINLESS STEEL • BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

P. H. OTTO, Prop. 

DUpont 7-7550 



Payne — Foster 

Patricia Ann Foster, Maryland alumna, 
daughter of Major General Eugene M. 
Foster, to Lieutenant Seth T. Payne, 
USNR, recently returned from Korea. He 
is a graduate of Kings Point Merchant 
Marine Academy and Georgetown Univer- 
sity. 

Pilkcrton — Saunders 

Francis C. Pilkerton, Maryland alumnus, 
to Lillian Olive Saunders, Petersburg Hos- 
pital School of Nursing. 

Pulverenti — Guido 

Dolores Marie Guido, Georgetown Visi- 
tation, to Don Pulverenti, Graduate School, 
Maryland. 

Reed — Lewis 

Mary E. Lewis. Nursing '48, to James 

D. Reed, on April 14. 1952. 

Renberger — Wickersham 

Maryland alumna La Melba Sue Wicker- 
sham. daughter of Representative Victor 

E. Wickersham of Oklahoma and Mrs. 
Wickersham, to Glen Renberger of La 
Crosse, Kansas. Bradley University grad- 
uate. 

Richardson — Davis 
Martha Lockwood Davis, graduate of 
Maryland, to Donald W. Richardson. 

Riley — Mueller 

Elfreda Mueller. Wausau, Wis., to Rob- 
ert A. Riley, M.D., Maryland, veteran of 
five years service, U.S.A.F. 

Scobill — Jackson 

Helen K. Jackson, who received her 
master of education degree at Maryland, 
to Thomas J. Scabill. Jr., Duke alumnus. 

Smith — Chosen 

Clarice Rae Chasen, Maryland alumna, 
Sigma Pi Sigma, to Robert H. Smith, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Snider — Bentz 

Alice Ruth Bentz, Maryland alumna, 
to Alfred E. Snider. William and Mary 
alumnus. 

Schmick — Isler 

Jeanette Isler, George Washington, to 
Frederick H. Schmick, Maryland. 

Schard — Zimmerman 

Phyllis J. Zimmerman, Nursing '50. to 
Charles B. Scharp, on June 28, 1952. 

Schmidt — Huchsoll 

Dorothy Huchsoll, Nursing '51, to Wil- 
liam R. Schmidt, on June 21, 1952. 

Trucker — Mc Nicholas 

Anne McNicholas, post-graduate stu- 
dent at Maryland's hospital, to Albert L. 
Trucker. Jr. 

White — Fitch 

Rollie H. White. Jr.. Maryland alumnus 
now with the State Department, to Doris 
Jean Fitch, George Washington. The 
groom served in counter-intelligence in 
the India-Burma Theatre and later as 
attache in Czechoslovakia. India and 
Egypt. 

Williams — Morrissey 

Margaret P. Morrissey, (A&S '46), Sigma 
Kappa to William B. Williams, George 
Washington Delta Tau Delta. They live 
in Flint. Mich. 



Wildberger — Witte 

Laura Lee Witte, Nursing '51, to Dr. 
Albert J. Wildberger. on June 7, 1952. 

Young — Welch 

Both Maryland alumni, Emalea Eliza- 
beth Welch to Lieutenant Andrew F. 
Young, Jr., USAF. 

Yang — Chang 

Catholic University, Dora Hsi-Chun 
Chang, Shanghai. China, to George Chao- 
Chih Yang, Maryland alumnus now attend- 
ing Grad School. 




JKinqi \Jn ZJneir Zringeri 



Arndt — Lamb 

SHIRLEY ANNE ARNDT to Donald 
K. Lamb, Maryland alumnus, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, now in pilot training in Texas. 

Barrington — Thomas 

Martha Jane Barrington to Lieutenant 
Richard C. Thomas, USAF, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Beiser — Weiner 

Beverly Ruth Beiser, Maryland alumna, 
to William E. Weiner. 

Brooks — Hall 

Mary Ann Brooks, Holton Arms School 
and Abbott Art School, to Charles C. Hall, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Byrne — Terry 

Patricia Eileen Byrne, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Harold F. ferry, Naval Medical 
Corps. 

Foster — Bolmer 

Diane Foster '53 A&S, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, to 2nd Lt, John Balmer, USAF, '52 
BPA, Phi Kappa Tau. 

Golomb — Boy If n 

Phyllis Golomb to Jerome Baylin, Mary- 
land, recently returned from Japan. 

Hartley — Warner 

Ruth Marion Hartley, Maryland alumna, 
to Lieut. William C. Warner, George Wash- 
ington. 

Hortmon — Rutherford 

Norma Jean Hartman. member of the 
Dance Masters of America, to William H. 
Rutherford. Maryland. 

Haas — Silesky 

Both from Maryland, Helen Joyce Haas, 
Alpha Epsilon Phi, to Morton O. Silesky, 
Sigma Alpha Mu. 

Hanson — Tupman 

Florence Marguerite Hanson, Maryland 
(Gamma Phi Beta), to Wilbur C. Tup- 
man. Georgia Tech and George Washing- 
ton (Sigma Nu), who served in the Navy. 

Horst — Hamilton 

Janet Anne Horst to Second Lieutenant 
John T. Hamilton, Jr., USAF, alumnus of 
Maryland's School of Law. 

Johnson — Gould 

Suzanne Johnson, Maryland alumna, to 
Maj. Harold E. Gould, U.S.A. 

Larsen — Jackson 

Marcia Larsen, KKG, Maryland sopho- 
more, to Jay Jackson, journalism senior. 



46 



Lilja — Smith 

Elaine Edith Lilja to Robert S. Smith, 
student at Maryland. 

Moc Murray Paul 

Kathryn MacMurray to William T. Paul. 
Maryland student. 

Morkham — Stevens 
Olga Burke Markham, Ft. Lauderdale. 
Fla.. to James A. Stevens, Maryland Alum- 
nus. 

Rothbloom — Stein 
Charlotte Irene Rothbloom to Joseph 
Stein, alumnus of Maryland. 
Roe — Lancaster 
Martha Gillespie Roe, Maryland alumna, 
to Henry C. Lancaster. Jr.. Virginia and 
Johns Hopkins. 

Schofer — Weber 
Alice Cresap Schafer, Maryland student, 
to Donald H. Weber, Maryland alumnus, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Shecter — Rosenthal 
Alice Esther Shecter, Phi Sigma Sigma, 
Maryland, to M. Leonard Rosenthal. Phi 
Sigma Delta. Johns Hopkins. 

Silverstein — Kolodner 
Rhoma Adrienne Silverstein. Maryland 
student, to Philip F. Kolodner. Jr. 
Smith — Delaway 
Charlotte McLean Smith to Lieutenant 
Samuel W. Delaway. Jr.. USX. Maryland 
alumnus. 

Weisman — Sin rod 
Harriet Weisman to Harold S. Sinrod, 
both Maryland alumni. 

Welsh — Coras 
Elizabeth Trundle Welsh to Theodore 
Cants, Maryland alumnus (Phi Beta Kappa 
and Phi Kappa Phi), school principal at 
Hillsboro, Va. 

Westrich — Diotz 
Norma Beverly Westrich, Phi Sigma Sig- 
ma, to Sylvan L. Diatz. Phi Alpha, both 
students at Maryland. 

Weaver — Eckard 
Helen Marie Weaver. American and 
George Washington Universities, to Lewis 
D. Eckard, Jr.. Maryland alumnus, Tau 
Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi. 
Wheeler — Ryan 
Both Maryland alumni. Ann Margaret 
Wheeler, Delta Delta Delta, to Paul A. 
Ryan. Alpha Tau Omega. Navy veteran. 
Williams — Robertson 
Emma Ellen Williams, Maryland alum- 
na, to James C. Robertson. 

Wittauer — Bernard 
Betty Ann Wittauer to John T. Ber- 
nard, Jr., student at Maryland. 



The Perfect 
Gift . . . 

YOUR PORTRAIT 

by 




JJon [jacjlii 

PORTRAIT & COMMERCIAL 

Custom Picture Framing 

STUDIO— 914 THAYER AVE. 

JU: 9-1517 Silver Sprins 



TIMBER 

IS A 
CROP 




The Harvest 

is 

HOMES 



GOOD LUMBER PROPERLY USED NEVER FAILS! 

SILVER SPRING 
III 1 1 IM \«p SUPPLY CO. 



Established 1922 



LUMBER 



MILLWORK 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 



Georgia Avenue and Ripley Street 
Silver Spring, Md. 




Restaurant Pierre 



It's Maryland with a French accent. 

A luxurious setting for leisurely dining 

or drinking, and a menu that rivals 

the best of La Belle France! 

Maryland's Only 
Truly Continental Restaurant 

704 N. HOWARD ST., BALTIMORE 
Closed Tues. Call Pierre for Reservations, LEx. 3506 



Barrett 
PARKER 



^r4air$tutist$ 



JUniper 5-3997 
JUniper 9-9804 



AIR CONDITIONED 

8406 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 



Clarke Instruments 

Div. of 
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MACHINE SHOPS, INC. 

Design • Development • Manufacturing 
Electronic Instruments 



919 JESUP BLAIR DRIVE 



SILVER SPRING, MD. 



[47 




BISSERT'S 

Bar and 
Restaurant 



Serving the 
finest in food and drinks 

PLAZA 9806 



Charles Street and Fort Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 



=* 



the moDtRn 

STfliioofiiy co. 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

PRINTING 
OFFICE FURNITURE 

17 S. Charles St. MU. 4377 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



J. HOWARD FRENCH 

for the Best 

Seeds Fertilizer 

Bulbs Insecticides 

Garden Equipment 

Baltimore Pike, Route 1 
Lima, Pa. 



PLaza 4821 

BLUMENTHAL-KAHN 
ELECTRIC CO., INC. 

Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures 

43 S. LIBERTY STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Service Between 
Baltimore - Washington - Annapolis 

Lexington 1756 
1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



Mention ''Maryland" when patronizing 
advertisers 



TERR0PINKI(\)5^ 



Cheer Leader '62 

REID TATUM is the latest arrival at 
the home of Maryland's head foot- 
hall coach and director of athletics. James 
M. Tatum and Mrs. Tatum. "Reid." the 
mother's middle name, is a 7 pound baby 
girl. 

The Tatum household includes James. 
Jr.. 5. and Becky. 7. 

Here's Jan Susan! 

Jan Susan Lawrence was born .Septem- 
ber 21. to Mr. & Mrs. I. Leslie Lawrence, 
Jr. The father graduated in '48 while 
Marvel Maxwell Lawrence finished Home 
Economics in '47. 

A son. James H. Ill was born last April 
25th to Mr. A- Mrs. James Potts. Dad 
was in the Class of 1950 Engineering. 

Little Brown Baby 

June Jacobs Brown (B.S. Ed. '48) and 
Earle W. Brown (Eng. '50) announce the 
birth of a baby girl. Denise MacBayne, 
(in August 2. '52. 

Nursing School Babies 

The School of Nursing reports new ar- 
rivals as follows : — 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Gooderich, a son, 
Peter Rhoades. on May 11, 1952. Mrs. 
Gooderich was Shirley R. Reynolds, Class 
1946. 

Captain and Mrs. Harold M. Taylor, a 
daughter, in April 1952. Mrs. Taylor was 
Doris E. Whale, Class 1945. 

Dr. and Mrs. R. C. Cloninger, a daughter, 
Stephanie Margaret, on March 6th, 1952. 
Mrs. Cloninger was Anne Hubner, Class 
1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Wroe, a daugh- 
ter, Nancy Ellen, on Feb. 12, 1952. Mrs. 
Wroe was Edith Ellen Viereck, Class 1950. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy S. Melvin. Jr.. a son, 
Blair Kent, on June 4, 1952. The Melvins 
have two other children, a son. Roy, III, 
four years old, and a daughter. Debby Ann, 
born December 10, 1950. Mrs. Melvin was 
Mae Rita Kent, Class 1946. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Montgomery, a 
daughter, Jayne Tracey, on Feb. 28, 1952. 
Mrs. Montgomery was Lorraine Brochiel, 
Cla.-s 1944. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Polite, a second 
son, Kim Michael, on April 21. 1952. Mrs. 
Polite was Barbara Kurz, Class 1943. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wilcox, twin 
daughters, Lisa Anne, and Lisbeth Anne, 
on July 3. 1952. Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox, also 
have a daughter, Julie Anne, born on Au- 
gust 15. 1950. Mrs. Wilcox was Anne 
Frazier, Class 1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Kaiserski, a 
daughter. Mary Beth, on February 12, 1952. 
Mrs. Kaiserski was Lois Steinwedel, Class 
1934. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Manley, a son, 
Michael Joseph, Jr. on February 18, 1952. 
Mrs. Manley was Mildred Jean Morne, 
Class 1949. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lee Justice, a 
son, Steven Lee, on April 17, 1952. Mrs. 
Justice was Dorothy May Meredith, Class 
1949. 



TORO'S 76" 

Professional Power Mower 

Used on Maryland's Campus 

and Many Other State and 

County Institutions 




COMPLETE LAWN & 

MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT 

From 18" to 76" 

CALL FOR DEMONSTRATION 
AUTHORIZED SERVICE DEPT. 

JUniper 7-7800 

NATIONAL 
CAPITAL TORO, Inc. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Dr. and Mrs. Donald Mintzer, a daugh- 
ter, Deborah Lee. on May 3, 1952. Mi-. 
Mintzer was Gladys Ellen Abshire, Class 
1945. 

Mr. anil Mrs. Maurice Joseph Gelpi, a 
son. Peter Maurice, on May 26, 1952. Mrs. 
Gelpi was Marguerite Elizabeth Looch, 
Class 1942. 

Dr. and Mrs. William Donald Hartsock. 
a son. James Charles, on June 25, 1952. 
Mrs. Hartsock was Nancy Jean Franklin. 
Class 1947. 

Dr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Jennings, a daugh- 
ter. Victoria Roberts, on July 22, 1952. 
Mrs. Jennings was June Winn, Class 1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Robert Duvall. a 
son. Robert Brion. on July 29. 1952. Mrs. 
Duvall was Dorothy Simpson, Class 1946. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Joseph Petrick. a 
son, Edward Joseph Jr.. on August 5, 1952. 
Mrs. Petrick was Mary Ann Michelitch, 
Class 1944. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jesse C. Staton. a daugh- 
ter. Carolyn Marie, on March 3. 1952. Mrs. 
Staton was Gertrude Marie Davis, Class 
1945. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brayton V. Danner, a son, 
David Winfield, on April 2. 1952. Mrs. 
Danner was Virginia Courtney Wicker, 
Class 1936. 

Lt. U. S. N. and Mrs. Michael Angelo 
lacona, a son, Michael Angelo. II. on Sept. 
15. 1952. Mrs. lacona was Charlotte Hal- 
ter. Class 1948. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bill Corpening, a son. Paul 
William, on Sept. 5, 1952. Mrs. Corpening 
was Avis Simons, Class 1944. The Corpen- 
ings have three boys and one girl. 



48 



®ap0 



John D. Davis 
JOHN DELAWDEE DAVIS, 27, Silver 
J Spring, died recently and was interred 
in Arlington National cemetery. He was 
a graduate of Maryland (Engr. '51) and 
worked as a civil engineer for the Dupont 
company in Delaware and Florida. In 
World War II lie was in the submarine 
service as a quartermaster second class. 
He belonged to Alpha Tail Omega fra- 
ternity. Survivors include his wife, Mar- 
garet; two sons, John and George; a 
brother, Robert; and his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Davis. 

Raphael Semmes 

Raphael Semmes, member of the Law 
School Class of 1915, died in Baltimore. 
Mr. Semmes was formerly curator of the 
Peale Museum, librarian of the Maryland 
Historical Society, and a one-time teacher 
of history at Johns Hopkins, Trinity Col- 
lege and the University of Virginia. He 
also served as editor of the Archives of 
Maryland, published by the Maryland His- 
torical Society. He gained national recog- 
nition as author of "Captains and Mar- 
iners of Early Maryland" and "Crime and 
Punishment in Early Maryland." 

Jacob N. Blumenthal 

Dr. Jacob N. Blumenthal 10 Dental, 
passed away recently. He was born on 
July 2, 1883 and had practiced in West 
Hartford, Conn. He is survived by his 
wife, Lee E. Blumenthal. 

John S. Strahorn 

John S. Strahorn, 76, (School of Law 
'03) senior member of the Anne Arundel 
County bar, died recently in Annapolis. 

Mr. Strahorn had been in private law- 
practice in Annapolis for 43 years, starting 
in Elkton, Md., after graduation. 

Born in Cecil County in 1876, he served 
as an infantry captain in World War I, 
and as lieutenant colonel, World War II, 
in the judge advocate general's office. 

He married the former Juliet Dexter 
of Annapolis in 1903. She died in 1950. 

He is survived by his second wife, Evan- 
geline M., and two sons by his first mar- 
riage, John S. Strahorn, Jr., professor at 
Maryland's School of Law, and Charles 
A. Strahorn of Winnetka, 111. Four grand- 
children also survive. 

Burial was in Arlington Cemetery. 

John E. Magers 

The Law Alumni are saddened by the 
death of John E. Magers, who had been 
their President from 1934 until 1947, the 
longest term of office of any president. 
Mr. Magers died in his seventieth year, 
on Sunday, August 31st, at the University 
Hospital, following a protracted illness. 
He was a native of Baltimore, received 
his education in the local public schools 
and was graduated from the Law School 
in 1914. In addition to his active interest 
in the Alumni Association of the Law 
School, he was a member of Sharon Lodge 
of Masons, the Druid Chapter of Scot- 
tish Rite, and Boumi Temple Shrine. He 
is survived by his widow, Mrs. Helen S. 




ORDER YOUR gfov&itattd 
EGG-NOG NOW 



87 



PER 
QUART 



ASK YOUR CLOVERLAND SALESMAN OR CALL LAFAYETTE 4920 



ow to buy a carpet • 

Yorkshire will measure the rooms to be carpeted and 
draw a floor plan of these rooms. We bring samples 
of ALL the famous brands and give you an accurate 
price on wall-to-wall carpeting or correctly fitted 
rugs. There is absolutely NO CHARGE for York- 
shire's Extra Services and you are under no obliga- 
tion to buy. 

l/lorhdkire 

•~S CARPET HOUSE 



<» <» 



RETAIL 



CONTRACT 



I Die wood 8400 

514 E. BELVEDERE AVENUE • BALTIMORE 12, MD. 



GOEB PRINTING CO. 

347 N. HOLLIDAY ST. 
PLaza 5675 Baltimore 2 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 
Phone VErnon 8400 
BALTIMORE, MD. 




CARROLL R. SENNER 

REPAIRING and REFINISHING 
Antiques & Fine Furniture 

1721 MARYLAND AVENUE MU. 5200 BALTIMORE 1 



49 



FAIRHAVEN 



DAIRY 

Serving the 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

OF BALTIMORE 



SYKESVILLE, MD. 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks & Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs & 

Davenports 

Filing Cabinets 

PLaza 4220 

THE 

JAMES T. VERNAY 

& SONS COMPANY 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



f 

^Uniforms 

— for Doctors, Nurses, Labo- 
ratory Technicians. Also Indus- 
trial and Domestic Uniforms. 

Franklin 

UNIFORM CO. 

In Baltimore: 235 Park Avenue 

In Washington: 906 Eleventh St., N.W. 
We Deliver! 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 
Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT ST. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



Mention "Maryland" when patronizing 
advertisers 



Magers, a son. John E. Magers, Jr.. and a 
sister. Miss Nellie M. Magers. 

Mr. Magers practiced law actively with 
his brother, Harry B. Magers, Class of 
1920, who had died just shortly before 
on June 8, 1952, and in recent years with 
his son, John E. Magers, Jr., Class of 
1938. The firm practice will be continued 
by John E. Magers. Jr. 

Harry B. Magers 

Harry B. Magers of the Law Class of 
1920 died on June 8 in Baltimore. He 
was in his sixty-sixth year at the time of 
his death and had long been associated 
with the law firm of Magers and Magers. 
His partner was John E. Magers, a past 
president of the Law Alumni who died on 
August 31. 

Charles Mitchell Barr 

Charles Mitchell Barr, '41 B.P.A., died on 
September 6 after an operation in Prince 
Georges General Hospital. Interment was 
in his birth place of Holyoke, Massachu- 
setts. He was manager of the Mill Order 
Department for the Stanford Paper Com- 
pany of Washington, where he had been 
since graduation with the exception of 
40 months of military service in England 
and Fiance. While he was a business ma- 
jor, he had a lively interest in entomology 
and his collection has been accepted as a 
memorial for permanent exhibit by the 
Holyoke Museum of Natural History and 
Art. A close associate and friend was 
George B. Vote, a University classmate 
and entomology major. News of Mr. Ban's 
passing came from his father. C. H. Barr. 

Joseph Henry Gollner 

Joseph Henry Gollner joins the honor 
roll of war dead from Maryland. A native 
of Salisbury, he was a member of the 
Class of 1948, Engineering, and left the 
University after one year to enter the U. S. 
Naval Academy. He was killed last Janu- 
ary in Korea while serving as a Pilot, 
stationed aboard the U.S.S. Essex. Lt. j.g. 
Gollner was the son-in-law of Congress- 
man John Wood (Dem.-Ga.), Chairman 
of the House Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee. He was a member of Sigma Chi 
and is survived by his wife Bobby and a 
daughter. 

Robert W. McAllister 

Robert W. McAllister, Silver Spring po- 
lice officer and ex-G.I. who was shot and 
killed by a narcotics addict, was formerly 
a Maryland student, attending B&PA, 
'48-'50. 

McAllister, who left a wife and nine- 
months old baby, was buried in Arlington 
National Cemetery. 

Funds are being raised for his survivors 
and contributions should be sent to the 
Suburban Trust Company's McAllister 
fund. Silver Spring. 

Charles Ruzicka 

Charles Ruzicka (School of Law '17) 
Baltimore attorney who had been a behind- 
the-scenes power in Maryland's Republican 
politics for many years, died in Baltimore 
recently. 

He was 56 and had been in ill health for 
many months. 

Ruzicka, born in Baltimore of Czechos- 
lovakian parents, never held public office, 
although he had been boomed for U. S. 



district attorney for Maryland in 1930. 
He had served several times as a member 
of the House of Delegates of the Mary- 
land Association. 

His widow is the only immediate sur- 
vivor. 

Clarence Winfield Stansfield 

Clarence Winfield Stansfield '06 Medi- 
cine, died last May 16 in Fall River, Mass., 
where he has been located since 1906. After 
10 years of general practice, he specialized 
in Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and served 
as an officer in World War I. He belonged 
to the Fall River, Mass., and American 
Medical Societies and was on the staff of 
both the Fall River General and Union 
Hospitals. He is survived by his wife, Mar- 
tha and two daughters, Louise and Frances, 

William E. Dolan 

Doctor William E. Dolan. 74 years of age, 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, an eye, ear, 
nose and throat specialist for more than 
40 years, died July 21, 1952, in St. Vincent 
Hospital. 

He was on the staff of St. Vincent and 
was a former member of the Memorial 
Hospital staff. 

A graduate of the University of Mary- 
land Medical School in 1902. he was at 
one time an assistant football line coach 
at the University. 

Following graduation. Dr. Dolan spent 
his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital, 
Baltimore. Maryland. He started his prac- 
tice in Worcester in 1907 and during World 
War I was a member of one of the Wor- 
cester District Medical Advisory boards. 

Dr. Dolan was a former member of the 
Worcester Country Club and the Eco- 
nomic Club. He was a member of the 
American Medical Association. Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, Worcester District 
Medical Society, New England Oto-Lai yn- 
gological Society, the Worcester Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Throat Society, Immaculate 
Conception parish. Sodality of the Blessed 
Virgin at Holy Cross College, and Alham- 
bra Council, K. of C. 

His associates remember him as a mem- 
ber of the faculty whose friendship was 
sincere and true. 

William Randall Wilson 

William Randall Wilson. 29. of the Den- 
tal School class of 1951 died suddenly of a 
heart attack on November 1. He was a 
graduate of Polytechnic Institute and 
Johns Hopkins University. At the age of 
13 he became a licensed amateur radio 
operator and had built his own "Ham" 
station at that age. He had worked for 
RCA and flew for the Civil Air Patrol. 
During World War II. he served with the 
Navy doing Radar Research at the Ana- 
cost ia Naval Station. He graduated from 
the University Cum Laude and was on 
the teaching Staff of the school for one 
year before entering full time practice in 
July. He is survived by his wife. Caral 
Haase Wilson, '48 H. Ec, a daughter, Dana, 
W-2 years old, both of Baltimore, and his 
parents Mr. & Mrs. James R. Wilson of 
Annapolis. 

James W. Word 

Dr. James W. Ward '95 Medicine, of 
South Glastonberry, Connecticut died last 
May after two years of illness. He had 
practiced for many years in Hartford and 
is survived by his wife. 



[50] 




BALTIMORE 



• ALL-AMERICA^ 

QUARTERBACK Jack Scarbath and 
Tackle Dick Modzelewski were 
named to the first team All-America, 
chosen by the American Football Coaches 
Association by Collier's. 

Scarbath, Modzelewski and McAuliffe. 
(Michigan State), were the only three 
selectees who were included in Collie r'.- 
August selections. The other eight an 
changes. 

Maryland is the only school with two 
players on the first team, viz : — 
E Bell. Pennsylvania 
T Meadows, Duke 
G Sewell, Texas 
C Moomaw, UCLA 
G Willhoitc. So. California 
T Modzelewski, Maryland 
E Martin, Ga. Tech 
HB McAuliffe, Mich. State 
HB Lattner, Notre Dame 
FB McPhail. Oklahoma 
QB Scarbath, Maryland 

INS All-America 

Jack Scarbath was the only Marylander 
selected for INS All-America, viz: — 

Offense 

E — Stolhandske, Texas 
E — Collier. Northwestern 
T— Willhoite, So. California 
T— Takacs, Ohio State 
C— Catlin. Oklahoma 
QB — Scarbath, Maryland 
HB — Hardeman, Georgia 
HB— Vessels. Oklahoma 
FB — Olszewski, California 

Defense 

E— Bell. Penn 
E — McPhee, Princeton 
T — Atkins. Tennessee 
T— Minnick. Nebraska 
(I — Eiscnhauer, Navy 
LBkr— Tamburo. Michigan State 
LBkr— Moomaw. UCLA 
LBkr— Schmidt. Pittsburgh 
HB— Laffner. Notre Dame 
HB— Moorehead. Ga. Tech 
SFTY— Sears, So. California. 

Scarbath Number Two 
Jack Scarbath finished second in the 
balloting for the Heisman Memorial Tro- 
phy awarded to the country's outstanding 
player. 

The trophy was won by Billy Vessels, 
Oklahoma half back, who received 525 
point- to Scarbath's 367, viz: — 

1. Vessels. Okla. 7. Sears, SC 

2. Scarbath, Md. 8. McAuliffe, M. St. 

3. Giel. Minn. 9. Henrich, Wash. 

4. Moomaw. UCLA 10. Cathn, Okla. 

5. Lattner. N.Dame 11. Hardeman. Ga. T. 

6. Cameron, UCLA 12. Crowder, Okla. 




ALL AMERICA 

Quarterback Jack Scarbath and Tackle Dick 
Modzelewski. named to COLLIER'S American 
Football Coaches All-America first team. Mary- 
land was the only school to place two on the 
first team. Other selections are listed adjacently. 



Look All-America 

Dick Modzelewski and Jack Scarbath 
were named to the 22-man Look squad, 
viz : — 

Offensive Team 

Ends — Flowers. Purdue; Stolhandske, 
Texas. 

Tackles— Gilbert, Mississippi; Miller, 
Georgia Tech. 

Guards — Willhoite. Southern California; 
Michels, Tennessee. 

Center — Cabin, Oklahoma. 

Backs — Scarbath, Maryland; Vessels, 
Oklahoma; Filipski, Villanova; Giel. Min- 
nesota. 

Defensive Team 

Ends — McPhee, Princeton; Voss, Wis- 
consin. 

Tackles — Modzelewski, Maryland; El- 
dred Kraemer, Pittsburgh. 

Guards — Rush. Michigan State; Harley 
Sewell, Texas. 

Backers-up — Moomaw, UCLA ; George 
Morris, Georgia Tech. 

Halfbacks— Lattner. Notre Dame; Gil 
Reich. Kansas. 

Safety — Fears. Southern California. 

Five Terps Selected 

Five Terps made the Southern Confer- 
ence Sports' Writers two-platoon team. 
In the balloting Jack Scarbath polled the 
second highest number of votes. Duke's 
Ed Meadows leading. 

In the closest voting in years. Scarbath 
and Stanley Jones made the first offensive 
team, while John Alderton, Dick Mod- 
zelewski and Ed Fullerton made the No. 1 
defensive team. 




DON'T GUESS 
GET -* 




MEATS 



BALTIMORE 




"Baltimore's 
Favorite Dessert" 

PEabody 2600 
2318 Belair Rd. Baltimore 13 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 



MUlberry 2847 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 

COMPANY 

1623-29 AISQUITH ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



King Bros. Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 3, MD. 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



51] 



WALTER C. DOE 
& COMPANY 



(^ on Ira ctorS 



602 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 

REpublic 7-1223 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



AMERICAN 

JANITOR SUPPLY 

COMPANY, INC. 

"Everything 
In Cleaning Needs" 

SANITATION EQUIPMENT 
BUILDING MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES 

1141 9th St. N.W. HObort 2-5400 

Washington, D.C. 



On the second teams Maryland landed 
Frank Navarro. Tom Cosgrove, Chet Han- 
ulak, Bill Maletzky and Beraie Faloney. 

"Mo" On All-Catholic 
Dick Modzelewski made Extension mag- 
azine's All-Catholic team. The selected 
eleven. 

Ends, Currin, Dayton and Flowers, Pur- 
due; tackles. Modzelewski, Maryland, and 
Much. Santa Clara; guards, O'Brien, Wis- 
consin, and Kush ; center, O'Shaughnessy, 
Michigan; quarterback, Filipski, Villa- 
nova; left halfback. Geil, Minnesota; right 
halfback. Lattner, Notre Dame; fullback, 
McAuhffe. 

INS All-Dixie 
Scarbath and Modzelewski also made 
the INS All-Dixie first team. John Alder- 
ton and Ed Fullerton made the second 
string, with Honorable Mention going to 
Stan Jones and Tom Cosgrove. The first 
team: — 

E — Meilinger. Kentucky 
T — Atkins, Tennessee 
G — D'Agostino, Florida 
C— Morris, Ga. Tech 
G — Michaels, Tennessee 
T — Modzelewski, Maryland 
E — Ratroff, Tennessee 
B— Mioduszewski. W & M 
B — Hardeman, Ga. Tech 
B — Moorehead, Ga. Tech 
QB — Scarbath, Maryland 

Player of the Year 

Jack Scarbath easily won Southern Con- 
ference player-of-the-year honors. 

The Southern Conference Sports Writers' 
Association thus honored a Maryland 
player for the second straight year, as 
Bobby Ward, the Terps' first All- America, 
was the winner last year. 

Lineman of the Year 

Dick Modzelewski received the John B. 
Outland Memorial trophy as the year's best 
lineman in the opinion of Grantland Rice 
and the Football Writers' Association of 
America in the annual selections for Look 
magazine. Jack Scarbath was third as back 
of the year, behind Vessels, of Oklahoma, 
and Giel of Minnesota. 

Number Fifteen 

In the AP Poll, released after the Ala- 
bama game, Maryland dropped to No. 15, 
viz : — 



1. Mich. State 

2. Sou. California 

3. Georgia Tech 

4. Oklahoma 

5. U.C.L.A. 

6. Mississippi 

7. Notre Dame 

8. Alabama 

9. Tennessee 
10. Texas 



11. Tulsa 

12. Wisconsin 
Duke 
Purdue 



13. 

14. 



15. Maryland 



16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 



Syracuse 

Florida 
Princeton 
Kentucky 
Virginia 



AP All-America 

Jack Scarbath made AP's All-America 
offensive team. The selections: — 



OFFENSIVE 

E— Stolhandske, Texas 

E — McPhee, Princeton 

T — Gilbert, Miss'pi 

T — Suminski, Wisconsin 

G — Michels, Tenn. 

G — Matuszak, Tulsa 

C — Brown, Ga. Tech 

B — Vessels, Okla. 

B — Giel, Minn. 

B — Heinrich, Wash. 

B — Scarbath, Maryland 



DEFENSIVE 

E — Branby, Colorado 
E — Scott, Virginia 
T — Kimmel, Houston 
T — LaPradd, Florida 
G — Kush, Mich. St. 
G — Eisenhauer, Navy 
Lbkr — Tamburo, M'h. St. 
Lbkr — Mcomaw, UCLA 
B — Sears, Sou. Cal. 
B — Lattner, N. Dame 
B — Moorehead, Ga. Tech. 



RAISE CHINCHILLAS 

The hobby with a future 




INTERESTING & PROFITABLE 

Many have developed a profitable and 
interesting business by starting with 
chinchillas as a hobby. 

LITTLE COMPETITION 

Chinchillas are extinct in the wild. 
Unlike other fur industries, there is 
no competition from wild pelts. 

A NEW INDUSTRY 

Chinchilla farming is in its infancy. 
Little space is needed for a business 
of unpredictable magnitude. 

Visit our chinchilla farm or write 
for full information 

SPARKS' 
CHINCHILLA FARM 

5885 Rollins Ave., Seat Pleasant, Md. 
JOrdan 8-6339 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

DRIVE THRU'' 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

WHERE YOU SAVE UP TO 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Ouf 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 
1016 Bladensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears Roebuck) 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

MATS: Any Size — Any Quantity 

24 Hour Service 
STEREOTYPES: Complete Blocking and 

Mortising Facilities 
MAILING: Addressing, Packaging 

1428 YOU STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 9, D.C. NOrth 7-1249 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIPS DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear — 1229 D St., S.E. 
LI. 3-4848 Washington 




52 



Sporting News 
Scarbath and Modzelewski made Sport- 
ing Xi ws All-America, viz: — 
E — McPhee, Princeton 
E — Flowers, Purdue 
T — Modzelewski, Maryland 
T— Miller. Georgia 
G — Michaels, Tennessee 
G — Eisenhauer, Navy 
C— Catlm. Oklahoma 
Lbkr — Moomaw, UCLA 
B — Vessels, Oklahoma 
B — Lattner, Notre Dame 
B — Scarbath, Maryland 
B — Hardeman. Ga. Tech 

Five On "South" 
Five Maryland players were selected for 
the South's team in the annual North- 
South Mahi Shrine's Christmas night char- 
ity game in the Orange Bowl. They are 
Jack Scarbath, Dick Modzelewski, Tom 
Cosgrove, Jim Alderton and Ed Fullerton. 

Five in Alabama 

Jack Scarbath, Maryland quarterback 
will play with the South's team at Mobile 
in the Senior Bowl. Opposing pitcher: — 
Hatty Agganis, Boston. Dick Modzelewski 
and Tom Cosgrove have also been selected 
for the Mobile game. Loyd Colteryahn 
will also play. 

Lloyd Colteryahn, Terp end, will be with 
the South's team in the Blue Gray game at 
Montgomery. 

FOOTBALL 




Terps Close With 7-2-0 Season 

ANY and varied were the 
explanations for the col- 
lapse of the Terps in the 
games against Missis- 
sippi and Alabama. Fel- 
lows who have spent a 
greater part of their life- 
times in sports point out 
that idle week-ends, just 
as the Terps had before Mississippi, could 
really lie the bad medicine. After wins 
over Missouri, Auburn, Clemson. Georgia. 
Navy, LSU and Boston, the season closed 
with the Mississippi 

Pand Alabama debacles. 
the Tatumterps having 
to settle for the satis- 
faction of knowing 
that in both States 
they drew the all time 
record crowds and that 
wins over Maryland 
meant bowl invita- 
tions for the victors. 
Well, as the feller said. 
that's all water 
through so many wash 
deck hoses and '53 is 
another year. We had a great ball club 
representing a great school. 

You can't win 'em all. The only ones 
who never strike out are those who never 
go to bat. Victory is compounded from 
deleat and defeat is never permanent. 

President Theodore Roosevelt, an ath- 
lete's sportsman, wrote, 

"In the battle of life, it is not the critic 
who counts; not the man who points out 
how the strong man stumbled, or where 
the doer of a deed could have done better. 






Theo. Roosevelt 



For Your 

Holiday Enjoyment 
MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 




• Rich, smooth, 
Delicious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 



Meadow Gold Products Co. 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

LOgan 

7-8455 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 

TOP SOIL ROAD GRAVEL 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

LOgan 

7-8448 








WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 







ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 
(SCAGLIOLA) 



ARTIFICIAL 
TRAVERTINE STONE 



ARTIFICIAL STONE 
FOR INTERIOR 



STANDARD ART, MARBLE and TILE CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

SCAGLIOLA - MARBLE - MOSAIC - TERRAZZO 
TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 



| 117 D STREET, NORTHWEST 



WASHINGTON 1, D. C. | 



Telephone NAtional 8-7413 



f 

- 

.-ST 


BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

jDscoms ^luaLitu Coni.cioui. 

PLANT: 621-27 G ST., N.W. MEtropolitan 2220 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



When patronizing advertisers please mention "Maryland'' 



53 



c 


Automatic 


A 


Merchandisers 


N 


. . . Serving the 


D 

1 

M 


University of 


Maryland 


CANDY 
CIGARETTES 


A 


SOFT DRINKS 


T 


Quality Merchandise 




Nationally Known 
Brands 


C 
O 

INC. 


Up-to-date Equipment 
PEobody 7700 


2124 Cambridge St. 

Baltimore 31, Md. 



HENDLERS 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Almost 50 Years 




SAVINGS & LOAN ASSN. 

'WHERE SAVINGS ARE SAFE' 

Insured up to $10,000.00 

5304 YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

Organized 1884 



The credit belongs to the man who is ac- 
tually in the arena; whose face is marred 
by dust and sweat and blood; who strives 
valiantly; who errs and comes short again 
and again, because there is no effort, with- 
out error and short-coming; who does ac- 
tually strive to do the deeds; who knows 
the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, 
spends himself in a worthy cause; who at 
the best knows in the end the triumph of 
high achievement; and who at the worst, 
if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, 
so that his place shall never be with those 
cold and timid souls who have tasted 
neither victory nor defeat." 

Mississippi 21; Maryland 14 

It couldn't go on forever. 

Maryland was confronted with the task 
of starting anew after Mississippi broke 
the Terp win streak at 19, and their un- 
defeated string at 22. 

01' Miss carried into the fray a record 
of six years without a defeat on home 
ground, and emerged with that record 
intact as they upended Maryland. 21 to 14. 

The Terps will go down in the books 
with other greats which have been tumbled 
from lofty pinnacles; such as Michigan, 
Xotre Dame and Army, to name only a 
few. 

While there was as much "dancin' to- 
night" as if the shrimp boats were comin'. 
the Terps at least take credit for being 
the only team to ever fill Hemingway 
Stadium with the largest crowd in the 
Magnolia state's sports history. 

Jimmy Lear, rated before the game as 
one of Dixie's best passers gave reason 
for more than sectional rating. 

Lear supplied the spark for 01' Miss. 
Completing 13 passes in 20 attempts, one 
of which went for a touchdown, Lear 
forced the Terps to battle with their backs 
tn the wall whenever they could get their 
hands on the ball. 

At the opening kickoff Maryland was 
rated as a two touchdown favorite, and a 
quarterback battle was predicted. 

Jack Scarbath, an outstanding split -T 
general under any circumstances, was un- 
able to complete a pass until very late in 
the fourth quarter when he connected with 
two pitches. The other Maryland pass 
completion came at the hands of Bernie 
Faloney after Scarbath had been injured. 

Maryland's defensive line was magnifi- 
cent. Three times Mississippi was within 
Maryland's 10 yard line. Each time the 
Terps held or forced a fumble, only to 
see the militant Rebels come charging 
back. They would not be denied and the 
fourth time Mississippi reached scoring 
position. Dillard pushed across. 

The deciding factor of the game stood 
in the pass defense of Mississippi and 
Maryland. While Scarbath could complete 
only two for the day, quarterback Jimmy 
Lear was hitting Jimmy Slay for long 
gains. 

Mississippi's three touchdowns came on 
drives of 83, 41 and 58 yards. 

The first touchdown play was a pass 
from Lear to Ray Howell from Maryland's 
31 yard line. The next two were scored 
by Dillard on plunges of three and four 
van Is. 

Maryland's markers were scored on a sus- 
tained drive of 53 yards, and an 89 yard 



runback bv Dick Nolan of a Mississippi 
kickoff. 

The big break of the Terps' first score 
came as they were about to punt from 
the Rebel 46 yard line. A penalty of five 
yards for delaying the game against Miss- 
issippi gave Maryland its needed first, and 
from there they marched. 

The statistics pretty well tell the story 
with Mississippi credited with 264 yards 
passing to the Terp's 33. Maryland, with 
Scarbath at the helm completed but 3 
of 14 pass attempts while Mississippi made 
good on 13 out of 20. Mississippi netted 
197 yards rushing to Maryland's 90 and 
the Rebs scored 19 first downs to Mary- 
land's 8. 

Neither "what might have been" nor 
comparative records count when that 
whistle blows for one afternoon with a 
scoreboard at the end and, to put it in 
the plain language of simple sportsman- 
ship, a very great football team was de- 
feated by a better one. 

Oh yes, there was "dancin' tonight" also 
in the streets of East Lansing, Michigan. 

Alabama 27; Maryland 7 

What seemed to be a bad dream against 
Mississippi turned out to be a night-mare 
against Alabama as the Crimson Tide en- 
gulfed Maryland, 27 to 7. 

Ray Hobson. Alabama's great quarter- 
back applied the pressure to the Terps as 
he raced and threw the Tide to its out- 
standing win of the season. 

Bobby Marlowe, All Southeastern Con- 
ference halfback raised havoc with the 
Maryland line, combined with fullback 
Fred Lewis. The Terp forward wall had 
its hands full. 

The Terps again experienced difficulty 
in running their option play, the smoothy 
which took care of their first seven op- 
ponents. However. Alabama had it bot- 
tled as did Mississippi. Once again Jack 
Scarbath was forced to throw for the long 
one. Several times he connected but after 
each completion the Terp drive would be 
halted by the stout 'Baraa defense, or a 
Terp runner would fumble. 

The Terps received the opening kickoff, 
and marched from their own 12 to the 
Alabama 49. The drive appeared to be 
going well until Scarbath was thrown for a 
six yard loss, and Maryland was forced to 
punt. 

Then the Crimson Tide marched 73 yards 
for the first score of the game, and went 
in front to stay. 

Confronting Maryland was the Notre 
Dame shift employed by Alabama. From 
the T formation, Alabama would shift 
into a box, and Maryland players would 
jump offsides believing the ball had been 
snapped. 

Three times the shift was used by 'Bama 
when goal line yardage was needed. Twice 
the Terps were fooled and Alabama 
scored. 

That sort of play, however, was not the 
prime factor in Maryland's loss. As against 
Mississippi, the Terp defense could not 
seem to hold the forward rushes of a 
strong opponent. 

An Alabama freshman. Jack Star, who 
folks down South are calling another Harry 
Gilmer, called and caught the Tide's only 
touchdown pass. 



54] 



A fine tribute was payed to center Tom 
Cosgrove immediately following the final 
sun. As lie was leaving the field, numerous 
Alabama players approached to shake his 
hand. A silent indication of the excel- 
lent job the Terp center has been doing 
all year at his pivot post. 

The scores of the contest went like this. 
After Alabama's first scoring drive which 
culminated as Luna pitched a strike to 
Star. Fred Lewis dove over from the one 
to give the Tide a 13 to halftime lead. 

In the third period Maryland scored its 
lone touchdown. After being stopped on 
the Alabama goal line, the Terps sur- 
rendered the ball on downs. Holding Ala- 
bama and forcing the rebels to punt from 
their own end zone. Maryland safetyman 
Chet Hanulak returned the ball to the 
Tide's 27. Two (days later, Scarbath lofted 
a pass to Weidensaul, and Don Decker 
converted. 

Alabama marched right back. Bobby 
Marlowe again increased the Tide's lead 
to two touchdowns as he scampered for 
five yards and six points. 

The final score of the game came on an 
intercepted pass thrown by Bernie Faloney. 
Cecil Ingram gathered in the wayward 
toss on the Maryland 30 and raced the 
distance. 

That break, however, was peanuts com- 
pared to the shuffle Maryland received 
late in the game when the umpire called 
back a Terp TD because of an illegal 
receiver downfield. 

Pictures of the game showed Maryland 
had no illegal receiver downfield. The 
official erred. 

Thu> Maryland was put deeper in the 
hole, their possible winning touchdown 
called back, and a definite tie nullified. 

The Terps led in only two departments. 
Maryland got 17 first downs to the Tide's 
12. and had 152 yards passing to 11 for 
Alabama, but in total yardage, Maryland 
trailed 306 to 252. Alabama completed 
one pass in two attempts, that one good 
for .i TD. The Terps connected with 10 
for 19. 

Maryland 34; Boston 6 

Maryland made it 19 straight wins as 
they pounded University of Boston to a 
34 to 6 defeat before 32.568 fans in Fenway 
Park. 

The 3.000 Terp followers who traveled 
to Boston during Maryland's annual Foot- 
ball Weekend were put at ease early in 
the game as the Old Liners tallied five 
TD's the first six times they handled the 
ball. 

With marches of 31. 52, 37. 50 and 62 
yards the Terps oontzed out three scores 
during the first period and two in the 
second. Don Decker toed four for five 
conversion attempts. 

Early in the third quarter Coach Tatum 
cleared the bench of Maryland players. 
With Bernie Faloney at the helm. Mary- 
land continued to bang on touchdown 
door, but each time as it was about to 
open, offside penalties nullified the Terp 
threats. 

Pregame write-ups had the contest down 
on record as a battle between two All 
America quarterback candidates, Jack 
Scarbath and Harry Agganis. The battle 
n< \ (i materialized. 



^^^•.^^v^'.^v^^t^^^^^^v.^^^^^^^v.^v.^'>^^^^^>t^^t^v.^v.^^^^^^v.^^lc^>•^v.^v.^v.^v^ 



Schmidt 



BLUE 

RIBBON 

BREAD 



BALTIMORE 



MARYLAND 



".<^v.^-.<^>-K^-.(^-.t^v.^v.^-.t^>v < 5>-i<^i:^-K^-.<. 



\ 




/ 




Baltimore Brick Company 

3200 E. MADISON STREET 
BALTIMORE 5, MARYLAND 

S)0inCU)00t) Soft, Mellow, Sand Finished 

Bricks of These Appealing Blends: 

Queen Anne King William 
Mosaic Cameo 
Carrollton Middle Plantation 




/ 




\ 



MARYLAND 


OFFICE 


SUPPLY CO. 


Complete line of 




Visit our fine 


Office Supplies & 




Greeting Card 


School Supplies 


PLaza 7615 


Department 


111 W. BALTIMORE ST. 


BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



BALFOUR 



Fraternity Pins 
Maryland Class Rings 

JEWELRY NOVELTIES 

PROGRAMS FAVORS 

CRESTED STATIONERY 
MEDALS - CUPS - TROPHIES 

Phone: NAtional 8-1044 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

240 International Building 

1319 F Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE COMPANY 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

LIMESTONE 
GRANITE MARBLE 

NOrlh 7-1508 2501 Ninth St. N.E. 

Washington 18, D.C. 



ART METAL 
FINISHING CO. 

GOLD AMD SILVER PLATING 
ANTIQUES REPAIRED & RESTORED 

923- 12th Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 8-1326 



* NATIONAL * 
AUTO TOP CO. inc. 

COMPLETE ACCIDENT SERVICE 
Body Repairs 

Auto 
Painting 

Seat 
Covers 

Upholstering 

2114 — 14th St., N.W. DEcatur 2-2347 

WASHINGTON 9, D. C. 




* hour service for line cuts 
... zinc & copper halftones 

Advertisers Engraving Service, Inc. 



Washington Post Bid?. 



NA. 8-5434 



Washington 



While Scarbath was firing broadsides 
all afternoon. Agganis was unable to even 
get his cannon loaded. 

Before a rib injury sidelined him in the 
second quarter Agganis failed to complete 
his two attempted passes, and his six run- 
ning attempts netted him a total loss of 
44 yards. 

While Scarbath continued to baffle his 
opponents with the best football slight-of- 
hand to be found anywhere, he managed 
to thread the needle for eight pass com- 
pletions in 12 attempts for a total of 95 
yards and personally gained 28 yards in 
eight rushes through the line. 

Four Terps scored touchdowns. Ralph 
Felton twice; Chet Hanulak. Bob Laugh- 
cry and Leland Liebold once each. 

Little Hanulak mat died the Terrier total 
offense as he smashed for 95 yards. In 
total offense the Terps led with 380. 

The touchdowns by Leibold and Laugh- 
cry were short plunges through the sag- 
ging Boston line. Hanulak's marker came 
on an end sweep from 23 yards away, 
while Felton's two scores came via an off- 
tackle plunge and a tricky piece of ball 
handling which involved four men. 

On Felton's first score he met two Bos- 
ton defenders three yards from the double 
line. Before Maryland's right halfback 
could be stopped, he had scored the Terp's 
first six points, and given two Terriers a 
pick-a-back ride into their own end zone. 

Felton's other marker started out as a 
lateral from Scarbath to Hanulak who in 
turn passed to end Lou Weidensaul. About 
to be dropped in bis tracks on the three, 
Weidensaul lateraled to Felton racing by. 
and the fleet back crossed the goal in one 
stride. 

The Boston homecoming crowd cheered 
as long and loud for Maryland and 
its football greatness as they did for the 
home team. However, boos and cat-calls 
were forthcoming as Tatum sent in his 
first string defense late in the fourth quar- 
ter to stop a sustained Terrier drive. 

The Terps held, but after taking pos- 
session of the ball, they were forced to 
punt. Fred Heffner booted for Maryland, 
but he needn't have bothered as Joe Ter- 
rasi, a 155 pounder gathered in the punt 
and glitched 57 3 r ards for Boston's only 
marker. 

Xow Boston could really cheer. 
(Frosh Football on page 64) 

SOCCER 

Penn 1 1; Maryland 

ARYLAXD'S soccer squad 
opened its season against 
a strong Penn team, and 
was beaten 11 to 0. 

Suffering from losses of 
last year's players, the 
Terps were also handi- 
apped by sudden ineligi 
bility of 21 men under Conference rules. 
Coach Doyle Royal's team could not 
hold the Lions during the first half as 
they rolled up a six point lead. The sec- 
ond half proved almost as bad as Penn 
booted home five more. 

Maryland 3; W&L 2 

The Terps made it 14 Southern Con- 




ference victories in a row as they edged 
Washington and Lee, 3 to 2. 

Five seconds after the opening gun, 
Hector Salinas kicked his first of three 
tallies for the day and Maryland tempo- 
rarily held the lead. 

Roddy Davis of the Generals then 
booted two indirect corner shots to put 
his team in front. Salinas tied it up sec- 
onds before the half ended. 

In the third period Salinas again scored 
for the Terps, the Black and Gold holding 
its lead until the final gun. 

Maryland 3; N.C. State 2 

North Carolina State was the next to 
fall before the Maryland soccer team, 
3 to 2. 

Hector Ormachea opened the scoring 
with a head shot early in the first period. 
State tied it up a few minutes later, but 
in the third and fourth the Terps racked 
two more to make it 3 to 1. 

Joe Pragas ended the scoring for State 
as he booted home a long outside angle 
shot. 

Maryland 1; Duke 1 

After two over-time periods the Terps 
were forced to settle for a 1-1 tie with 
Duke. 

This ended Maryland's Southern Con- 
ference winning streak at 15, but left 
them in the running for repeating of their 
Conference championship. 

The Liners tallied first as freshman Mario 
Eterovic took a pass from Hector Salinas 
and scored from close in. 

Duke tied it up in the fourth as Jose 
Riquezes shot one past Maryland's goalie. 

Maryland 2; Loyola 1 

Maryland returned to the win column 
by beating Loyola 2 to 1. 

Operating without three of its regular 
starters. Maryland scored both its mark- 
ers in the third period. 

Joe Hagedorn. playing center vice the 
ailing Hector Salinas, scored both of the 
Terps' markers. 

The first tally headed into the upper 
corner of the net. The second one scooted 
through the goalie's legs. 

Maryland 2; North Carolina 1 

Two freshmen scored Maryland's only 
goals as the Terps gave North Carolina 
a 2 to 1 beating in College Park. 

Mario Etorovic. team high scorer, 
pushed his score through first from close 
in. He was followed by John Beck, who 
booted his tally to the right of the goalie 
while coming in from direct center. 

Maryland 3; Georgetown 

The Terp soccer squad defeated George- 
town University in the rain and mud. 3 
to 0. 

John Eterovick. leading Maryland 
scorer, booted home the Terps' first goal, 
and was followed by John Beck who shot 
through a high corner kick. 

Jim Salonis wrapped up the Terp scor- 
ing with a headon shot in the fourth period. 
Salonis had been nursing a bad ankle most 
of the season, but was ready to do battle 
against the Hoyas. 



56] 



CROSS COUNTRY 




Terps Toke Penn 

ARYLAXD'S cross coun- 
try squad returned to the 
win column following 
their Navy defeat as they 
ran Pennsylvania into the 
ground. 15 to 50. 

Once again Johnny Tib- 
hets of Maryland led the 
pack as he raced home in the time of 20 
minutes 13.5 second-. Against Navy his 
closest challenger was 150 yards astern. 
Against Penn the nearest man was 220 
yards in the red. 

Tibbets established himself as an out- 
standing distance man last year while run- 
ning under the direction of Coach Jim 
Kehoe. "While participating in the two 
mile event last season at the Indoor Track 
Championships, Tibbets placed second 
after having been down with the flu for 
an entire week. 

In the Outdoor Championships two- 
miler Tibbets came in No. 1. 

Following Tibbets across the finish line 
against Penn were six Marylanders; Ben 
Goode. Don Goldstein. Ray Horsley, 
Kenny Thornton. Joe Swafford and Jerry 
McGee all tied for second to finish well in 
front of the nearest Penn participant. 



Tarheels Token 

Victory number two for Maryland's har- 
riers came at the expense of North Caro- 
lina. 15 to 51. 

For the third successive time, the Liner's 
Johnny Tibbets finished well ahead of the 
second place man as he covered the dis- 
tance of 3.8 miles in the good time of 19 
minutes and 53 seconds. 

Eight Maryland runners crossed the fin- 
ish line before a Tarheel hove in sight. 
Running well behind Tibbets again came 
Ben Goode. Maryland's outstanding fresh- 
man, followed by Ray Horsley. They tied 
for second position. 

Joe Swafford finished fourth, trailed by 
Kenny Thornton and Don "Glip" Gold- 
stein in another tie. this time for the five 
spot. Joe Faass and Bill McFee took 
seventh and eighth places. 

In a post meet statement Coach Jim 
Kehoe said "The team looked very im- 
pressive." 

Duke Downed 

To make it three in a row Maryland's 
Johnny Tibbets latched on to first place 
position at the starting gun and held it 
for 20 minutes and 25 seconds, leading the 
Terps in a 15 to 53 rout of Duke. 

Thus Maryland remained undefeated in 
Southern Conference competition, and 
came close to handing the boys from Dur- 
ham the same score which they gave them 
last year. At that time Maryland won 15 
to 55, the Terps taking the first eight 
places, this year, they missed by only two. 

Terp harriers Don Goldstein, Ben Goode, 
Kenny Thornton. Joe Swafford and Ray 
Horsley finished behind Tibbets and ahead 
of Duke captain John Tate. 






I NCORPORATED 



ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 



REpublic 7-1343 



2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 



WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 




Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 

Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91-0 Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D.C. 



SALES 




SERVICE 



AIR CONDITIONERS - REFRIGERATION - AUTOMATIC ICE MAKERS 

WASHINGTON REFRIGERATION CO 



2052 WEST VIRGINIA AVENUE, N.E. 



Lincoln 7-8300 



Washington, D.C. 



Jack Blank 

Invites You To 

T 

Test Drive The New 

1952 
PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade^ 
Pontiac 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 

ADAMS 4-8500 

Washington's Largest 
Pontiac Dealer 



Jf ulLer & b'^lfjert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVER Y 
PHOTOGRAPH 
NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone — EXecutive 3-8120 

81 5 TENTH STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



modern 
machinists co. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D.C. NAIional 8-6478 



Richmond Routed 

Failing to place a runner in the first 
two positions, Terp harriers nevertheless 
defeated Richmond 25 to 34 and kept their 
Southern Conference record unblemished. 

For the first time this season, Maiyland's 
Johnny Tibbets failed to break the tape 
in a dual meet, and on an off day finished 
fifth behind Ben. Goode and Larry Fassas 
of Maryland, third and fourth respectively. 

Sixth, seventh and eighth places were 
captured by Ken Thornton, Don Gold- 
stein and Joe Swafford of Maryland. 

Vance Thiede, running for Richmond 
broke the course record as he romped home 
in the fast time of 21 minutes, one-tenth 
of a second ahead of his teammate, Bill 
Jordan, who was only three yards behind. 

Thiede clipped 12.9 seconds from the 
four mile Richmond course record which 
previously stood at 21.13. 

Second Place 

Maryland's cross country team took 
second place in the Southern Conference 
championships, finishing behind North 
Carolina State, 49 to 65. 

Johnny Tibbets finished third behind 
two top flight runners. Buzz Sawyer and 
Clyde Garrison, both representing State. 
Garrison was defending champion, but lost 
ground in the last half mile to finish be- 
hind his teammate. 

The State team was favored to take the 
meet with Maryland picked to give them 
the most trouble. West Virginia trailed 
with 69 points. 

Ben Goode, the Terps' outstanding fresh- 
man, ran sixth in defeating Bob Shockley 
of State who is the Conference outdoor 2 
mile champ. This was the first champion- 
ship meet for Goode. 

This meet ended the season for Mary- 
land's harriers with a record of 4-1. After 
having its win streak snapped at 29, the 
Terp squad started anew, and have run 
through four straight victories. 

The biggest loss to the Liners this sea- 
son will be that of Johnny Tibbets, who 
failed to finish first only once in dual meet 
competition. Freshman Goode, however, 
is expected to fill his shoes, and to give 
added strength to both the outdoor and 
indoor squads this year. 

BASKETBALL 

Maryland 71; Virginia 61 

ARYLAND opened the 
1952-53 basketball season 
with an impressive 71-61 
victory over the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 

Led by Gene Shue and 
Don Moran with 17 and 
14 points respectively, the 
Terps led after the first two minutes. 
Moran, captaining this year's squad, and 
Shue, are the only returning starters from 
Coach Millikin's crew of last season. 

The Cavaliers stayed within reach of 
the Terps throughout most of the game, 
and started the second half with only a 
four point deficit. Late in the contest 
Virginia's Dick Wilkinson popped in three 
straight goals to cut Maiyland's lead to 
three points, 48-45. 

With six minutes remaining in the final 
period, the Terps put on a display of ball 




handling typical of the coaching of Bud 
Millikin. First inside and then outside, 
the Terps passed the ball for minutes at 
a time, but shot only when a perfect setup 
had been established. Firing on such oc- 
casions. Maryland made all of its tries, 
and boosted their lead to 17 points. 

Excellent rebound work was handled by 
Moran and Ralph Greco, sixth man on the 
squad, who through his efforts might have 
claimed a starting berth for himself. 

One other Terp, Bob Dilworth, showed 
promise of a good future as he rebounded 
nicely and collected nine points while sub- 
bing for Gene Shue, who had been re- 
moved from the game after four personal 
fouls. 

The effectiveness of the Terps' shooting 
eye became apparent early in the • first 
period when they ran the score from 9 to 8 
to 19 to 8 without missing a single try at 
the hoop. 

The deciding factor of the game rested 
with the none-too-deadly accuracy of Vir- 
ginia's shooting. As the minutes ticked 
away, the Cavaliers panicked apart at the 
seams, while the Terps displayed excellent 
ball handling and made each shot count. 
When Maryland missed, either Moran or 
Greco were there to reclaim the ball. 

Maryland 64; W&M 61 

The Terps defeated William and Mary, 
64-61, but not before the Indians gave 
them a real scare. 

Leading 57-47 with less than six minutes 
to play, 3,125 Maryland rooters were just 
about ready to call the game a win, when 
W&M sparked to within one point of tying 
Maryland with 15 seconds left. 

Free throws made it 52-61. An over 
anxious W&M defense fouled Terp George 
Manis who sank both foul throws to wrap 
up the game. 

Maryland took the lead in the first three 
minutes of play on two baskets by Ronnie 
Brooks, and kept it the rest of the way, 
although it looked as though they might 
lose the advantage down the home stretch. 

Gene Shue was high again for Maryland 
with 22 points, while Don Moran and 
Ralph Greco followed with 14 and 12 re- 
spectively. 

In the preliminary game the baby Terps 
took a 49-48 victory over Fort Meade. 
The Frosh scored 15 points to the Gen- 
erals' one in the final quarter. Bob Kessler 
was high scorer with 14 points. 

Penn 70; Maryland 53 

Maryland's second half rally fell short 
as the University of Pennsylvania opened 
its basketball season with a 70-53 win 
over the Terps. 

But even in defeat, Maryland's Gene 
Shue put on a brilliant scoring display as 
he led both teams with 26 points. Shue, 
who connected with nine field goals and 
eight fouls, outscored Penn's All America 
Ernie Beck who finished with 24 points. 

Maryland, trailing 31-21 at halftime, 
finally got its attack rolling early in the 
third quarter. Moe Levin's foul shot cut 
the margin to 36-31. 

But when it appeared Maryland would 
threaten seriously, the Quakers turned on 
their scoring punch. Two straight field 
goals by the Red and Blue put Penn 
ahead and it retained its margin until the 
final whistle. 



[58] 



Perm jumped off to a 2-0 lead and built 
it up to 7-3 before George Mania' side 
shot got Maryland rolling. Levin's foul 
shot tied the count at 8-all before the 
Quakers moved ahead to a 16-11 margin 
as the first quarter ended. 

Penn. with Beck and co-captain Tom 
Holt showing the way, continued to main- 
tain the lead at the intermission. Shue's 
four field goals kept Maryland in conten- 
tion during the opening half, but his bril- 
liant shooting could not close the gap in 
the final 20 minutes. 

All other Terp players were held to five 
or less points with the exception of Moe 
Levin who scored 11. Levin could sink 
only one shot from the floor, but close 
guarding by the Penn team allowed him to 
drop nine free throws. 

Some Tall Timber 

Of a 20 man squad, coached by former 
All America Bud Millikan, the Terp squad 
carries only five seniors, all lettermen. 
They include Don Moran, last season's 
center, who has been switched to forward, 
and Tom Connelly, 6' 2" forward. 

The outstanding junior, Gene Shue, 
returns from last 3-ear's starting five. Bob 
Kessler, a freshman from George Wash- 
ington high school, who stands 6' 4" will 
see a lot of action at fonvard. In a post- 
season tournament last year, Kessler was 
almost a one-man team as the young 
Colonials came close to beating a great 
Mc Kinley Tech team. 

Height will help this season. Only one 
man, Frank Fellows, a senior from Hyatts- 
ville stands under 6 feet. Five Terps 
tower 6' 4" or more. 

Last year's overall record was 13 won 
and 8 lost ; the Conference record 9 won 
and 5 lost. In the Southern Conference 
tournament, the Terps finished with a one 
and one total. 



*Dec. 


13 


West Virginia 




17 


V.M.I. 




18 


Washington & Lee 


Jan. 


3 


North Carolina 




5 


Virginia 




7 


Richmond 


* 


10 


Georgetown 


* 


12 


V.P.I. 




17 


North Carolina 


Feb. 


3 


George Washington 




6 


V.P.I. 


* 


9 


Richmond 


* 


12 


V.M.I. 


* 


14 


Washington & Lee 




17 


William and Mary 




19 


Georgetown 




21 


Navy 


""" 


24 


George Washington 



* Home Games at College Park 

• •••••••••• 

YEA, BROTHER! 

A group oj Marylanders were iliscussing 
a certain //< wspaper attack on a certain 
fellow and one oj the group an ntioned, 
"Why, the guy that wrote that filthy arti- 
cle doesn't even KXOW the man he is 
attacking !" 

Replied another of the group, a fellow 

/ been around a bit longer, "That 

wouldn't be the first time people crucified 

a Man they did not know and don't know 

fet". 





WRITE OR PHONE FOR ILLUSTRATED FOLDERS ON 



Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Central America 



Havana 

Hawaii 

Mediteranean 



Nassau 

Panama 

South America 



PHONE— ADam* 2-8700 




2311 CALVERT ST., N.W 



WASHINGTON 8, D.C. 



Serving the 

FINEST MEATS & POULTRY 

To Hotels - Clubs - Colleges 

SOUTHERN 

HOTEL SUPPLY COMPANY 

LINCOLN 7-8275 



4th & Morse Street, N.E. 



Washington, D.C. 



WASHINGTON WOODWORKING 
COMPANY, INC. 

"Tailors of the Woodworking Industry 9 
CUSTOM MADE 

BOOKCASES PANELLING PARTITIONS 

STORE FIXTURES DISPLAY CASES 

CABINETS FOR HOME, OFFICE, INSTITUTIONS 

FURNITURE TO SPECIFICATIONS 

PHONE: NAtional 8-5624 

912— 4th STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 




ANDERSON ELECTRIC CO. 



SALES & 
SERVICE 

1433 P St., N.W. 



INDUSTRIAL 
COMMERCIAL 



MOTORS ■ PUMPS • MACHINERY 
DU. 7-5527 



Washington, D.C. 



59" 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 

ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 




SILVER 

swwrs 



A Sign 

In Silver Spring 

This sign marks the 
location of the best 
in banking service. 



Drive-In Banking 
Service 

JU. 9-900 



8701 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



MODERN 
REALTY CO. 

REALTORS - INSURANCE 

Specializing in 
Montgomery Co. Property 

JU: 7-5350 
9719 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



INSURED SAVINGS 

Earn Liberal Dividends 

Citizens Bldg. & Loan 

Pershing & Fenton Silver Spring 



Culp Welding Co. 

GENERAL WELDING & 
MACHINE WORKS 

JUniper 5-8244 
937 Selim Rd. Silver Spring, Md 



WRESTLING 




ANY returning Southern 
Conference title holders 
boost Coach Sully 
Krouse's hopes for an- 
other S.C. wrestling cham- 
pionship. 

Rod Norris, Bob and 

Ernie Fisher and Jack 

Shanahan all won Southern Conference 

championships last year, and are aiming 

for repeat performances. 

The only spark plug lost from last year's 
team was little Joel Adelberg, captain for 
1951-52. Adelberg was Southern Confer- 
ence champion at 178 pounds in 1950, 
but saw onhy limited action last year as 
Bob Fisher pushed him out of the line-up 
during early training. 

Last year Maryland's wrestlers did not 
drop a single match, and won the Con- 
ference crown going away. 

Dec. 13 West Virginia 
"Jan. 9 North Carolina State 
3 1 Navy 
Feb. 7 Washington & Lee 
14 V.M.I. 
21 North Carolina 
* 28 Penn. State 




Home Meets at College Park 

BOXING 

A R Y L AND' S boxing 
team, piloted by head 
coach Frank Cronin. 
meets Syracuse Univer- 
sity's ringsters in the 
coming New Orleans Su- 
gar Bowl meet. In the 
gym the Terps look good 
indeed. 

Syracuse, coached by ex-Marine Roy 
Simmons, several times the first choice 
team for the Sugar Bowl, is generally well 
stocked with former New York and New 
Jersey AAU stars. They will be the favor- 
ites to take the Terps. However, the last 
time a Maryland boxing team took part 
in the Crescent City's annual classic it 
won from the sturdy opposition offered by 
Michigan State. That was in 1948. Neither 
should the current Terp team be sold short. 
The Terrapin squad includes lads from 
distant states who chose Maryland for its 
boxing set-up. as well as youngsters who 
laced on their first pair of gloves in the 
College Park training room. 

Collegiate boxing has adopted the Olym- 
pic weights, calling for ten-man squads. 
In either the 119 or 125 pound classes 
Cronin will rely upon Gary Garber. Guido 
Capri, or Bobby Schwartz. Garber, from 
San Jose, California, was formerly All- 
Army bantamweight champion and Pan- 
American Olympics runner-up. Capri is 
a former Carolinas Golden Gloves champ. 
Bobby Schwartz is strictly a Maryland 
University intramurals product. 

At 132, the Terps will again depend upon 
little Jackie Letzer, convincing southpaw 
puncher now in his third year on the var- 
sity team. A graduate of the intramurals, 
he did his first competitive boxing at 
Maryland. 




ATHLETE FROM ABILENE 

Ronnie Rhodes, Maryland's 165 pound South- 
ern Collegiate Champion, displays a set of long- 
horns from Rhodes' home town and birthplace, 
Abilene, Texas. Majorettes Barbara Taylor, 
left, and Betty Woodard. right, look on. 

Rhodes, who last year won the Tom Birming- 
ham Memorial Cup as Maryland's outstanding 
boxer, is a junior in Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. The two majorettes are Home 
Economics students. 

The horns, with a tip to tip spread of 94 
inches, are wide even for Texas, says Dub 
Rhodes, Ronnie's father, sportsman and boxing 
enthusiast. Rhodes won three Texas amateur 
titles before matriculating at Maryland before 
his 18th birthday. 



Brackete'l from the 139 to the 147 pound 
classes, the College Parkers have Russell 
Eddy, Prince Georges County Boys' Club 
youngster who, as a juvenile, ofttimes 
boxed exhibition bouts at Maryland ring 
shows, and Gary Fisher from last year's 
squad, who held the AAU Maryland State 
welterweight title before matriculating at 
Maryland. Len Weiss, former Charlotte 
Hall boxer, is bidding for a berth in the 
139 or 147 classes as is also Bob Theofield. 
dynamic puncher who graduated from the 
University's intramural program and also 
laced on his first gloves at Maryland. 

Available for the call at either 156 or 
165 are Thomas Woods, a Virginia boy 
who held the middleweight title at Fort 
Custer, Michigan, and Ronnie Rhodes. 
Rhodes, who last year took the Southern 
Intercollegiate 165 pound championship at 
Baton Rouge on wins over entries from 
Syracuse, Minnesota, and South Carolina, 
is from Abilene, Texas. After looking over 
various college boxing set-ups he chose 
Maryland. Rhodes, son of Dub Rhodes, 
prominent Texas sportsman and boxing 
enthusiast, won three amateur titles in the 
Lone Star state before his 18th birthday, 
including the Texas Open AAU, the North 
Texas District Championship, and the 
Texas Amateur Athletic Federation Title. 
Last year Rhodes won the Tom Birming- 
ham Memorial Trophy as the year's out- 
standing boxer. 

Also at 165 to 178, the Terps have Billy 
Mclnnis, former National Scholastic 155 
pound champ, as well as the Carolinas 
Golden Gloves champion. Like Capri, Mc- 
lnnis is from North Carolina. 



601 



Available for action in either t he 178 
pound class or the heavyweight division. 
Cronin has Calvin Quenstedt, in his third 
boxing year. Cal is a former Charlotte 
Hall boxer. Dave Ortel. hard punching 
youngster who first took up boxing at the 
University, is a good bet at these weights. 
Striving for either the 175 or the heavy 
spot the Terps also have Hob Cavanaugh, 
New Jersey amateur who formerly held 
the Army's Constabulary championship in 
Germany, Leo Coyne, all-around athlete 
from Pittsburgh, and Billy Mess. Central 
High lad from Washington, D. C. 

Coach Cronin. who as a member of 
Maryland's 1939 Conference Championship 
team enjoyed an undefeated season, was a 
natural right hander who chose to box as 
a southpaw. On his squad this year Cronin 
has five natural southpaws. 
Dec. 27 Syracuse — Sugar Bowl 

Syracuse 

Penn. State 

The Citadel 

Army 

Michigan State 

South Carolina 

Home Meets at College Park 



Jan. 


17 




31 


Feb. 


13 




21 




27 


Mar 


6 



"Sweet Ad-u I . . . " 

Barbershop quartets from approximately 
1,5 campus fraternities participated in the 
annual quartet contest sponsored by Phi 
Kappa Tau. 

The Harmony Hall was held in the Coli- 
seum. 

Art Lamb and Aletha Agee. television 
disc jockeys from WTTG in Washington, 
were master and mistress of ceremonies. 

The "Columbians," a professional bar- 
bershop quartet, were special guests. They 
were East Coast champions and interna- 
tional finalists in 1951. 



WITH ROLLER SKATERS 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller. USMC (Ret), 
Director of Publications and Publicity, has 
been elected to the National Advisory 
Council of the U. S. Amateur Roller Skat- 
ing Association (AAU). He is also a mem- 
ber and treasurer of the Boxing Com- 
mittee of the U. 8. Olympic Games (AAU). 




ALL FIGURED OUT 

. . . "but Mr. Framson, Betty Jean said we 
can afford to marry and continue at the Uni- 
versity if you keep on working !" 



Good 



£ 




Ice-cold Coke is 
a part of any pause 
...the refreshing part 



tOTTlEO UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA COIA COMPANY Bl 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS 

JUniper 5-3100 Silver Spring, Md. 




Get Acquainted with . . . 

QUAINT ACRES NURSERY 

ON THE COLESVILLE PIKE (U.S. 29) 

Complete Landscape Service 

TREE MOVING PRUNING TRANSPLANTING 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

5 Miles from Georgia Ave. 

JUniper 9-5810 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



WILSON PONTIAC, Inc. 

Silver Spring's Oldest Automobile Agency — Established 1935 

Pontiac Sales • Service • Parts 
7925 GEORGIA AVE. Opposite Hot Shoppe SILVER SPRING, MD. 



iipb Silver Spring Piano Co. 



FAMOUS MAKES — New and Used 
SPINETS CONSOLES GRANDS UPRIGHTS 

857 Pershing Drive JU. 9-6338 Silver Spring, Md. 




Terms Arranged 



The Citizens Bank of Takoma Park 

Member Federol Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Takoma Park, Maryland 



When patronizing advertisers please mention "Maryland' 



61 



Distinctive Dining . . . 

Water Gate Inn 

On the Potomac at F 

Open every day 11:30 to 10 p.m. 
District 7-9256 Washington, D.C. 



HELSING 
BROTHERS 

INCORPORATED 



PAVING 
CONTRACTORS 



4207 - 39th Street/ N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C. 



EMerson 2-2231 



SUBURBAN 
WATERPROOFING CO. 

Specializing in 

Waterproofing Basements 

BELOW GROUND 

Waterproofing Masonry 

ABOVE GROUND 

Call HENRY EADER, JU. 7-7695 

2814 Linden Lane 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 




WISE OWL 

Potato Chips 

Distributors 

10753 Colesville Road 

Silver Spring, Md. 



Mention "Maryland" when patronizing 
ml n rtisers 




A "friend" is a jcllow who will try to help you overcome misfortunes rather than proving 

to be one of them. 



SMACKO! Crash! Whoppinger! An- 
other collision on Hiway 1. 
"What caused it?" asked the State 
trooper. 

"Wife fell asleep in the back seat," re- 
plied hapless Herman Hanswurst. 



Thret college professors, for whom there 
was too much noise, confusion and con- 
versation on the campus, took up abode 
in a cove. Things ran smoothly for two 
years when, one day, one of the hermits 
remarked, "That was a cute white rabbit 
that just dashed by outside." 

Two years later the second prof com- 
mented, ''That was a brown rabbit". 

Three years later the third hermit spoke 
up, ''if this constant bickering does not 
cease I'm returning to the campus!" 



How about the fellow who, about to 
shave, looked into a vacant frame from 
which the hotel bath room mirror had 
fallen and remarked, "I must have checked 
out earlier." 



Like the mucilage addict who. reaching 
fur a mirror, stared into a hair brush in- 
sU ad and crack*, d. "Gosh. I ru ( d a shave!" 



Sometimes a woman spends a great deal 
of time looking for a husband after she 
has secured him. 



At the blood bank the nurse asked 
"what type are you?" "Sultry," replied 
Baltimore Betty. 



Do you know what iss it a "ts-ts maker?" 
A ts-ts maker is a kibitzer who, at a 
card game, stands behind a player's chair 
and expresses disapproval of a play by 
making, "Ts! Ts!" 



An elderly lady driver turned onto No. 1 
and ran over a B.&P.A. feller. The old 
lady pulled up and called "Young man. 
you'd better u-alch out!" 

The battered B.&PA.'r stuttered, "Gosh. 
lady, don't tell mi you're going to hack 
up!" 



Honesty is the test policy. 



He icho hesitates is bossi J. 



Money may get a man into trouble, but 
it also helps to get him out. 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE 

MONROE 

1237 East West Hgwy 



^rinest *jrord J«, 



3&& 



COMPANY 

Silver Spring, Md. 



Mrs. Schnattcrgans: "I'd like to inquire 
about bonds?" 

Guy in the bank : "Subscription, redemp- 
tion or conversion?" 

Mrs. Schnattergans: "What is this? A 
bank or a church.'" 



Old English lunch room all newly deco- 
rated. 
Sign on the door: "Wette Paynte." 



Sociology Professor: "What got you in- 
to trouble?" 

Xo. 7114U44: "Competition. I made the 
same sort of bills Uncle Sum made." 



The Swedish maid was sure the sporty 
guy owned a Hawaiian plantation when 
he said, "Let's step out and raise cane. 
Sugar ! " 

That peculiar odor in the post office 
is from the dead letU rs. 



"Look! We're broom mates. We sweep 
together. Dust we two." 



Auto wrecks outnumbt r train xorecks be- 
cause the railroad engineer does not neck 
with the fireman. 

Gal to cabby: "To the maternity hos- 
pital. Take your time. I only work there." 



"Yes, he asked Terpclta to marry him. 
Even told her about his rich uncle. Now 
Tcrpctta's his auntie." 



Speedster: "You can't arrest me. I'm 
from one of the oldest families on the 
Eastern Sho'." 

State Trooper: "Come right along, 
buddy. We ain't arresting you for 
breedin' purposes." 



An explosion in your houst can be 
caused by the powder on your coat. 



Notice in Scotch church : "Those who 
wish to put buttons in the collection plate 
will please furnish their own and not use 
the buttons from the pew seat cushions." 



Farmer up near Walkersville bought a 
horse at auction and found that he would 
neither eat nor drink. "By golly." mused 
the new owner, "I've got a real bargain — 
;'/ he's a good worker." 



Marriage is like poker. Takes a pair 
to open. He leads with a diamond. She 
shows a flush. They wind up with a full 
house. 

"Before coming to Maryland I worked 
in Des Moines." 
"Copper or coal?" 



62 



The champion oj all optimists was the 

one who cheerfully went to tht electric 

chair with shock absorbers in his hip 
pockets. 



In a Western Pennsylvania town a little 
girl who, holding her Mutter by the hand, 
watched the passing of a long freight train 
with a caboose on the end. and asked, 
"Ain't so, Maw, when t ho little red house 
on wheels goes by the train all?" 



One oj the boats in a water carnival was 
fixed up as a pirate craft, Jolly Roger flying. 
Pointing to the skull ant! cross-bones Papa 
asked Junior, "Can you name that Flag?" 

"Sure," replied the little guy, "iodine." 



Bowlegged guy standing on the curb 
like this ( ), watching a parade. Nervous 
guy behind him finally walked up to the 
bowlegged fellow and shouted, "If you're 
gonna jump, buddy, for the love of Mike, 
JUMP!" 



Sign in a record shop: "Kiss the Girl 
You Love and s< veral other popular num- 
bers." 



Don't look for flaws in others 

And even when you find them, 

It's wise and kind, 

To be a bit blind, 

And look for the virtues behind them. 



Scdly: "Have you < ver been abroad?' 
Sweetie: "Why. yes, all my life." 



Our minds are like fountain-pens — 
neither will work until we put something 
in them. 



Announcement says "Children to sing 
for WBAL." In Grandmaw's day they usi d 
to cry for Castoria. 



Floorwalker: "Are you being taken care 
of, Miss?" 

Sweetie: "That, sir, is none of your 
business!" 




REVEILLE 

"I had a terrible dream. I dreamed I was in 
:lass, making a speech to the whole class". 
"What's so terrible about that?" 
'It WAS terrible! All of a sudden I woke up 
ind there I WAS; making a speech to the whole 
:lass !" 



DRINK 



Wfe 



COFFEE 



~\ 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 



Members 

WASHINGTON STOCK EXCHANGE 

PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



Southern Building 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3131 



115 N. St. Asaph 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



V. 



EASY TERMS— TRADE IMS 

Photo-Movie SaDDlles 

• Free Parking 

• Free Catalog 
Open 9 to G — Thurs. 9 to 9 



Brenner 933 penn.Av e .s 



Opposite Justice Department 
RE. 7-2434 Washington 




r 



Union Welding Co. 

ELECTRIC & ACETYLENE 

ALL METALS WELDED 

We make anything out of metal 

Rear 2231 8th St., N.W. 

DUpont 7-9894 Washington 



A. I.I in; SONS 

COMPANY 

Nurseries 

Over 500 Acres 
ROCKVILLE, MD. 

Office & Landscape Dept. 

1318 EYE STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Phone: NAtional 8-6880 



S. D. MOSES, INC 

Concrete Construction 



817 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtional 8-8586 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 



63 



ARTS & SCIENCES 

(Concluded from page 21) 
Baltimore, Washington. Knoxville and 
Scranton have hold one-man exhibitions 
of his work. 

Mr. Maril will have an exhibition of 
his recent paintings at the Whyte Gal- 
lery. Washington, in January. 1953. 

In Iceland 

Army Sgt. Earl King, who attended 
A&S '49- '51. is serving at Keflavik Airport 
in Iceland as a cook for a unit of the 
Unified Iceland Defense Force, responsible 
for the defense of Iceland and the North 
Atlantic air and sea lanes. He entered the 
Army in January '51. 

In Library of Congress 

Dr. Charles Manning, associate dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences, was chair- 
man of an open conference on "Europe's 
View of America Today" held in the Li- 
brary of Congress. The conference, spon- 
sored by the American Studies Association. 
was in four sessions: I — American Studies 
Programs in European Universities; II — 
Contemporary Western European Atti- 
tudes toward the United States; III — Con- 
temporary America as Seen by European 
Scholars; and IV — Implications of the Con- 
ference for American Studies Programs in 




The Thomsen-Ellis- 
Hutton Company is 
proud to be associated 
with the University 
through the printing of 
the Maryland 
Magazine. 

Thomsen Ellis Hutton Company 

PRIDEMARK PRESS 

418 Water Street at Gay 
Baltimore 2 • Maryland 

LETTERPRESS AND OFFSET PRINTING 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExinston 0020 



the United States and Abroad. Dr. Man- 
ning was chairman of the fourth session. 
Maryland's Dr. Carl Bode, President of 
the American Studies Association, delivered 
the welcoming address in behalf of that 
association. 

Addresses P. T. A. 

Dr. Norman R. Roth of the Department 
of Sociology, addressed the annual lunch- 
eon meeting of the Pupil Personnel Divi- 
sion of the Maryland State Department 
of Education. The meeting was in con- 
junction with the annual meetings of the 
Maryland State Teachers' Association. 
Dr. Roth discussed the topic, "Perspec- 
tives in Pupil Personnel Work." 

Addresses Tri Delts 

Miss Tipton Stringer (A&S '52), '51 
Homecoming Queen, was guest speaker at 
the Washington Alumnae Delta Delta 
Delta founder's day banquet at Wal- 




Daniel Kaufman. Alfred S. Kidwell. G. M. 
Kline, Joseph S. Lann. Henry F. Lederle. 
D. C. Lichtenwalner. Honsden L. Marshall. 
Samuel McFarlane. Herbert Myers. Selmer 
W. Peterson. Robert E. Plapinger. Mr. & 
Mrs. R. K. Preston. Ed Price, James F. 
Roth, L. H. Schwartzman, Daniel Swern, 
Samuel C. Temin, Charles J. A. Volz. Ben- 
ton B. Westfall. Mark W. Westgate, Roy 
G. Weston, Don Wheeler. John K. Wolfe, 
Edmond G. Young and John A. Yourtee. 



Faculty Club 

The first Faculty Club fireside discus- 
sion of the semester took place at Ros~- 
borough when Professor Sumner 0. Bur- 
hoe of the Zoology Department spoke on 
"The Genetics of Civilization." Guests of 
members of the Club are cordially invited 
to all faculty club discussions. 

At the second fireside discussion Dr. 
Adolph E. Zucker spoke on "Liberals 



CUT IT OUT NOW!" | 



xv secretary, alumni assoc! 

:•:¥: university of Maryland, college park, md. 



>!v Enclosed herewith is $ my contribution to 

;•;•> the Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to 

:■:•: "Maryland'' for one year. 



ter Reed Officers' Club. Tippy discussed 
her recent U.S.O. trip to Europe. 

Speaks on "Homer" 

Dr. Herbert Schaumann, assistant pro- 
fessor of English, spoke on Homer at the 
Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore. Dr. 
Schaumann is working on a verse transla- 
tion of Homer's Iliad. 

At Atlantic City 

Dr. Charles E. White '23 always finds 
time to send notes concerning Chemistry 
graduates and their activities. His latest 
concerns a luncheon of Maryland alumni, 
faculty and graduate students at an Amer- 
ican Chemical Society meeting in Atlantic 
City. Among those present were Paul M. 
Ambrose, Harry D. Anspon, Frederick L. 
Bach, Ronald F. Brown. Homer W. Car- 
hart, Frank G. Carpenter, D. Harry Cham- 
bers. Franklin S. C. Chang, Eiler B. Cooke, 
Robert M. Creamer. Robert S. Doyle, 
Harry M. Duvall, W. M. Eareckson. A. I. 
Flenner. Mrs. Winifred Flenner. John A. 
Garman, George W. Gibble, Samuel Gold- 
hagen, Lem Goldman. Robert A. Hayes, 



Under Hitler" and Professor Eitel W. 
Dobert spoke on "Liberals in Germany 
Today." 



Cr on kite Lecture 

Students of Speech at Maryland recently 
heard talks from prominent men in radio 
and TV fields. 

Walter Cronkite. of the CBS radio and 
TV news bureau, spoke of the opportuni- 
ties open to college students in radio, news 
work and TV. 

Mr. Cronkite. who is news commentator 
for WTOP-TV, covered the national con- 
ventions for the Columbia Broadcasting 
System. He told the classes of various ex- 
periences and problems which confronted 
him in connection with coverage of the 
conventions. 

Codv Pfanstiehl, director of public rela- 
tions for WTOP and' WTOP-TV, told the 
class of the opportunities, pay and general 
requirements in the field of public relations. 

Pfanstiehl also spoke of the role of the 
press and the methods of promotion in 
both radio and TV. 



64 




Welcome HOME, Sergeant! 




A Telephone Family in Chicago. Sergeant Donald 
Mclntvre got a real family welcome from his sister, 
Mary, a Service Representative; his mother, who was 
an Operator for seven years; and his brother, Angus, a 
Plant Assigner. Sergeant Mclntyre's father was also 
a telephone man. 



Sergeant Donald Mclntvre, former telephone 
installer, returned home from Korea a few months 
ago. He served with the 1st Marine Division and was 
twice awarded the Purple Heart. 

He was welcomed back to his telephone job, of 
course. But in a certain sense he had never been 
away. For his new pay check reflected the increases 
he would have received on his old job if he had not 
joined the Marines. 

There are some 16,000 other Bell Telephone 
men and women now in the service who will receive 
a similar warm welcome on their return home. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM ..."A GOOD PLACE TO WORK" 





All 12 offices 

OPEN SATURDAY 

MORNING 

until 12 noon 



FOR 



YOUR 



CONVENIENCE 



XHE^ 12 BANKING 



OFFICES 



•Regular Checking Accounts 

•Special Checking Accounts 

•Savings Accounts 

•Christmas Savings Clubs 

•Travelers Checks 

• Safe Deposit Boxes 

•Night Depository 

• Trust Services 

• Personal Loans 

• Business Loans 
•Collateral Loans 

•Automobile Loans 

•Insurance Loans 

• Home Improvement 

& Modernization Loans 



Are you hard pressed for time in these busy days? Find it difficult to get every- 
thing done? The convenience of our 12 locations may help you, as it helps 
thousands to save time and trouble in connection with every kind of banking 
and trust need. 

Our banking hours, too, are especially planned for your convenience . . . and 
there's free parking for you at or near each of our 12 offices . . . plus modern 
Drive-In Windows to serve you at the Flower Avenue and 
New Hampshire Avenue locations. 

Why not select our office which is most convenient 
for you, and enjoy the friendliest, most helpful 
service while saving time and trouble? 

Suburban Trust Company 

A Strong, friendly Bank 




SILVER SPRING, MD. 

8252 Georgia Ave. JUniper 5-1000 
College Park, Md. — 7360 Baltimore Ave. 
Greenbelt, Md. — 25 Crescent Rd. 
White Oak, Md. — Naval Ordnance Laboratory 
West Hyattsville, Md. — 5416 Queens Chapel Rd. 
6842 New Hampshire Ave — Takoma Park, Md. 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

5214 Baltimore Ave. UNion 4-7500 
Bethesda, Md. — 4600 East- West Highway 
8722 Flower Ave.— (And Piney Branch Rd.) 
Mt. Rainier, Md. — 3716 Rhode Island Ave. 
Takoma Park, Md. — Carroll & Willow Aves. 
Whealon, Md. — 11427 Georgia Ave. 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





THE OLDEST STATE FLAG 



■EYED SUSAN, 
TE FLOWER 




50 cents the copy, $3 the yeor 




For Modern Plumbing & Heating 

We offer the finest quality in wholesale 

PLUMBING & HEATING SUPPLIES 
PIPE • VALVES • FITTINGS 

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIFICATIONS 
AVAILABLE FOR ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS 




Visit Our Complete, Modern 

PLUMBING and HEATING SHOWROOM 

1206 K Street, N.W., • Washington, D. C. 



WAREHOUSES 

4th & Channing Sts., N.E. 
1206-8 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



NEW BRANCH 

8216 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring 
Maryland 



BRANCH 

1680 Clough Street 

Baltimore 

Maryland 



R. D. Watson, President — Class 1917 



•iamks a. >ii;ssi;i5 company 




ALEX. BROWN 6? SONS 




ESTABLISHED 1800 




America's Oldest Name in Investment Banking 



WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE HEADED THE GROUP OF UNDERWRITERS 
WHICH SUCCESSFULLY DISTRIBUTED 



$3,850,000 





Revenue QcmcJU 

THE PROCEEDS OF WHICH ARE TO BE USED TO CONSTRUCT 

THE AUDITORIUM 

TEN FRATERNITY and SORORITY HOUSES 

STUDENT UNION BUILDING 




ALEX. BROWN &> SONS 

Members New York Stock Exchange and other leading Exchanges 

BALTIMORE 
NEW YORK WASHINGTON WINSTON-SALEM 



[i 



Vol. XXIV 



March-April 1953 



No. 3 




^^«;&^ 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, 
and entered at the Post Office. College Park, Md., as 
second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of 
March 3, 1879. S3. 00 per year Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10, Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 



General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Lee W. Adkins '42. Abram Z. 

Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Marjorie R. Wharton '41, C. G. Donovan '17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Norman Sinclair '43, Harry A. Boswell, Jr. '42, 

Roger L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Harry Levin '26, C. Clifton Coward 

*23, Arthur I. Bell '19. 
EDUCATION— E. Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart 

McCaw '35, Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING— S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mary R. Lankford '26, 

Mary S. Humelsine '39, Hilda Jones Nystrom 

'32. 
LAW — C. Ferdinand Sybert '25, G. Kenneth 

Reiblich '29, John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL— Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurston 

R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY— Frank Block '24, Frank Black *04, 

Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING— Flora Street '38, Eva Darley '27, 

June E. Geiser '47. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Charles W. Sylvester '08. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly '21. 
"M" CLUB— Albert B. H-agy '30. 
NEW ENGLAND— Dr. Walter S. Longo '22. 
NEW YORK— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Gordon Kessler '29. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Egbert Tingley '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher '45. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — T. T. Speer '17 
University President — Dr. H. C. Byrd *08 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham '38 



HAWKINS 
GLASS COMPANY 

Mirrors 

Made to Order 

Furniture Tops 

REAR 1216 N. CAPITOL STREET 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

MEtropolitan 8-4520 



C^dito 



rials 



HARVEY L. MILLER 

Editor 



Rich Man's Example 

Easter time generally brings a spate of 
editorials about the rebirth of nature, 
the first crocus poking its head through a 
blanket of snow, such phenomena of nature 
hailed as contemporaneous to a spiritual 
rebirth brought about by the observance, 
at this season, of Jesus' resurrection from 
the tomb. 

The crucifixion of the Nazarene marked 
the darkest hour and the lowest ebb of 
morale for all of his followers. 

Over and over again it has been empha- 
sized that the followers of Jesus were poor 
people, humble fisherfolk and others 
equally obscure and lowly. 

The hunt was on. The high and mighty 
had prosecuted and persecuted a Gentle 
Man of high ideals to the extent of nailing 
him to a cross between two thieves. Many 
of his followers adduced that His cause 
was lost. He was dead. He had failed. 
His cause — their cause — had failed. 

The powerful, the mighty and the poli- 
l icians had made an example of the Man 
who walked among the poor and lowly; 
the Teacher who had so often made refer- 
( nee to and eulogized the poor. 

And so even Peter, a man who, later, 
through inspiration and faith, became the 
staunchest disciple and the bravest martyr, 
denied that he even knew Jesus! Another 
disciple betrayed him for a pediculous 
handful of silver. 

At his tomb remained only humble and 
lowly Magdalen. The rest had made them- 
selves scarce. 

Then came the wondrous Easter miracle 
that began the projection of the ideals of 
the Humble Carpenter to all corners of 
the world for all time. In recognition, all 
Christendom, with the faith that makes 
the faltering hopes of mankind more at- 
tainable, participates in the exaltation that 
comes with Easter. 

The Humble Man who taught humility 
became the greatest influence for good this 
world has ever known. To accomplish that 
many of the wealthy and influential had to 
become followers of the Great Idealist. 

So for Easter '53 let's pay tribute to the 
first of these. Remember that, in that 
darkest hour, it was dangerous and suicidal 
to be known as a disciple of the Man on 
the Cross. It required great fortitude to 
do that. In that premise it is well to 
recall Joseph of Arimathea. a rich, proud 
man. He was a follower of Christ, indis- 
putably a man of high courage and con- 
victions. 

When darkness descended over the dis- 
mal Friday and the Nazarene's people 
lurked and hid in the shadows of Jerusa- 
lem's side streets, Joseph of Arimathea, 
"went boldly unto Pilate and craved the 
body of Jesus." The situation required a 
man of influence and position to secure 
the granting of such a request. Joseph's 
request granted, he bought the fine linens 



only a man of wealth could afford, took 
the poor broken body down from the 
cross and away from public view, placing 
it "in a sepulchre wherein never man be- 
fore was laid." 

That was all Joseph of Arimathea could 
do. It was enough to show that this Man 
was a King, fit to be put away like a mon- 
arch, wrapped in the linens of royalty, 
in a tomb never before used. 

With that Joseph accomplished some- 
thing indescribably brave and big, for he, 
a man of wealth, stood to lose all his 
wealth, even his life, by his actions. No 
doubt he knew this. Very likely he lived 
in deep seated fear but he did what his 
heart and head commanded him to do. 

It is reasonable to adduce that, during 
his lifetime this wealthy man did much to 
better the lots of the poor and lowly. 

Joseph of Arimathea! He was the 
FIRST rich man to teach the world the 
inspiring lesson of selfless devotion and 
clean-white courage. It is encouraging to 
believe that in the crises .which, down 
through the corridor of years have crashed 
upon the heads of decent people from the 
Hill of Skulls to 1953. there usually come 
forth men of the stature and decency of 
Joseph of Arimathea. 



Cover Design 

Our cover design, showing the various in- 
signae of the State of Maryland comes 
to us from "Tile and Till," the publica- 
tion of the Eli Lilly Company, of Indi- 
anapolis, Ind., as a part of their "Parade 
of States" series. 

The following data was prepared by the 
State's Hall of Records for the Depart- 
ment of Information, viz: — 

Maryland State Flag 

Maryland's flag bears the arms of the 
Calvert and Crossland families. Calvert 
was the family name of the Lords Balti- 
more who founded Maryland. Crossland 
was the family of the mother of the first 
Lord Baltimore. The escutcheon or shield 
in the Maryland Seal bears the same arms. 
This flag seems to have been used from 
the beginning of the colony, although it 
was not adopted officially until recently. 

The Great Seal 

The Great Seal of Maryland is used by 
the Governor and the Secretary of State 
to authenticate the Acts of the Legislature 
and for other official purposes. The first 
Great Seal was brought over during the 
early days of the Colony. It was very 
much like the one on the cover and it 
remained in use. although slightly altered, 
until the Revolution. The State of Mary- 
land adopted a new seal similar in form 
and spirit to those of the other states. 
After the passage of a hundred years, 
Maryland readopted its old seal in 1876. 
Only the Reverse of this seal has ever 
been cut. The Obverse is, however, still 
considered as part of the seal and is used, 
among other things, for decorating public 
buildings. 

The Obverse of the Seal shows Lord Bal- 
timore as a Knight in full armor mounted 
on a charger. The inscription translated 
from Latin into English is "Cecilius Abso- 
lute Lord of Maryland and Avalon, Baron 
(Editorials Continued on page 14) 



[2] 



1!% ©lii ffitur 





»t\U luilim!" 

LARGEST AIR FORCE ROTC 

University of Maryland ROTC Air Force Training Program in Keeping 
with Proud History of Patriotic Service of State and University 




Tin- fad thai the 
University o f 
M a r y 1 a n <1 sponsors 
America's largest Air 
Force ROTC is quite 
in keeping with both 
die practical and po- 
etic traditions of the 
Old Line State. 

It is pari of the pol- 
icy of the University 
to maintain its posi- 
tion in the forefront 
of modern develop- 
ment in all lines of study without sur- 
rendering reverence for the history of the 
State as one of the thirteen original col- 
onies. 

As "American as Maryland" 

Thus, required instruction in American 
Civilization occupies its place in the cur- 
riculum along with instruction in the latest 
developments in Air Science and Tactics. 
There is scant opportunity for mixed met- 
aphors in referring to the University's 
stand on Americanism for the University 
is truly ''as American as Maryland." 

The University's Memorial Chapel is 
dedicated to the hundreds of former Mary- 
land students who gave their lives in their 
country's services. The list of these hon- 
ored dead includes the names of some of 
Maryland's most brilliant students as well 
as some of the University's greatest ath- 
letes, their names associated, down through 
the corridor of years, with such scenes of 
action as Belleau "Wood. Soissons. Bataan's 
Death March, the flak-studded skies over 
Berlin, the Burma Road, and Korea's 
Tnchon. 

Such "last full measures of devotion" 
are quite in keeping with the early colonial 
incidi nt which won for Maryland troops 
the accolade "The Old Liners." During 
the Battle of Long Island the Continental 
troops were being sorely pressed by the 
enemy. The left and right flanks were 
being driven back and the command was 
given to drop back and establish a new 
line. 

"The Old Line Holds!" 

However, Colonel Smallwood, com- 
manding a Maryland outfit, noting that 
the center of the line did not recede, ex- 
claimed. "See. the old line holds!" 

The flanks fought back to abreast of 
the Maryland position and from that time 
on Colonial troops of the various states 
referred to the Marylanders as "The Old 
Liners." 

Action at sea showed Marylanders keep- 
ing pace with Old Line soldiers. The 
British referred to Baltimore harbor as 
the "Hornet's Nest" and Ft. McHenry 



withstood bombardment as a Marylander 
wrote our National Anthem. 

That the Old Line still holds, true to the 
old traditions but in ultra modern style, 
is evinced by Maryland's Air Force ROTC, 
a part of the Air University, which, when 
it assumed responsibility for the AFROTC 
program in 1952, initiated a vigorous pro- 
grain to break down the time honored 
barriers that specialists should and could 
In turned out of the AFROTC program. 
who required little or no indoctrination 
when they went into active military serv- 
ice. 

Modifications 

The Air Force, at the outset, has been 
using the specialized theme of instruction 
designed very much along the lines of the 
Army Arms and Services. This meant that 
the USAF was turning out a half trained 
specialist and a half trained officer. The 
problem which then confronted the Air 
Force was. which could be trained more 
efficiently in the Colleges and Univcrsi- 
ties; the specialist or the officer? Due to 
the peculiar technical nature of the Air 
Force, the answer was obvious. The offi- 
cer could not only be trained easier in the 
Colleges, but the course could be so de- 
signed as to fit into his academic program. 
In addition, with a little modification the 
training of young students to realize their 
citizenship responsibilities could very 
easily be accommodated. 

The first task confronting the Air Uni- 
versity was to re-establish and lemodify. 
if necessary, the general thinking of just 
what was required of the program and 
what form of curriculum could be devised 
to fit its needs. 

Pertinent Points 

The following points were considered as 
most pertinent: The curriculum should be 
based on a mission and objectives which 
accurately reflect the needs of the Air 
Force, are clearly and concisely stated, 
and are attainable. It should be practical, 
and therefore, should take into considera- 
tion such factors as general capability of 
instructor personnel available, amount of 
time available for instruction, instructional 
space, and facilities generally available. 
Other factors considered were experience, 
knowledge, and civilian status of students, 
academic programs offered to students at 
the respective schools, time available to 
students for instruction and study, and 
security clearance of students. 

The course of instruction should be 
readily adaptable to institutional program 
changes and to new developments within 
the Air Force. The entire program should 
provide a sequential balanced pattern of 
instruction throughout its academic and 



non-academic phase. It should incorporate 
subject matter which is both current and 
timely and provides for learning situa- 
tions, which closely parallel actual situa- 
tions. It should be so devised as to main- 
tain student interest and it must be gen- 
eiallv acceptable to those Colleges and 
Universities offering AFROTC. One of 
the most important aspects of this pro- 
gram is to insure that those students who 
do not elect to take advantage of the 
benefits of the advanced course are aware 
of their responsibilities as future citizens, 
and in many instances as future enlisted 
men and officers of the Armed Forces. 

New Curriculum 

The understanding and support of these 
students will be of long range value to 
the Air Force. Therefore, the purposes, 
problems, and capabilities of the Air Force 
should be presented to the student early 
in the course. Faced with this herculean 
task the Air University curriculum plan- 
ning group was directed to develop a new 
generalized curriculum with the following 
as its guide: 

To select from the broad field of mili- 
tary science and tactics a body of train- 
ing materials and organize it into a 
course of study designed to utilize the 
limited time available for Air Force 
ROTC instruction to develop in the 
student to the highest degree possible, 
those understandings, attitudes, skills, 
and attributes of leadership considered 
essential in the development of all Air 
Force commissioned officers. 

Necessary Minimums 

Under the broad terms of this working 
definition the curriculum group surveyed 
the fields of military science and tactics 
and selected a body of materials which 
seemed to fall within these established 
limits. Following this preliminary selec- 
tion, tentative time requirements were 
agreed upon as minimums necessary for 
development of the various subjects. Defi- 
nite blocks of materials with specified 
hour allotments were then selected in the 
order of their agreed importance, until 
the total time authorized for the course 
was used. 

Selected materials were then checked 
against the USAF directive to assure com- 
pliance with its provisions. In tin- selec- 
tion of materials to be included in the 
curriculum, especially with regards in se- 
quence, certain basii' principles and as- 
sumptions were considered. The Air Force 
ROTC curriculum must be college level 
in content, scope, intensity, and presenta- 
tion. It should be subject only to the 
limitation imposed by the fact that most 



[3] 






...because 
every 




Maryland's Oldest and ?j 
& Largest Furrier & 

I BALTIMORE | 

^■»3«c »x« ;;x;< ?;x« >;x^ ^ 

FOR EXPERT REMODELING, CLEANING 

AND STORAGE 

CALL LExington 4900 



Williams 

Construction 

Company 

Grading 

Concrete & 

Macadam Paving 

Phone: Essex 1310 
BALTIMORE 20, MD. 



King Bros. Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotoga 5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 3, MD. 



students will have had no previous instruc- 
tions in either military concepts or mate- 
rial. 

This insures that AFROTC courses will 
be granted the same accreditation as other 
courses on the same division level. The 
course of study should be so designed as 
to minimize opportunities to indoctrinate 
and prepare students to undertake flying 
training. In the long range plan the pri- 
mary reason for an Air Force in being is 
to provide personnel and equipment to 
keep the primary weapon of the Air Force 
aloft, the "Airplane". In addition, the 
course of study should be so designed as 
to appeal to the widest possible variety of 
academic fields of interest so as to be 
attractive to students regardless of their 
major field of study. 

Early Training Needed 

The Air Force being the technical arm; 
that is, it must attract the best calibre of 
science and engineering students. But 
more important is the fact that many stu- 
dents are lost by economic, academic, or 
forced attrition before their junior year, 
therefore, the freshman and sophomore 
years should provide a training experience 
useful from the Air Force viewpoint to 
these students. The basic course, therefore, 
should present materials nowhere else 
available in the institutional curriculum, 
which are designed primarily to establish 
an optimum foundation for the develop- 
ment of an Air Force commissioned officer 
and secondarily to develop in the student 
an awareness and understanding of Armed 
Forces procedures. 

Along with this, the advanced course 
which is the optional elective phase of the 
commissioning program, should present 
materials nowhere else available in the 
college curriculum which are designed pri- 
marily to develop an Air Force commis- 
sioned officer with high growth potential, 
and secondarily to produce a second lieu- 
tenant prepared to enter immediately, 
either into the specialized and technical 
training program of the Air Force schools 
or on-the-job training positions in fields 
closely allied to their major field of aca- 
demic study. Behind this last thought 
was the fact that since the great majority 
of these young men would serve for a 
limited time only it would be to the mu- 
tual benefit of both the individual and 
the Air Force to permit, where possible, 
the utilization of this officer in a field 
where he would eventually make his way 
upon release from active duty. 

Good Educators 

This means that instead of requiring 

intensive training to bring him up to 
standard in the event he was called upon 
to serve in the future he would have ex- 
perience gained in his civilian pursuits. 
To give this new curriculum the credence 
it would need the Air Force called upon 
some of the finest educators in the coun- 
try to assist them in this project. In- 
cluded among these were, Dr. Arthur 
Adams, President of the American Council 
of Education, Dr. Blake Van Keer, Presi- 
dent of the ■ Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology, and Father John Kavanaugh of 
Notre Dame. In addition, a committee 
composed of 21 University officials selected 



by the American Council of Education 
acted as a review board. 

Bold Thinking 

After these learned educators reviewed 
the plan, then and then only was it submit- 
ted to the various Major Air Commands to 
insure that it fits the needs of all con- 
cerned. With this bold change in thinking 
on the part of the Air Force educators, 
this new curriculum should go far in satis- 
fying the mission of the AFROTC pro- 
gram which is to select and prepare stu- 
dents through a permanent program of 
instruction at civilian educational institu- 
tions to serve as officers in the Regular 
and Reserve components of the Air Force 
and to assist in discharging where neces- 
sary, any institutional obligation to offer 
instruction in military training. In addi- 
tion, this curriculum will aid greatly in 
providing a basis of selecting students for 
the advanced course, and when practicable, 
for the basic course, who are potentially 
best qualified to serve as officers of the 
USAF. 

This new generalized course will also 
serve to better arouse in the students a 
desire to serve in the flying end of the Air 
Force as officers and it is hoped it will 
develop in the students those attributes of 
leadership, personality, and character, 
which are essential to an officer of the Air 
Force. The following are the main points 
which each graduate will carry away with 
him upon graduation from the program: 

Main Points 

Understand why our national and inter- 
national defense structures are necessary. 
Be acquainted with historical develop- 
ment and principal functions of each 
component of the National Military Es- 
tablishment. 

Understand his moral and statuatory 
obligations for service within the nation- 
al Military Establishment. 
Be acquainted with career fields open to 
officers of the USAF, and with the per- 
sonal and professional opportunities of a 
career as a USAF officer, understand the 
characteristics and capabilities of air 
power as an instrument of war and the 
role of air forces in land, sea, and air 
campaigns. 

Be acquainted with the principal wea- 
pons, aircraft, operational factors, and 
organizational units which the USAF 
employs in accomplishing its functions. 
Be acquainted with the responsibilities 
and duties which are assigned to junior 
officers within the USAF career field(s) 
which correspond(s) to his academic 
specialization. 

Be acquainted with areas of knowledge 
which are especially pertinent to officers 
on duty in the USAF. This should in- 
clude such subjects as Weather, Air Nav- 
igation, Aerodynamics and Propulsion, 
World Political Geography and its re- 
lation to air power, Military Manage- 
ment, Military Law, Personality and 
Leadership and The Air Force Base. 

From 1863 

The ROTC program of the Armed 
Forces of the United States was first con- 
ceived in brief by the Land Grant Act of 
1863. It was further augmented by the 
(Concluded on page 64) 



SWISS FAMILY LIFE 



Maryland Girl Student 
Describes Interesting Experi- 
ences with Three Farm 
Families in Switzerland as 
IFYE. 

By Amy Fry, '52 

Following graduation last June, I sailed 
aboard the "Nelly," student travel ship, 
as one of four American farm youth to 
spend five months in Switzerland. A party 
of 90 went abroad on the International 
Farm Youth Exchange Program to live 
and work as members of farm families in 
host countries. 

In Switzerland, a country just one and 
a half times as large as Maryland with 
five million people, we lived with three 
families for a period of approximately six 
weeks each. 

Not Like Maryland 

Swiss family life differs from ours in 
Maryland. While city people of Switzer- 
land have most of the same advantages 
and opportunities as Americans, the farmer 
still lives a peasant's existence. The aver- 
age farm is about 15 acres. The family 
and one or two hired men do all of the 
work. During the summer months the 
women spend most of their time in the 
fields. My three host families were won- 
derful. The first farm was one of 150 
acres and, since it was large, the techniques 
were quite Americanized. This farmer had 
40 Brown Swiss cows, two American trac- 
tors, and much more equipment than the 
average farmer. While with the Zust fam- 
ily, I spent a lot of time picking fruit, 
helping in the well equipped and practical 
kitchen, and even helped pitch hay on sev- 
eral occasions. My hosts could speak some 
English, so I had an opportunity to learn 
quite a few things about the country, 
schools and life in general in a Swiss com- 
munity. 




LIVED WITH SWISS 

"We saw Switzerland as no tourist will ever 
see it," writes Amy Fry, '52, pictured above. 



Mrs. Zust was very interested in teach- 
ing me their homemaking. She had six 
small children and gave me opportunities 
to care for them, help prepare family 
meals and do some of the mending. One 
of my nicest assignments was making a 
costume of the Canton of Zurich for my- 
self. As I made my costume I tried to 
adapt my methods to those- used in Swiss 
children's costumes, but found them quite 
different from ours. Most of the sewing 
is done in winter, because then the women 
have time for such activities. 

No Cotton 

Swiss homes use linen ; bed linens, 
aprons and tablecloths, because cotton 
does not grow in Switzerland. Everything 
used in cooking grows on the farm, except 
coffee, spices, rice, etc. Their farms are 
nearly self-sustaining since the terrific food 
shortage in World War II. 

My second hosts were more of an aver- 
age family. They owned 50 acres, mostly 
in potatoes. Marianne Hofer, the oldest 
daughter, was my age and chatted with 
me nearly constantly while I was there. 
Most of my time in the fields was spent 
picking up potatoes, but we did many in- 
teresting things indoors also. One day we 
were to bake bread. That was interesting! 
As the fire was getting hot in the stone 
oven, I rolled out nine pie crusts. Three 
of these pies were 39 inches in diameter 
and the other six were about 18 inches. 
The filling was of fruit and custard, and 
then they were ready to bake. We brushed 
the hot coals out of the oven and put in 
the pies. As they baked Marianne and I 
prepared thirty loaves of bread, which 
were placed right on the stone to bake 
for 1% hours. The Swiss don't use bread 
pans or forms. The round loaves of dough 
are baked dirctly on the stone oven. For 
lunch we had the usual clear soup, fol- 
lowed by pie and pie and, also pie! 

While with the Hofer family I had 
hoped to see their rural youth organiza- 
tion but was disappointed to learn that 
Switzerland has no organization for farm 
youth. They need it. I was pleased to 
hear later, that Peter Hofer has organized 
a club along the lines of Older Youth 
work as in the United States. 

Vineyard Farm 

My third farm was the smallest, but 
was very interesting. The Obrecht family 
had twenty acres, ten in vineyards. Their 
main enterprise was the production of 
grapes for wine and the bottling of it. 
This was new to me. It was very inter- 
esting and so was the life in a mountain 
village. Jenins, where the Obrecht 's lived 
was right in the Heidi mountains, where 
the legendary story Heidi was written. 

After living and working with the three 
Swiss families we spent a few days in 
Zurich, summarizing our experiences with 
our hosts and the people of the Swiss gov- 
ernment with whom we had worked. We 
concluded that there is very little we can 
learn, technically, from these friends. How- 
ever, we were able to understand why 
things are done as they are, and the reason 
that their life is such a simple and satis- 
(Conduded on page 64) 



Jack Blank 

Invites You To 

T 

Test Drive The New 

1953 
PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade^ 
Pontiac 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 

ADAMS 4-8500 

Washington's Largest 
Pontiac Dealer 



Edward 

Boker 

Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc, 



SERVING 

HOSPITALS 

AND 

INSTITUTIONS 

James T, Doukas, Mgr. 

LAwrence 6-8350 

1480 OKIE ST., N.E. 

WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half Street, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



[5: 



Journalism Building 

The Maryland Press Association lias 
gone on record in demanding a new jour- 
nalism building al the University of 
Mai viand. 

The Association's journalism committee 
recently inspected the journalism depart- 
ment at the university and then voted a 
resolution condemning the facilities as "in- 
adequate and outmoded." It also asked 
that the university offer a course in news- 
paper advertising. 

The group of publishers on the journal- 
ism committee included: 

Elmer M. Jackson, chairman, and gen- 
eral manager of the Annapolis Capital- 
Gazette Press; Neil H. Swanson. executive 
editor of the Baltimore Sunpapers; E. T. 
Gunning, managing editor of the Cumber- 
land Times; and John Coffman, Jr.. pub- 
lisher of the Takoma Journal. Also on 
the committee is E. W. Orcm. publisher 
of the Democrat and News at Cambridge. 
In addition, the publishers moved to 
place in the journalism department's Hall 
of fame, pictures and biographies of the 
following well-known Maryland newsmen 
who died within the past year: 

Michael W. Aker, editor of the Queens- 
town News; Aloysius F. King, editor of 
the St. Mary's Beacon; Paul Patterson, 
presidenl of the A. S. Abell Co.. publisher 
of the Baltimore Sunpapers; and P. G. 
Stromberg, publisher of the Ellicott City 
Times and five other weeklies. 

The publishers commended the Sun- 
papers for making available facilities for 
use as a laboratory by the reporting and 
editing classes in the University's journal- 
ism department. 

They pledged the cooperation of Mary- 
land editors in helping offer this spring 
for the first time, a course in community 
journalism in which the students work 
part-time on nearby weeklies. 

The group inspected new laboratories for 
teaching press photography and other fa- 
cilities. 








A*23./r?c, 



OLD PLANTATION 



"Readbourne," near Centreville, Queen Anne County, 1731, named for George Reade who acquired 

the land in 1659. 



r X 



J J 



READBOURNE 

One of Maryland's Old Planta- 
tions, Maintaining the Beauty 
and Dignity of Colonial Days 

By Sally L. Ogden 

Somewhat different in style from other 
colonial houses in the area. Read- 
bourne, near Centreville in Queen Anne 
County, is more contemporary with the 
first mansions in Virginia than those of 
Maryland. In this respect it is unique. 
But, like many other fine old landmarks 
on Maryland's Eastern Shore, it has a 
varied history of early glory, eventual 
deterioration, and subsequent restoration 
during later years. 




PUBLISHERS MEET AT UNIVERSITY 



A I Daneg ger Foto 



After inspecting journalism facilities at the University, the journalism committee of the Mary- 
land Press Association voted a resolution condemning them as "inadequate and outmoded," and 
demanded that a new building be constructed for the department. 

Left to right, first row: Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, dean of the College of Business & Public Admini- 
stration; Neil H. Swanson, executive editor, Baltimore Sunpapers; James Cook, graduate assistant 
and former U.P. man from Miami, in charge of the reporting and editing laboratories; Dr. Irving 
Raines, associate professor, Business Administration. 

Second row: Alfred Crowell, head of the Department of Journalism & Public Relations; John 
Coffman, Jr., publisher, Takoma Journal; E. T. Gunning, managing editor, Cumberland Times; 
E. M. Jackson, Jr., chairman, general manager of Capital-Gazette Press, Annapolis. Also on the 
committee is E. W. Orem, publisher of the Democrat & News, Cambridge. 



The plantation was named for and by 
the patentee. George Reade, a resident of 
the Eastern Shore, who acquired the land 
grant of 2.000 acres in 1659. From time 
to time the property changed hands, but 
no owner made his home on the place 
until about 1731. when the house was 
built by Colonel James Hollyday and his 
wife, Sarah Covington, widow of Edward 
Lloyd of Wye House. From that time 
until nearly 1900 the estate remained in 
the one family. During this period and 
until 1928 the main house stood little 
changed. But then, except for a few frag- 
ments, most of the interior woodwork was 
removed for installation in another home 
in Delaware and there followed a period 
of decline, during which the house lost 
most of its original character and finish. 
In 1940, however, it was purchased by 
Mr. and Mrs. William Fahnestock, Jr., a 
couple who fortunately understood the 
traditional values of the place, and who 
took upon themselves the task of seeing 
to its restoration. Thus, Readbourne today 
stands preserved in harmonious accord 
with its original setting. 

On the Chester River 

Situated on a ridge forty feet above 
tide water and overlooking the Chester 
River, the house commands a splendid 
view of the surrounding country. It is 
an excellent example of Georgian design 
and, characteristic of the period in which 
it was built, there are a series of terraces 
or "falls" that extend from the house to 
the river. A brick wall enclosing one side 
of the lawn toward the river, dates back 
to the time the house was constructed. 
For many years, it was believed that the 
bricks for the house and wall were brought 
from England. But after the property was 
sold by the Hollydays, wooden molds, 
including curved ones for the coping on 
top of the wall, were discovered, indicating 
that the bricks were made on the premises. 

An unusual feature of the house at 
Readbourne is the ancient English arrange- 
ment of a single depth of rooms. The 
front door, cut into a recessed panel, 
opens into a richly panelled hall with 



6] 



to indicate thai il was probably built as 
a setting for a statue or other large orna- 
ment. Like many of the finer homes of 
the period, the stairway is in a separate 
spare, arising from an "L" beneath one 
of the arches. Behind the right arch is a 
small room which has a door opening 
into the yard. This room was known to 
the Hollydays as the "Stone Step Room" 
because of a stone step down from the 
door. Opening into this room is a closet 
m which there is a secret compartment 
beneath a trap door in the floor, where the 
brick molds were found. 

Tall Chimneys 

On each side of the steeply pitched roof 
are tall chimneys, capped by distinctive 
ornaments. Heavy modillions beneath 
three arches across the end wall. The 
central arch is recessed in such a manner 
wale eaves and dormer windows lend a 
distinctive touch to the outward setting. 
The facade of the mansion is toward the 
west, facing the river, and the design is 
symmetrical. An arched center doorway, 
flanked by large windows on either side, 
is said to be one of the earliest in America. 

The south wing, built about 1791, is in 
the st.yle of that period. During extensive 
alterations in 1947-48. a north wing was 
added, following the style of the addition 
of 1791. Although this wing is somewhat 
longer and wider, the asymmetry is hardly 
noticeable. 

It must have taken several years to 
complete a house the size of Readbouvne, 
but the Hollydays are known to have 
occupied it as early as 1733-34. From 1731, 
and during the period of construction, 
Sarah Covington Hollyday is said to have 
lived on the premises in a structure called 
"The Box", supervising the work while her 
husband was in England purchasing ma- 
terial and supplies. 

Charles Calvert, Planner? 

Another legend at Readbourne is that 
plans for the house were drawn by Charles 
Calvert, fifth Lord Baltimore. Actually, 
there was considerable association between 
Charles and the early owners, inasmuch as 
James Hollyday was his attorney and John 
Hyde, from whom Hollyday purchased the 
estate, was Charles' brother-in-law. Also, 
it is known that Lord Baltimore was in 
Maryland, due to the dispute over the 
Maryland-Pennsylvania line, during the 
tunc construction was going on. Excerpts 
from letters of the period show that 
Charles had a strong interest in architec- 
ture and building materials and that he 
had recently remodeled his own home in 
England. But it is more probable that 
the actual plans for Readbourne were 
drawn by Leonard Hollyday. brother of 
the owner, who had studied architecture 
abroad and is credited with designing 
several homes in the area. Xeverthless, it 
is known that Mrs. Hollyday was in An- 
napolis and other centers at various times 
during the period of Calvert's visit and 
they undoubtedly met and discussed the 
building taking place on the former prop- 
erty of Charles' brother-in-law. Such alter- 
ations in the original plans as he might 
have suggested are not known. Having 
just completed work on his ow-n home, 
however, there is little doubt that he 
offered ideas that influenced the final 
design. 






&i4U(m<f 









A secure future, exceptional opportunities for advancement, 
and a high starting salary await you at Fairchild, if you are 
one of the men we are looking for. We have openings right 
now for qualified engineers and designers in all phases of 
aircraft manufacturing; we need top-notch men to help us in 
our long-range military program: turning out the famous 
C-119 Flying Boxcar and other projects for the U. S. Air Force. 
Fairchild provides paid vacations and liberal health and 
life insurance coverage. We work a 5-day, 40-hour week as a 
base. Premium is paid when longer work week is scheduled. 



■ ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION 

$^F TAI RCH I LD JwuriDim. 



^im 



HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



"An organ breathes in every groove; 
And the full heart's a Psalter 
Rich in deep hymn of gratitude and love." 
HOOD— ODE TO RAE WILSON 

The beautiful organ music in Maryland's new 
chapel is provided by a three manual 
Moller pipe organ. This, and every Mollerorgan 
is built by master craftsmen — unexcelled in 
their field. When your church needs an organ 
remember the name — Moller. 

For information and demonstration, please write: 




(MP 

INCORPORATED 

Renowned for Pipe Organs Since 1875 

HAGERSTOWN MARYLAND 



Scott's Perennial Gardens 



PERENNIALS & ANNUALS 


PHONE 


PANSY PLANTS 


CHRYSANTHEMUMS 


ROSLYN 


Giant Strain 


Field Grown 


991-W 


Plain & Mixed Colors 



LI BERTY RD. at H A R R I S O N V I L L E — R A N D A L L S T O W N, MP. 



[7: 



DOMINICAN WORKSHOP 

University of Maryland Physical Education Group Establishes 

Groundwork for Development of this Field in Dominican 

Republic Educational Systems 



When representatives of the Dominican 
Republic consulted with officials of 
Maryland's College of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health for assistance in 
the evaluation and improvement of the 
Dominican Republic's public school physi- 
cal education program, the initial discus- 
sions made it apparent that real assistance 
could not be made without on-the-spot 
analysis of the physical education program 
carried on in that country. A trip to the 
Dominican Republic was made by 
Dean Lester M. Fraley for the purpose of 
observing the program and evaluating it. 
For a week, government officials under 
the direction of Doctor Joaquin Balaguer, 
Secretary of State for Public Education 
served as escorts and guides for numerous 
visits to schools throughout the capital, 
Ciudad Trujillo, and expeditions to out- 
lying cities and villages. During this in- 
spection it was possible to gain a reason- 
ably good understanding of the status of 
physical education facilities, equipment 
and teaching methods and, to a greater 
extent, the contents of the program. 

Development Needed 

With the exception of a few schools, 
mainly in the capital itself, physical edu- 
cation was manifestly in a generally low 
state of development. On the basis of this 
survey, it was recommended to the educa- 
tional officials of the Republic that: (1) 
the plans for the many new schools which 
are to be built in the near future be modi- 
fied to include adequate facilities for physi- 
cal education and (2) the teachers now in 
service be provided with a workshop prior 
to the beginning of a new school year in 
order that they might be better equipped 
to conduct a more satisfactory physical 
education program within the limitations 
of the existing conditions. Both sugges- 
tions were adopted on an official basis and 
measures were taken to instrument them. 

Review of the history of the newly 
awakened Dominican Republic reveals the 
reasons for both the relatively poor physi- 
cal education programs and the eagerness 
on the part of the government to improve 
the situation. 

Columbus Landed Here 

The Republic has existed as a modern, 
progressive and industrially growing coun- 
try only since the election of the recently 
retired President Rafael Trujillo, a matter 
of a little more than twenty years — in spite 
of the fact that it was here that Columbus 
first landed and that the first cathedral 
and first university in the Western Hemis- 
phere were built. 

The government set about evolving a 
modern country of educated people, well- 
planned and attractive cities, and an inten- 
sive program of agriculture and industry. 
In order to achieve these objectives the 



University of Santa Domingo was rebuilt 
into a handsome and modern center of 
learning, many intelligent young people 
were sent from the Republic to study in 
the United States and other countries, and 
a large number of experts in various fields 
were imported to study conditions, to 
build, to recommend and to teach. 

Establishment of universal education by 
fiat is an ambitious move of considerable 
proportions. The obtaining of qualified 
teachers poses a major problem. Young 
people just out of the 13th grade and with 
comparatively little in the way of teacher 
training background were sent out into the 
schools to teach. However, with the assist- 
ance of in-service training programs, illiter- 
acy dropped tremendously. 

Maryland Personnel 

The physical education workshop con- 
ducted by the University of Maryland 
group, composed of Dean L. M. Fraley. 
Drs. Janet A. Wessel, Dorothy Mohr, 
Benjamin H. Massey and Warren 
R. Johnson, was designed as in-service 
training to accommodate virtually all of 
the public school physical education 
teachers in the Dominican Republic. 

In addition to experienced teachers in 
attendance, there was a large group of 
youngsters about to go out on their first 
jobs at the beginning of the present school 
year. 

Many of these people were from the 
larger cities; others were to teach in coun- 
try villages (country teachers are paid 
more than city teachers — plainly an in- 
ducement to get teachers into the rural 
areas). Some were to teach on the elemen- 
tary level, others on the secondary, and 
still others on both levels. The workshop 
leaders had the job of introducing these 
teachers to a broad program of activities 
suitable for all grades, to teach them how 
to teach the activities and how to build 
good programs for their particular schools. 

Baseball Popular 

The first two weeks of the workshop 
were devoted entirely to secondary level 
physical education. One hundred students 
attended this session. Although baseball 
is an extremely popular spectator sport in 
the Dominican Republic and is played by 
virtually all young men and boys, other 
U.S. games were little known. Conse- 
quently, the basic kind of instruction was 
necessary in virtually all of our sports, 
group games, track and field events and 
rhythmics. 

In spite of the fact that the Dominicans 
love to dance, frequently learn to do so 
almost as soon as they are able to walk, 
and perform their own native ballroom 
and other Caribbean and South American 
dances with great skill, there appears to 



have been very little effort to introduce 
dancing widely as a physical education 
activity. 

It was strange indeed to see the young 
men and women dance the complicated 
rumba, merengue, samba and mamba steps 
with effortless grace only to be baffled, a 
few moments later, by a basic waltz step, 
La Raspa or an allemand left. They took 
to these and all of our other American 
activities with the enthusiasm of profes- 
sionally minded people who were deter- 
mined to learn all that they could. 

Dr. Balaguer, Secretary of State for 
Public Education and all available person- 
nel of the education department witnessed 
a practical demonstration of all sports and 
games taught during the two weeks. The 
demonstrations were arranged in such a 
way that the visitors had an opportunity 
to observe all students participating in and 
directing the activities they had learned. 

Excellent Program 

Surprising progress had been made in 
such skills as basketball, Softball, speedball, 
soccer, touch football, deck tennis, paddle 
tennis, badminton, volleyball, conditioning 
activities, gymnastics and pyramid build- 
ing. Moreover, by this time one of the 
native teachers was able to call, with con- 
siderable skill, for the Virginia Reel and 
other similar line, circle and square dances 
as a part of the demonstration program. 

All verbal instruction had to be adminis- 
tered through interpreters. None of the 
teaching staff could speak Spanish. By 
holding verbal instructions to a minimum 
and employing demonstrations and dia- 
grams whenever possible, comparatively 
smooth techniques of communication were 
established. 

At the beginning of the third week of the 
workshop an additional one hundred stu- 
dents joined the workshop group. These 
were classroom teachers in elementary 
schools brought in by the government be- 
cause their responsibilities presumably in- 
clude teaching elementary physical educa- 
tion. The third week was devoted entirely 
to elementary physical education activities 
and a wide variety of recreational games. 
It was evident from the beginning that it 
was the first time that the students were 
introduced to the concept of progressions 
of skills in the various activities and sys- 
tematic program planning. 

Search for Leaders 

During the course of the three week 
period, the Maryland group attempted to 
identify individuals among the workshop 
participants who showed knowledge of 
group dynamics, and who had exceptional 
aptitudes and leadership' ability. A num- 
ber of outstanding men and women 
were selected to receive appointments as 
supervisors with the responsibility of mov- 
ing about in the various areas of the 
Republic and offering guidance and assist- 
ance to the regular teachers. 

The Maryland group was deeply im- 
pressed by the spirit of the Dominican 
people with whom they came in contact. 
They obviously held Americans in high re- 
gard as a fabulously advanced people. Ap- 
parent was their wish to emulate American 
ways. They welcomed new sports, rhyth- 



tnics and other physical education activi- 
ties which had no roots in their own 
cultural heritage. 

The Dominican educational officials 
sought Maryland's aid in the making of 
plans for future expansion and improve- 
ment of physical education and public 
recreation. The blue prints of the tremen- 
dous new sports and recreational park in 
Ciudad Trujillo, which is to include virtu- 
ally every traditional facility for both 
participation and spectator sports were 
modified in terms of Maryland's recom- 
mendations. 

(Continued on page 6j) 

McCall Award 

Anne Holland, director of the University 
of Maryland programs on WBAL-TV Bal- 
timore, has been named the top winner of 
McCall Magazine's second annual public 
service awards for American women in 
radio and television. 

Mrs. Holland was chosen for her "out- 
standing contributions" in three categories: 
Programs of general interest to the com- 
munity, programs of interest primarily to 
women and programs of interest primarily 
to youth. 

She was honored at a banquet in Balti- 
more at which time the official presenta- 
tion of the "Mike" award took place. 

More than 150 of Maryland's most dis- 
tinguished citizens gathered in the Shera- 
ton Belvedere for the occasion of this 
"Woman of the Year" award. 

In receiving the "Mike" award, Mrs. 
Holland was chosen for her "outstanding 
contributions" in three categories; pro- 
grams of general interest to the commu- 
nity, programs of interest primarily to 
women and programs of interest pri- 
marily to youth. 

Specifically mentioned in the January 
issue of McCall's, which announced the 
winners, was the University of Maryland 
medical program, "Live and Help Live." 
The magazine stated: 

"The unique medical program Mrs. Hol- 
land now conducts over WBAL-TV is just 
another way of carrying out this desire 
to help others. Her program "Live and 
Help Live" conducted with a panel of 
distinguished Baltimore physicians, gives 
advice about preventing and treating dis- 
ease and helps the public make the fullest 
use of medical facilities." 

Senator John Marshall Butler acted as 
toastmaster. The principal address was 
delivered by Dr. H. C. Byrd, who stressed 
the importance of television as an inte- 
gral part of mid-twentieth-century life and 
spoke warmly of Mrs. Holland's unstint- 
ing devotion to the cause of helping others. 

"The service rendered the citizens of 
Maryland", Mrs. Holland wrote in a letter 
to Dr. Howard M. Bubert, Chairman of 
the Medical School's Post Graduate Com- 
mittee, "by the professional staff at the 
University of Maryland has been out- 
standing and made history. The hours so 
generously given in the preparation of 
weekly broadcasts by these men and 
women run into a great number. There 
is not a week following a broadcast that 
letters and telephone calls are not received 
commenting on the highly professional and 
interesting manner in which this infor- 
mation is offered. Working with these 




UAt*U[j 



laruland Women kt 



HOWARD AT SARATOGA 



there's no suit like a Schleisner Suit for Spring! 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 

Phone MUlberry 6070 Baltimore 2, Maryland 



If you cannot sell fluid milk, 
separate it and sell your cream 
to us. We will buy it year 'round. 
Write for particulars. 

Chesapeake Creameries 

INCORPORATED 

Baltimore 23, Md. 
OR CALL EDmondson 5300 



men and women has been one of the most 
wonderful experiences I have ever known. 
I have come to know the professional 
man and woman as a person, a top-flight 
citizen interested in the welfare of the 
community. They are to a great degree 
responsible for winning the McCall Award. 
I take this opportunity to thank these 
fine people through you, not only for what 
they have done for others, but for what 
they have done for me. May we aim to 
carry on 'ad astra'." 

Mrs. Hottel, President 

Mrs. William H. Hottel is the new presi- 
dent of the Board of Lady Managers of 
Episcopal Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 
Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. Hottel had been first vice president 
for two years. 

She is a member of St. Andrew's Church, 
College Park and has been a Gray Lady 
at Episcopal since 1941 as well as house 
committee chairman. Mrs. Hottel, wife of 
"Bill" Hottel of the Department of Jour- 
nalism, is past president of the Women's 
Guild at St. Andrew's. 



Chapel Bible 



Col. Geary Eppley, director of student 
welfare and dean of men has presented, 
for use in the chapel, on behalf of his three 
sisters, and himself, in memory of their 
parents, Geary B. and Eva M. Eppley, a 
large, red-leather King James's Version of 
the Bible. 

The Board of Regents accepted the 
Bible on behalf of the University. 



THE 
TOWN HOUSE 

ONE OF THE 

UNIQUE EATING 

PLACES IN THE 

COUNTRY- 
FAMOUS FOR 
FOOD IN THE 
MARYLAND 
TRADITION 

Howard & 22nd Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
HOpkins5191 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT ST. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Since 7866 

Essex 287 Baltimore, Md. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 
Phone VErnon 8400 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



.9] 



LIVE AND HELP LIVE 

A University of Maryland Venture 

By John C. Krantz, Jr. 
Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicim . University of Mart/land 

From "Current Medical Digest" 




Left to right: — Dr. John C. Krantz, Anne Holland, D. L. Provost, Vice President, Hearst Corporation, Station WBAL-TV, Baltimore. 



It has been a little over a year now since 
we somewhat hesitatingly decided to 
bring the work of the professional schools 
of the University of Maryland and its 
hospital to the attention of the people 
by way of television. This decision re- 
sulted in a series of authoritative yet un- 
derstandable programs, "Live and Help 
Live" telecast by WBAL-TV. The pro- 
grams are dedicated to promoting in our 
community better health through an un- 
derstanding of the work of medical science 
— its progress and problems. That we have 
been successful in doing this is attested 
to by the fact that the series has brought 
about what experts consider a phenomenon 
in the viewing habits of the television 
audience. 

Highly Rated 

"Live and Help Live" is today the high- 
est rated, non-sponsored, public service 
telecast in this area. To state it more 
concretely, in the Baltimore metropolitan 
area every Tuesday night approximately 
100.000 persons in front of 25,600 television 
sets watch and listen to specialists in 
various fields explain and illustrate the 
workings of medical science. This occurs 
in spite of such stalwart drawing cards as 
wrestling matches and major league base- 
ball games telecast at the same time over 
other networks. 

The idea for the program scries did not 
start with the members of the University 
staff, but rather with a laywoman, widely 
experienced in public service affairs, Anne 
Holland, of Station WBAL-TV. Approach- 
ing me on the subject, she pointed out the 
many possibilities, and I in turn discussed 
it with other members of the School. Our 
lack of know-how and many misgivings 
at the prospect of tying in medicine with 
the show business were the biggest ob- 
stacles, in spite of Anne Holland's reas- 
surance that any subject offered with 
dignity would prove acceptable to the 
profession, the University , and the general 



public. Finally, with the aid of certain 
faculty members of the Medical, Dental. 
Pharmacy, Nursing, and Law Schools and 
the administrative staff of University 
Hospital — "the show went on.'' 

The first program was planned and pro- 
duced under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Psychiatry. . . . 

Narrator: 

The members of this department are 
going to present to you one of the major 
problems that confronts psychiatrists.... 
It deals with the way our behaviour af- 
fects our relationships with people — and in 
turn our welfare — how we get along with 
our families, our friends, and in our jobs. 
The Department of Psychiatry is con- 
cerned with t he study and treatment of 
patients — and the teaching of what is 
known about these matters to doctors.... 
(CUT TO DOCTORS OFFICE) 

Scene I, Staff 

(FADE IN ON CONFERENCE. DR. FINE- 
SINGER OPENS, SPEAKING DIRECTLY TO 
AUDIENCE.) 

. . .Given this half hour in which to tell 
you something about our work, we decided 
that the most effective way would be to 
show you what goes on when a psychia- 
trist is actually interviewing a patient. 

You will see two interviews with the 
same patient and you will see the doctor 
discuss with the rest of us here the mean- 
ing of these interviews. 

This is a patient who came to the doctor 
because of recurring headaches. As you 
listen to the interview, you may find your- 
self wondering why the doctor is interested 
not only in her headache, but also in the 
tilings in her home circle, what is done and 
said and felt among them. This is what 
the psychiatrist means when lie talks about 
behavior. 

There is good reason why the doctor 
is interested in the patient's behavior.... 
(CAMERA FOCUSES ON MRS. HARPER. EN- 
TERING DOCTOR'S OFFICE.) 



Dr.: Mrs. Harper? Won't you come in? 
Won't you sit down'.' 

(BUSINESS: MRS. HARPER, STARTS FOR 
DESK, PAUSES, STOPS TO TOUCH AND 
STRAIGHTEN PICTURE.) 

Mrs. H.: You don't mind if I straighten 
this? 

Dr.: No, not at all. Won't you sit down, 
please? 

(BUSINESS: SELECTS STRAIGHT CHAIR 
OPPOSITE DOCTOR.) 

Dr.: Well, Mrs. Harper, ivhat's been the 
I rouble? 

Mrs.H.: It's these headaches, doctor. 
They've gotten a lot worse lately.... 

Soon after that first try, the audience 
rating was substantial. Six months later 
it sky-rocketed. In the meantime the 
volume of fan mail and telephone calls 
voicing approval and encouragement grew 
greater than the most hopeful proponents 
of the experiment had predicted. The 
following few excerpts are typical of the 
letters from listeners: 

Commendation 

"It was very gratifying to see your pro- 
gram.... You are to be commended on 
your decision to show this type of sub- 
ject . . . . " 

"...I would like to see more of tlie 
same. Hoping that this is a definite step 
in regular scheduling of this type of pro- 
gram . . . ." 

"We certainly did enjoy your program 

"...It ivas very interesting and we hope 
to see more programs like it as it let us 
know just rchat ivonderful work our doc- I 
tors arc doing. ..." 

".../ think this is one of the most 
interesting and instructive programs on 
the air, and congratidate you for present- 
ing to the community a program of real 
public service " 

"I have heard a lot of .. .comment on 
the program, and it has ahvays been 
favorable. ..." 

"...The best [program] I have seen on 



10' 



your station. A marvelous job was done 
in presenting valuable information to the 
layman in languagt In could understand!" 
"...I am looking forward to future pro- 
grams. Please help to keep them coming 

"...I commend you for helping to bring 
good, worthwhile programs to the tele- 
vision audience . . . *' 

It soon became apparent that a more 
formal administrative control must be es- 
tablished. Consequently, the television 
program was placed under the direction 
of the "Audio-Visual Committee," of the 
Post Graduate Committee of which the 
writer is the chairman. It is the function 
of the Audio-Visual Committee to de- 
termine program content. In turn, the 
committee works in conjunction with a 
technical staff, consisting of a producer, 
director, and artist, who visit the school, 
take the material indicated as valuable, 
and translate them into terms of TV pre- 
sentation. 

Timely Subjects 

Among the topics chosen for presenta- 
tion were several timely telecasts. In 
March of this year, at the peak of a ring- 
worm epidemic in Baltimore. Drs. H. M. 
Robinson, Jr. and Eugene S. Bereston, de- 
scribed on "Live and Help Live" the 
methods of detecting ringworm by the use 
of ultra-violet light. 



The following day Baltimore City clinics 
reported their offices "flooded" with per- 
sons desiring treatment for the disease. 

On another occasion, officials of the 
dental school discussed the problem of 
dental caries and the fluoridation of water, 
at that time a vital lull touchy topic in 
Baltimore. The telecast prompted many 
refreshing letters from listeners. 

One of the most popular programs of 
the series, so far, was the demonstration 
by members of the School of Pharmacy 
of the standardization of digitalis on the 
embryonic heart of a chick. On a elose-up 
view by the TV cameras, the audience 
got an intriguing view of the chick's hear! 
beats. 

Intelligence Popular 

Let it be stated here that the committee 
and the television station have yet to shy 
away from any topic which through tele- 
vision presentation would better the health 
of the citizens of Maryland. 

(Si e also article on page 37) 

These shows have proven that intelli- 
gence can be popular. But further than 
this, the members of the professional 
schools of the university have the satis- 
faction of knowing that by assuming more 
duties and responsibilities in this service 
to the people of Maryland, they have also 
enhanced the significance of the university 
in the minds of the people of the state. 



ON WBAL-TV 

Scenes from "Live and Help Live" University of Maryland's Feature 



:;: * ; 3| 






Experts Agree . . . 



tssitay 

■■QUALITY-W 



BANDED FRANKFURTS 

Guaranteed pure and wholesome — 
selected beef and pork . . . sea- 
soned and spiced to tasty perfec- 
tion. Every Esskay Frankfurt is 
banded for your protection. Buy by 
the brand on the band. 

At Your Dealers 

Always say ESSKAY 

WM. SCHLUDERBEHG-T. J. KURDLE CO. 



The 



Maurice 
Leeser Co. 



( PRINTERS 
1 PUBLISHERS 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 



536 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 

SAratoga 4446-4447 

In Our Second Generation 
of Quality and Service 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 Pulaski Highway 
Baltimore, Md. 



THE mODiufl 

STflTioiey co. 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

PRINTING 

OFFICE FURNITURE 

17 S. Charles St. MU. 4377 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



A CRISFIELD INDUSTRY 




THE NEW BRIDDELL PLANT 




Charles D. Briddell Co. 

Opens New Plant with 

Dr. Harry C. Byrd Principal 

Speaker. 

By Jean L. Mowbray 

Confronted with the problem of guess- 
ing the "line" of the Charles D. Brid- 
dell Company, John Daly's TV panel, 
"WHAT'S MY LINE?" could hazard a 
variety of answers ranging from ice picks 
to lethal weapons, an utility line of kit- 
chen cutlery to luxurious Carvel Hall 
Steak Knives, or advertising novelties. 
It would be a direct 
hit with any of these 
commodities. 

In the 58 years 
since Charles D. Brid- 
dell, Sr. first repaired 
a pair of oyster tongs 
for $1.50, the Charles 
D. Briddell Company 
has manufactured ev- 
erything from equip- 
ment used in the sea- 
food industry, carts 
and buggies, to hand 
grenades and Ba- 
zookas (during "World War II) and its 
present day best seller — the nationally- 
known Carvel Hall cutlery line. 

Dr. Byrd Speaker 

The official opening of the new Briddell 
plant at Crisfield on Friday, January 30th 
at which Dr. H. C. Byrd, president of the 
University of Maryland, presided as the 
principal guest speaker, marked the cul- 
mination of a series of dramatic events 
(including two fires — one in 1906; the 
other in March, 1951) which led the Brid- 
dell Company to its present position of 
supremacy in the cutlery manufacturing 
field. 

Now headed by Charles D. Briddell, 
Jr., who in 1935 was president of his class 
at the University of Maryland, and a team 
composed of three other Briddell children, 
Thomas (vice president in charge of 
Sales) ; Willis (Treasurer and vice presi- 
dent in charge of Operations) ; and Ev- 
elyn (now Mrs. John Andrews, Director of 
Purchasing), the Briddell organization has 
realized many of the aims and dreams of 
its founder. 

The more than 200,000 brick, 30,000 cu- 



Mr. Briddell 



bic yards of concrete, miles of pipe and 
electrical conduits used in the construc- 
tion of the new plant contrast sharply 
with the small shop on his father's farm 
in which Charles Briddell, Sr. took on the 
repair job which launched today's suc- 
cessful enterprise employing a staff of 
over 300 and a sales force of 55. 

Courage and Faith 

Among the elements that contributed 
greatly towards this success were courage, 
an unwavering faith, hard work, and de- 
termination on the part of Charles D. 
Briddell, Sr. who was called upon to dis- 
play all these attributes in the years 
which followed his original venture. He 
faced his first test in 1906 when a double 
stroke of misfortune — the defection of a 
Virginia sales agency he had retained to 
handle sales of his carts and buggies on 
the Eastern shore of Virginia which went 
out of business and left Mr. Briddell in 
debt for several thousand dollars; and 
a fire destroyed his shop in Marion, Md. 

With painstaking effort, and working 
again from his father's farm, Charles 
Briddell slowly rebuilt his business until 
in 1914 he selected Crisfield, as the loca- 
tion for a new plant. His shop in Cris- 
field was part of a carriage and harness 
making establishment, operated by the 
late John W. Nock, a friend of young 
Briddell who was impressed with his abil- 
ity and determination. 

"When we came to Crisfield," said 
Ernest A. Ford, Mr. Briddell's foreman, 
"Mr. Bob Hall (local drayer) brought in 
one piece of equipment — our heavy press 
and our anvil — as a swinging load under 
the high wheels of his timber cart. The 
few other things we had were brought in 
a farm wagon." 

Near the Water 

Six years later, in 1920. a modern brick 
manufacturing plant was built in the lower 
section of Crisfield. near the waterfront. 
By this time Mr. A. Reese Betts (now 
Vice President of Engineering) had 
joined the factory staff and there were 
about forty employees who turned out 
oyster and clam knives, oyster and clam 
tongs, crab picking knives, bows for crab 
nets, tongs for handling live hard crabs, 
and other items used in the seafood indus- 
try. 

Sales expanded up and down the At- 
lantic seaboard, but the business was more 
or less seasonable due to the lack of de- 



mand for Briddell products during the 
seafood industry's off season. The addi- 
tion of a new line — manufacturing ice 
tongs and other ice handling tools — 
overcame this difficulty and put the com- 
pany on a solid, year 'round production 
schedule. 

In 1925 the business was incorporated 
with Charles D. Briddell, Sr. as president, 
Charles W. Sterling as secretary and A. 
Wellington Tawes as treasurer. By 1928, 
when the ice handling portion of the busi- 
ness was sold, the three older Briddell 
children, Evelyn, Charles, Jr., and Tom 
had become associated with the organiza- 
tion. 

Father's Secretary 

Evelyn became her father's secretary. 
Charles worked after school and Satur- 
days at an anvil or forge, or in some other 
production job, and later majored in me- 
chanical engineering at the University of 
Maryland in preparation for his present 
position as head of the firm. Tom, after 
a brief apprenticeship in the shop, showed 
more ability and inclination lor the sales 
end of the business and studied business 
administration, sales and finance during 
his college years. Willis, too, followed 
much the same pattern in preparing for 
his post as vice president and treasurer. 
Only two of the children have not allied 
themselves with the Briddell industry — 
Ruth Grace (now Mrs. Alfred Lawsou) 
who assists her husband in the manage- 
ment of Lawson's modern "One-Stop Tood 
Market"; and Mary Phyllis who is living 
in Annapolis where her husband, Lt. John 
Hayden, U.S.N .R.—M.C, is stationed. 

Many improvements had been made in 
the plant and business was flourishing by 
1932 when distributors in all sections of 
the country were profitably handling Brid- 
dell products and carload orders were 
pouring in from such companies as Coca- 
Cola. 

Novelties Added 

Further expansion of the company's ac- 
tivities occurred about this time with the 
addition of advertising novelties, many of 
which were created by John Andrews 
(Evelyn's husband), to the ever-growing 
list of Briddell products. A graduate of 
the Maryland Institute of Art and Johns 
Hopkins University, John came to Cris- 
field and joined the company, working 
his way through a number of departments 
until his appointment as Director of En- 
gineering in 1945. Advertising novelties 
created by Briddell designers found a 
ready market with such companies as 
Pontiac Motors, Pittsburgh Plate Glass, 
Schenley Distillers, Dr. Pepper, Buick 
and Ford Motors. 

In fact, it was an advertising novelty 
which led to the introduction of Carvel 
Hall Cutlery in the Briddell line-up of 
products. Paul Culver, a young crafts- 
man employed as a tool and die designer 
in the Martin & Schwartz plant at Salis- 
bury, heard of Briddell's efforts during 
early 1945 to develop some good post- 
war products and designed what he thought 
would make an excellent letter opener. 
Today, that letter opener, without one 
change in line or design, is marketed all 
over the country as the Carvel Hall 
Steak Knife which in 1952 chalked up a 
sales record of over 4.300,000 knives. 



12 



Long before this however, the Briddell 
team, with Charles, Jr. and Tom now ac- 
tively directing sales and production. 
keenly felt the need for additional floor 
space and not long after the introduction 
of advertising novelties to their line, pur- 
chased a big brick building almost across 
the street which was used for finishing and 
assembling, offices, and for shipping and 
storage space. 

Quality Traps 

Rubber-jawed traps for catching musk- 
rats provided the next field of endeavor 
for the productive Briddells. Developed 
from an idea originating with "Uncle" 
John Maddox. the traps were instantly 
successful and did much to establish the 
Briddell name as synonymous with quality. 

Through the years Charles Briddell, 
Sr. had kept his shoulder hard to the grind- 
stone — working long and arduous hours — 
until finally after returning from a hard 
trip to Philadelphia late in August. 1938, 
he was heard to remark, "I'm pretty 
tired." He left his office for the last time 
early in the afternoon of August 31st, 
1938 to go home and rest. He did not re- 
turn. 

Today's new Briddell plant, built as a 
result of the second destroying fire in 
March, 1951. embodies all that he lived 
and hoped for. His sons and daughter 
carry on the traditions he established for 
quality, sincerity of effort, loyalty to 
friends and employees, devotion to duty. 

Dreams Come True 

He would be justifiably proud of the 
Carvel Hall line which has vaulted almost 
overnight to a position of prominence in 
the fiercely competitive cutlery industry 
on the wings of the trimly beautiful Carvel 
Hall Steak Knife, a revival which had led 
to a new trend and a host of imitators 
which appeared on the marketing scene 
since the introduction of Carvel Hall 
Steak Knives in 1947. 

Exquisitely executed, intelligently mar- 
keted, merchandised and advertised, the 
steak knife has given a new lease on life 
to the Briddell Company, which this year 
has set its sights on a $400,000,000 sales 
goal and the launching of still another 
new product on the market, "kitchen cut- 
lerv by Briddell." 




PI 



v ll • mm&A 



5tt 




"CARILLONIC BELLS" 

GRACE THE TOWER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CHAPEl 

This carillon installation gives the listening ear all the per- 
fectly balanced and accurately matched tones of the carillon 
bells of Flanders with a 61-note Flemish-type instrument, 
played manually. In addition, a 25-note English-type instru- 
ment, equipped with automatic controls, will be used to play 
college tunes at predetermined hours. 

In whatever program planned for their use the bells will lift 
the hearts of those who hear, adding spiritual tone to the 
campus. 

An exclusive product of 
SCHULMfRICH CARILLONS, INC., Carrillon Hill, SELLERSVILLE, PA. 



Mrs. Updegriffel : "But remember, young man, 
the last time I bought a can of this chicken pie 
there was precious little chicken in it!" 

Part Time Pete: "We also sell cottage cheese 
and so far no one has found a cottage in it!" 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

As a result of a letter from a soldier in 
Korea appealing for clothing for Korean 
war orphans. Pi Kappa Alpha instituted a 
campaign to secure needed garments for 
children ranging in age from two months 
to ten years. The Deans of Men and 
Women and all fraternities and sororities 
at the Free State institution are supporting 
the drive. 

The Korean letter, from Pi Kappa Alpha 
alumnus Lt. Harry P. Cherigos, said in 
part, "There are a lot of orphans here who 
are barely existing. The men and officers 
in the compound try to help several of the 
orphanages. There's a lot we are doing 
but not enough in the way of getting 
children's clothing — something that doesn't 
exist here!" 



DANZER 

METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE 1818 



The various fraternity and sorority 
houses and women's dormitories at the 
university are serving as collection points 
for the donations. 



[13] 




(Continued front page 2) 

of Baltimore." Avalon was the name of 
Lord Baltimore's grant in Newfoundland. 
The Reverse consists of an escutcheon or 
shield bearing the Calvert and Grassland 
arms quartered. Above this is an earl's 
coronet and a fvdl-faced helmet. The es- 
cutcheon is supported on one side by a 
farmer and on the other by a fisherman, 
symbolizing Lord Baltimore's two estates 
of Maryland and Avalon. The Calvert 
motto on the scroll is usually translated 
"manly deeds, womanly words." The Latin 
legend on the border is translated "with 
favor wilt thou compass us as with a 
shield." (Psalms v, 12). 

The State Bird 

The Baltimore Oriole is the official 
Maryland Bird. Although it was not so 
designated by the Maryland Legislature 
until 1947, special provisions had been 
made for its protection since 1S82. 

The State Flower 

The Black-eyed Susan is the flower em- 
blem of the State of Maryland. 

The State Tree 

Maryland has chosen for its tree the 
White Oak. The magnificent specimen 
shown here is known as the Wye Oak and 
i- located at Wye Mills on the Eastern 
Shore. It is now owned by the State. 



My Maryland. 




, Ht'Tj-lud, tdj Mb-rj-lbodl Hi* torch «t at tbj 

ij j'.i, Mb-ry-lbod, mj Mt-rtitiJ Mr Moiiw Suit, to 

" - h L*od mt Mt-rj-Lud: Thr primal nt^rorotii 




ura*;U door. St -ri -Ut ; D7 St rt-lood! A- vraprfci p* - trl • H ■ k fort Tb»* 
tb« 1 kotttl Mt-rj -Uod. mj Mb - rT-liiH! For U« nd dbbtt, fox ttbb b»d »b»] lYj 
ctt.tr r.n, a..n..-,],c; Mb - rj-lbbdl Bo- nttm-ber Cbr- roll'd ba-trod trubt, R» 




Dt*ktdiit?trt*tjoIDiJ. 



The State Song 

The Maryland State song. "Maryland, 
My Maryland," was written by a Mary- 
lander who was living in the Confederacy 
during the War between the States. The 
air is not original; the words reflect the 
bitter feeling following the passage through 
Baltimore of Union troops in 1861. 

History 

1608, June— Captain John Smith explores 
coast of Maryland. 1632. June 20— Charter 
of Maryland granted to second Lord Bal- 
timore. 1633, November 22— The Ark and 
the Dove sail for "the Capes of the Chesa- 
peake Bay." 1634, March 25— The Ark 
and the Dove arrive at St. Clements (Blak- 
istone) Island. 1649 — Toleration Act 
passed. 1694 — Seat of government removed 
from St. Mary's to Annapolis. 1696— King 



William's School founded at Annapolis. 
1729. July 30— Baltimore Town erected. 
1763 — Mason and Dixon begin survey of 
Maryland boundary. 1774, October 19 — 
Peggy Stewart, laden with 2.000 pounds of 
taxable tea, burned. 1775. July 26 — For- 
mation of "Association of Freemen." 1776. 
July 3 — Maryland declares her indepen- 
dence. 1776, November — First State Con- 
stitution adopted. 1782 — Washington Col- 
lege, Chestertown, chartered. 1783. Novem- 
ber 26 — Annapolis becomes temporary Na- 
tional Capital. 1783, December 23— Wash- 
ington resigns commission in old Senate 
Chamber. Annapolis. 1784 — St. John's Col- 
lege, Annapolis, chartered. 1788, April 28 — 
State Convention at Annapolis ratifies 
Constitution of the United States. 1791, 
March 30 — Maryland cedes District of 
Columbia to the United States. 1812— 
University of Maryland chartered. 1814, 
September 12 — British repulsed at the Bat- 
tle of North Point. 1814, September 13— 
Bombardment of Fort McHenry; Francis 
Scott Key writes "The Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner." 1828. July 4 — Formal beginning of 
work on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 
1829. October 17— Chesapeake and Dela- 
ware Canal opened. 1844 — First telegraph 
line in the world built between Baltimore 
and Washington. 1845, October 10 — United 
States Naval Acadamy opened at An- 
napolis. 1861, April 23— "Maryland. My 
Maryland" written by James Ryder Ran- 
dall." 1862, September 17— Battle of An- 
tictam (Sharpsburg). 1864. July 9— Bat- 
tle of Monocacy. 1876, October— Johns 
Hopkins University opened. 1889, May 7 
— Johns Hopkins Hospital opened. 

Sports Critics 

The various attacks upon athletes and 
athletics, appearing in newspapers and 
other publications with nauseating regu- 
larity, leave a lot of fellows magnificently 
unconvinced. 

Not long ago we heard a well known 
TV sports "authority" discussing the need 
for de-emphasis of football because, after 
all, the "education of youth is the thing 
with football only incidental thereto". 
Long before the speaker was waving a 
rattle instead of a mike, this primer class 
deduction had been written off as A B C's 
by just about every college president in 
the country. Yet here we find a fellow 
advising the great American public that 
the value of educating student bodies of 
astronomical figures is more important 
than the accomplishments of college foot- 
ball players who, percentage-wise in com- 
parison with entire student bodies, pre- 
sent a figure so numerically small as to be 
almost nil. 

Good educators, like good military-naval 
leaders, have always assessed sports by 
their objective values — a means to an end, 
a part of a general program of education of 
mind and body. ("Mens sana in corpore 
sano"). 

The general misunderstanding of ob- 
jective values of sports is probably best 
illustrated these days by the continued 
attacks upon boxing. 

The derogatory statements made against 
this sport reflect clearly not only abysmal 
ignorance of the subject but definite evi- 
dence of wanting neither to understand, 
learn nor listen. 



Simple statements to the effect that the 
objective value of boxing includes instill- 
ing combat-mindedness into the viewing 
public and that it is rated as the ideal 
basis for hand to hand training and bay- 
onet combat are met with stares reflecting 
disbelief or total blanks. 

An equally simple statement to the effect 
that it takes the same sort of commenda- 
ble physical courage to go into battle as 
to enter a boxing ring draws even less 
agreement. 

However, you can't beat the records. 
You can't laugh off Congressional Medals 
of Honor and other high decorations. Is 
it something that just "happens" when 
self-sacrificing deeds, above and beyond 
the line of duty, are performed by boxers 
and ex-boxers? If so, it also just "hap- 
pens" that the decorations to these lads 
show their numbers to be considerably out 
of proportion, percentage-wise, to the over- 
all number of decorated fighting men. 

Here are a few examples from Korea : — 

Army Medical Corporal Levi Jackson 
gave his life to save wounded comrades. 
He saved them by using his body as a 
shield against machine gun fire. Distin- 
guished Service Cross to his family in the 
little town of Cayce, S. C, where they'll 
tell you, "Levi learned how to do things 
light when he took up boxing". It so 
happens he was heavyweight champion of 
the Army. He learned how to fight. Some- 
how it also taught him to die like a gen- 
tleman. 

The Silver Star to Master Sergeant 
Howard Williams. Intelligent and inspired 
leadership and cold, raw courage, says the 
citation, exposed him to enemy fire while 
he covered a retreat to safety of a whole 
platoon of his fellow soldiers. Like Jack- 
son, Howard had also been heavyweight 
champion of the Army. 

"They may beat me or outclass me but 
for all of my life I've learned the lesson 
that, no matter what the assignment, no 
one will ever see me QUIT!" The speaker 
was Lou Brown, member of Maryland's 
1947 varsity boxing team. Bronze Star 
Medal for Lou for, with a unit of 55 men, 
taking a position held by 400 enemy 
troops. He knew more than they did but, 
also, he had the well known guts to go in 
there against odds. 

Combat trained Marines are taught to 
"know your weapons". Thus they KNOW 
what a live grenade will do. It is diffi- 
cult to visualize a deed of greater sacrifice 
than that of hurling oneself upon a five 
hand grenade, suffering certain death in 
order that comrades might come to no 
harm. A trained combat Marine would 
know if there is time enough to pick it 
up and throw it. 

Edward Gomez. 19 year old kid from 
Omaha, won the Congressional Medal of 
Honor for smothering a grenade in order 
to save his buddies. Announcement of the 
posthumous award and citation concludes 
with, "Gomez was a well known Omaha 
Golden Gloves boxer ". 

Twenty year old Marine Corporal Jack 
Davenport, occupied a defensive position 
with his Sergeant. Walter L. Barfoot. Just 
two men in a fox hole. No one there to 
check up on their courage. 

That is — and this is important — no one 
but themselves. 



14 



An enemy grenade landed near Ser- 
geant Barfoot. Corporal Davenport hurled 
himself upon it, smothering it. Posthu- 
mously the Modal of Honor to Corporal 
Davenport, announcement of the citation 
concluding with, "In Kansas City he was 
a well known Golden Gloves boxer". 

The trouble with an editorial like this 
is the people who need no convincing will 
be convinced while the "thumbs down on 
athletes" fellows will write it off as just 
so much coincidence. 

Infantry leaders know better. They 
know that courage is courage ami that il 
is best taught in rather rugged schools of 
learning. 

Maryland Overseas 

The University of Maryland is contrib- 
uting in many ways toward good inter- 
national relations and understanding. 

Maryland conducts in North Africa, 
Turkey, Europe, and the British Isles, 
eighty-three educational centers in coop- 
eration with the Armed Forces and civilian 
personnel in which were registered last 
year a total of 10,000 students. (The 
University's President . Dr. H. C. Byrd, re- 
cently returned from an inspection tour of 
these facilities.) 

The University has given leaves of ab- 
sence to members of its staff to carry on 
work for the United States Government in 
foreign countries. One is now in India and 
one is in Persia. 

Maryland conducts, in cooperation with 
the Pan American Union, a special insti- 
tute for vocational education teachers of 
the Latin American countries, as well as a 
similar symposium of representatives of 
the field of magnetism from all over the 
world. 

The University recently concluded an in- 
stitute for teachers from Ecuador, Bolivia 
and Peru for study of methods of integrat- 
ing the culture of North and South Amer- 
ica. 

Recently, after six years of study, Mary- 
land completed and published an Atlas on 
the Mineral Resources of the world. It is 
now bringing to a conclusion Atlases on 
the Resources of China and on World Re- 
sources generally and will shortly publish 
both. 

The Dean of the Engineering College 
toured Central, South America, and the 
West Indies, studying the organization and 
effectiveness of the engineering colleges of 
the countries in these three sections of the 
world. 

The Dean of the College of Agriculture 
participated in agricultural events in Ecua- 
dor, in an effort to help improve agricul- 
tural and general cultural relations with 
that country. 

The Dean of the College of Physical 
Education twice visited the Dominican Re- 
public in the interests of a Physical Edu- 
cation program in that country. 

Maryland is accepting students from 
India and the Near East, China and Egypt, 
in graduate fields in highly specialized lines 
of work. It is understood that one of those 
in charge of food production and allocation 
in India is a man who completed his 
graduate work here a year or so ago. 

The University is discussing with several 
countries the possibility of an exchange of 
teachers. 



an original 

iMv OIL PAINTING 
l/KlW TO MAKE ONE 

■ y^^THiOl MARK ^^^ IEC. Ul *. 




THE PICTURE CRAFT COMPLETE ART KIT IS 
THE PERFECT ANSWER TO THE GIFT PROBLEM 




per set 

Choose from 26 Beautiful 
Artist-Designed Subjects 
Kit includes 

• Numbered Artist's Canvas (16 x 12) 

• Pre-mixed Oil Colors 

• Special Artist's Brush 

• Complete Painting Instructions 
Picture Craft is sold at stationery, 
hobby, art, handicraft and depart- 
ment stores . . or write direct fo. 



Men and women of all ages, even chil- 
dren are painting beautiful, original 
oil paintings with Picture Craft's 
complete art kit. 

RESULTS GUARANTEED 
Numbered canvas guides your hand. 
Pre-mixed artists' colors are keyed 
to canvas. No mixing of colors — no 
mess. You will be amazed at your 
new found painting ability. 

Give original oils that you have 
painted or . . . give Picture Craft 
Kits so that your friends may have 
the pleasure of painting original oil 
paintings the easy Picture Craft way. 



PAINT A BCAUTIf UL PICIURE IN OILS 




«0 EXPERIENCE • NO EESSONS -NO MIXING 



ZB.E. 25TH 5T., BALTD. IS, MD. 



SINCE 




1890 



Fidelity and Deposit 
company of maryland 

Home Office: Baltimore. *///. 



FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 

Burglary, Robbery, Forgery & Glass Insurance 



15 



UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 

ALUMNI CLUBS 



Richmond Club 

Alumni of the Richmond area, some 25 
strong, met for supper at the Wil- 
liamsburg Hotel on January 8. In the 
words of President Paul Mullinix, '36, "We 
finished in good time for the Richmond- 
Maryland Basketball game where we were 
joined by several more alumni in a group 
of reserved seats and I think out-yelled 
the rest of the sell-out crowd. It was a 
honey of a game. Maryland three points 
behind with twelve seconds to go and yet 
winning 63 to 60." 

The next anticipated function is an 
oyster roast at the home of Taylor Rowe 
in the early Spring. 

Club President Mullinix has been com- 
missioned a Kentucky Colonel by the 
Governor Lawrence W. Wetherly of the 
Blue Glass State. 

Mullinix is Director of Management 
Service for the Southern States Coopera- 
tive with headquarters in Richmond. He 
has held the position of Store Manager, 
District Manager of Private Agencies, 
District Manager of Service Stores, As- 
sistant Director of Distribution and Direc- 
tor of Feed Distribution. He now has 
responsibility of supervising the operations 
at 121 local cooperatives having a volume 
of over $35,000,000. Paul is a member of 
the Board of Directors of the Agricultural 
Alumni Association and is Superintendent 
of a sunday school with an enrollment of 
almost 600. He married Home Ec. grad- 
uate, Carolyn Young, and has three daugh- 
ters. 

Meeting at Wellsboro 

From Bob Grogan, '49 BPA, a well 
traveled former vice-president of the New 
York Alumni Club, comes word of a 
strange meeting in Wellsboro, Penna. Bob 
stopped in a drug store to get supplies 
and the Pharmacist noticed the Theta 
Chi on his graduation ring. When he 
found Bob was from Maryland, he called 
his wife and she in turn explained that 
her mother is now the house mother at 
the Kappa Kappa Gamma house. Bob 
is now located in Warren, Penna. 

Baltimore Jamboree 
By Beatrice Y. Janett 

The Alumni Club of Baltimore enter- 
tained 300 members and guests in the 
Auditorium of the new Psychiatric Build- 
ing of the University Hospital at a "Janu- 
ary Jamboree" in which recent graduates 
were feted in an evening of "Fun-Food- 
and-Frolic." 

Master of Ceremonies Austin Diggs ar- 
ranged an interesting program which in- 
cluded : 

Georgia Reed, soloist, accompanied by 
Mildred Wilson ; a Charleston Group com- 
posed of Maxine Haines, Marie Hinds, 
Jean Elmore, Nancy Jo Kolhoss, Nestor 
Hine, Jo Harbert; George Weisensel, Ma- 
gician; Charles A. Carson, soloist, John 



Schnider, accompanist; Dr. William A. 
Gray, impersonations; University Quartet, 
Student nurses Mildred Wilson, Marie 
Hinds, Nestor Hine, Jo Harbert, and Dr. 
Joseph P. Cappuccio in "Jolson" songs. 

General Chairman Dr. Arthur I. Bell, 
was assisted by Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. 
Entertainment; James 0. Proctor, Reser- 
vations; Mrs. Thomas C. Webster, Ar- 
rangements; Mrs. Ruth Ohlendorf, Decor- 
ations; Beatrice Jarrett and Sally Ogden, 
Publicity and Promotion. 

To Present "Hasty Heart" 

"Hasty Heart," an intimate comedy 
staged by the Dramatic Group of the Uni- 
versity, will be presented on Friday, March 
20, in the Auditorium of the new North- 
wood Elementary School — Loch Raven 
Boulevard and Hartsdale Road, Baltimore 
— under the sponsorship of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Alumni Club of Balti- 
more. The audience is limited to 300 and 
first invitations for reservations will go to 
members of the organization. 

During the past two years the group 
has sponsored Spring Concerts featuring 
the Glee Club, under the direction of 
Harlan Randall, and the University Band 
under the direction of Robert Landers. 
This year's entertainment is being planned 
under the able guidance of Dr. Charles 
Sylvester, President of the Baltimore Club, 
who announced that proceeds from this 
affair will be added to the Luncheon Fund 
for under-privileged children in the Bal- 
timore Citv Schools. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



In Tokyo 

Army Nurse First Lt. Margery E. Aird, 
who attended S&CS '52, has joined 
the staff of the Tokyo Army Hospital. 
largest hospital of its type in the Far 
East, a key installation in the treatment 
of UN soldiers wounded in Korea. 

Lieutenant Aird received her commis- 
sion in June 1951 and was called to active 
duty in August of that year. She had 
been stationed at Fort Meade, Md. 

In Japan 

Pvt. Harold D. White, who attended 
CSCS '50- '52, has graduated from the Far 
East Command Chemical School at Camp 
Gifu, Japan. 

The two-week course included instruc- 
tion in the defenses against chemical, 
bacteriological and radiological warfare. 

White entered the Army in March 1952. 

He is a member of the Lambda Chi 
Alpha Fraternity. 

In Honor Guard 

Major Robert D. Glaser, who attended 
S. & C.S. in '52, was a member of the honor 
guard which escorted President Eisenhower 
to the White House on inauguration day. 

He wears the Silver Star with Oak Leaf 
Cluster, Bronze Star with three Clusters, 
Purple Heart with Cluster, Combat Infan- 
tryman Badge with Star, French Croix de 
Guerre with Star and the Presidental Unit 
Emblem. He is a veteran of Korea. 



With Lockheed 

Terrence May, Jr., who attended S&CS, 
51-52, former administrative contracting 
officer for the Korean air lift and Chief of 
Contracts Branch of Headquarters Mili- 
tary Air Transfer Service, has been named 
administrative assistant to J. W. Clutter, 
General Sales Manager, Lockheed Air- 
craft Service, Inc., Burbank, California. 

Mr. May has an extensive background 
of military service. He was a pilot in the 
China-Burma-India theater and was deco- 
rated with the Distinguished Flying Cross. 
More recently, he has been resident con- 
tract supervisor at Keflanik Airport, Ice- 
land, and a member of the Joint United 
States-Icelandic Airport Committee. 



College of 



Military Science 



June Weather Class 

Mid-term college graduates who com- 
pleted degree requirements in Janu- 
ary may apply for immediate direct com- 
missions in the United States Air Force 
Reserve and assignment to basic meteorol- 
ogy graduate training in June, according 
to an announcement made today by Ma- 
jor General W. O. Senter, Commanding 
General of the USAF Air Weather Serv- 
ice. 

Qualified graduates, who must have re- 
ceived credit for one year of college 
physics and mathematics through inte- 
gral calculus, will receive complete appli- 
cation forms by writing to the Command- 
ing General, Air Weather Service, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C. College seniors, both 
men and women, who will graduate in 
June with required physics and mathe- 
matics credits may also apply at this time 
for commissions to be awarded following 
graduation. June graduates will enter 
graduate meteorology school in Septem- 
ber. 

June Class 

The June class, which will be of limited 
size, was established specifically to pro- 
vide an early entrance into weather school 
for mid-term 1953 graduates. Since sev- 
eral weeks is required to process the ap- 
plication forms and obtain approval from 
the participating university, qualified grad- 
uates are being urged to submit applica- 
tion forms as soon as possible. Mid-term 
graduates who fail to submit their appli- 
cations in time for the June class by 
March 1st will be considered for the Sep- 
tember classes. 

Participating colleges and universities 
offering the government-paid basic mete- 
orology courses include the following na- 
tionally prominent schools: Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, New York 
University, University of Chicago, Penn- 
sylvania State College, University of Cal- 
ifornia at Los Angeles, Florida State Uni- 
versity, University of Washington and St. 
Louis University. Only one of these 
schools will offer the special June class. 

The new opportunities offered young 
men and women by the USAF Air 
Weather Service assume greater impor- 
tance today as new horizons are being 
opened to people trained and experienced 
in the field of meteorology. 



16 




Wins Bronxe Stor 

.Mai. Adam J. Eisen- 
hauer (Mil. Sci. '50) 
has been awarded the 
Bronze Star Medal for 
meritorious service as 

execlll ive officer of the 

Intelligence Section's 
Research and Analysis 
Branch, Sth Army, in 
Korea. 

Maj. Eisenhauer 
came to Maryland 
Major Eisenhauer from Hofstra College. 

In Alaska 
Capt. William H. Chapin, who attended 
Military Science. '49- '50. is serving at Fort 
Richardson, Alaska, part of the security 
force along the northern frontier. 

Korean Command 

Lt. Col. Emil D. Sasse, (Mil. Sci. '52) has 
been named commander of the 4th Ord- 
nance Battalion in Korea. 

Colonel Sasse first entered the Army in 
September 1940 and won a battlefield com- 
mission at Kasserine Pass, North Africa, 
during World War II. 

His decorations include the Soldier's 
Medal, the Bronze Star Medal for valor 
with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Com- 
mendation Ribbon and the Purple Heart. 

In Japan 

Lt. Col. Harry M. Smith, (Mil. Sc. '51) 
is Director of Instruction, Eta Jima Spe- 
cialist School in Japan. 

Colonel Smith wears the American De- 
fense Medal, the French Medalle de Ver- 
dune. the World War II Victory Medal, 
the Army of Occupation Medal for Ger- 
many and the UN and Korean Service 
Ribbons. 



Graduate School 



Overseas Students 

China, with 13 students, leads in the list 
of foreign countries represented in 
the University of Maryland's Graduate 
School. Of the 2.000 graduate students en- 
rolled 67 are from 22 overseas countries. 

Second in the num- 
ber of students is 
Egypt with 11, fol- 
lowed by Germany 
with 7, Iraq with 6, 
Iran with 5, India with 
4, and the Philippines 
with 3. 

Pakistan, Puerto 
Rico, Thailand and 
Turkey have 2 each, 
while Brazil, Burma, 
Cuba. Estonia, Greece, 
Italy. Korea. Lebanon, 
Peru and Venezuela 
are each represented by one student. 

Of the graduate students at College Park, 
the Department of Education has the 
largest number, 255 men and 202 women. 
The Physics Department is next with 259 
men and 4 women. Pharmaceutical Chem- 
istry and Pharmacy each have one gradu- 
ate student. 




Dean Bamford 



"This year there are 57 candidates for 
PhD's. six for EdD's, 21 for MA's, 49 for 
MEd's, and 13 for MS degrees," said Dr. 
Ronald Bamford. Dean of the Graduate 
School, adding, "Within the last year, 67 
doctor's degrees and 340 master's degrees 
were iii\ en. 

"Applications for admission to graduate 
school in September, 1953. have already 
been received from all 48 states," Dr. 
Bamford slated. 

With Hughes Aircraft 

Stanley Filer ((Jrad. '44) has transferred 
from the Reeves Instrument Corporation 
to the Hughes Aircraft Research and De- 
velopment Laboratories. Culver City, Cali- 
fornia, where he is serving as a mathemati- 
cian in the radar laboratory. He received 
the Ph.D. in mathematics from New York 
University in 1950. 

Heads AGA 

Dr. Ronald Bamford. Dean of the Uni- 
versity's Graduate School, has been elected 
president of the American Genetics Asso- 
ciation. He succeeds Dr. Marcus Rhoades 
of the University of Illinois. 

The Maryland Dean was named head of 
the group for a three year term at the 
Association's executive council's recent 
meeting in Washington, D. C. Last year. 
Dr. Bamford served as vice president of 
the Association. 

DuPont Fellowship 

The University of Maryland, for the 
second straight year, has been named re- 
cipient of a postgraduate fellowship in 
chemistry granted by the DuPont Com- 
pany. 

The award is for the 1953-1954 academic 
year and is the same as that made to 
Maryland for the current year. It provides 
SI. 500 for an unmarried man or $2,100 for 
a married man, $1,200 for the University to 
support his work, and payment of tuition 
and fees. 

DuPont has authorized a fund of about 
$600,000 to carry on its full program of aid 
to education in universities and colleges 
across the country. 

The grant provides support for pre-doc- 
toral training of students and is intended to 
help maintain the flow of technically 
trained men and women into teaching and 
research work at universities, and into 
technical positions in industry and govern- 
ment. The University selects the person 
who will receive the fellowship and the 
research work to be undertaken. 





Baltimore 
Business Forms 

SAVE "p *o 

/. 3 °' y° ur 

TIME 




"Let me tell you, young man, that when I 
attended this University the people on campus 
were a whole lot different from those of this day 
and age !" 

"Yeh, Miss Nasenblasen, but those Anacostia 
Indians don't come up Paint Branch in canoes 
any more." 



BALTIMORE Business Forms save you 
lime, save you money. Yes, their stream- 
lined designs help speed forms writing. 
Your workers save as much as two 
hours out of every six hours required for 
writing with ordinary business forms. 

Whether you want a salesbook that 
keeps your sales clerks selling instead 
of writing — or whether you want a mul- 
tiple copy form which combines in- 
voices with bills of lading, address 
labels, and accounting copies for one 
easy writing — it will pay you to make 
your next order for business forms an 
order for BALTIMORE Business Forms. 
Then you will make your records by the 
fastest, most efficient, and most eco- 
nomical methods known to the business 
world. 

Write or phone today for samples of 
business forms by BALTIMORE. 

The B altimore Salesbook Companu 



3120-56 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 29, Maryland 

GILMOR 8000 

TALBOT T. SPEER (Class of 1917), 

President and General Manager 



[17] 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

WHERE YOU SAVE UP TO 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Ouf 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 
1016 Bladensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears Roebuck) 



Sheet Metal 



Skylights 



Jsrvin / richett 

GENERAL ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

Phone Union 4-2321 



1504 48th PLACE, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 27, D.C. 



"EVERYTHING IN MILLWQRK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 
For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PlYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 New York Avenue, N.E. ME 8-4126 
Washington 2, D.C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof - Colorfast 

Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



College of- 



Arts and Sciences 

- Lois Eld Ernest 'j8 




New Brigadier 

Congratulations are in order for Joseph 
D. C. Caldara, A&S, '31, who has 
been promoted from Colonel to Brigadier 
Genera] at Forbes Air Force Base. Topeka, 
Kan. He commands 
the 55th Strategic Re- 
connaissance Wing. 

A flying officer since 
1932. General Caldara 
was formerly with the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff 
assigned to the Emer- 
gency War Plans 
Team composed of 
representatives of the 
Army, Navy and Air 
Force. 

Gen. Caldara After his graduation 

from Maryland. Gen- 
eral Caldara accepted an Army Commis- 
sion and served in the Infantry for one 
year before transferring to the Air Corps. 
He was a member of the first graduating 
class from Randolph Field, Texas. After 
two years as a pilot. General Caldara was 
placed on reserve status and was employed 
as a sales supervisor for the B. F. Goodrich 
Co. 

He returned as a flying officer in 1940 
and has seen continous service since. Dur- 
ing World War II he was pilot and com- 
mander of B-17 and B-24 squadrons in the 
South Pacific for 18 months with 30 com- 
bat missions to his credit. He wears the 
Legion of Merit and Air Medal with one 
Oak Leaf Cluster. He is from Mt. Savage, 
Md. 

Discuss Europe - America 

Faculty of the College of Arts & Sciences 
participated recently in the "American 
Studies Association Open Conference". 
Subject of the session was, "Europe's View 
of America Today". Actively participat- 
ing were Dr. Carl Bode, Professor of 
English and President of the Association; 
Dr. Charles Manning, Chairman of the 
Conference, Associate Dean of the Col- 
lege; and Warren B. Bezanson of the 
English Department. 

History Department 

Dr. Richard Bauer, Associate Professor 
of History, attended the Phi Alpha Theta 
Convention at San Juan, Puerto Rico. He 
was accompanied by Paul Richmond, pres- 
ident of the University of Maryland Chap- 
ter. 

Dr. Donald Gordon, on Sabbatical leave 
for purposes of research in England, re- 
turns to the campus for the second semes- 
ter. 

Dr. James L. Bates has written an 
article "Josephus Daniels and the Naval 
Oil Reserves, 1913-38." which will appear 
in a forthcoming issue of the Naval In- 
stitute Procei dings. 

Members of the History Department 
staff who attended the recent meetings of 
the American Studies Association include 
Drs. Gcwehr, Merrill. Crosman and Fer- 
guson. 



Corporal, 3rd Infantry 

Joseph W. Shank, Jr., (A.&S. '51) who 
entered the Army in '51, has been pro- 
moted to corporal in Korea with the 3d 
Infantry Division. 

The division, after its third winter on 
the Korean peninsula, has fought in many 
of the most bitter battles of the conflict, 
including the successful fight for "Bloody 
Angle" in '51. 

Rev. Bed Ordained 

Rev. Wm. A. Beal was one of seven 
deacons recently ordained to the priest- 
hood of the Episcopal Church by the Rt. 
Rev. Angus Dun. Bishop of Washington 

Mr. Beal, 29, student chaplain at Uni- 
versity of Maryland after graduating from 
A t V- S in '49 also graduated from Virginia 
Theological Seminary. He is a member of 
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church in Wash- 
ington. He is married. 

In Episcopal Church 

Rev. William Hampton Brady, A&S 
'35, at forty years of age, has been elected 
coadjutor of Fond du Lac, a high position 
in the Episcopal Church. An article con- 
cerning this new responsibility stated, "It 
has been said of Fr. Brady that he has a 
magnetic personality and a decided talent 
for making friends". 

Fr. Brady is rector of St. Paul's, Alton, 
111., diocese of Springfield, and priest-in- 
charge of St. Gabriel's Mission, Wood 
River, 111. Born in Aquasco, Md., in 1912. 
he is married and has four children and 
his career in the church has included: as- 
sistant. Church of the Resurrection, New- 
York City, 1938-40; rector St. Paul's, 
Savannah. Ga„ 1940-48. 

In Germany 

Jean R. Barnes, (A&S '51) has been as- 
signed to Stuttgart. Germany, as a secre- 
tary for the American Red Cross in 
Europe. 

Miss Barnes worked as a secretary for 
the University before joining the Red 
Cross. 

At Stuttgart, her first overseas assign- 
ment, she will assist the Red Cross staff 
which counsels servicemen confronted with 
personal problems. 

90 Red Cross offices are in operation 
in England. France, Germany, Austria, 
Italy, Trieste, French Morocco, and Libya, 
offering these traditional services to mi tu- 
bers of the armed forces. 

In Detroit 

Joseph P. Hamer is the co-author of 
a paper presented at the Annual Meeting 
of the Society of Automotive Engineers 
in Detroit. 

In the paper. "Lubricants — The Surface 
Savers", the authors outline the present 
state of the art regarding the composition 
of lubricants from the standpoint of pro- 
tecting metal parts against mechanical 
and chemical wear. They state that vari- 
ous metals and coatings improve surface 
wear characteristics. Chemical dips, elec- 
troplating, organic finishes, metal sprays, 
anodic coatings, and additive oils are 
included in current techniques. In addi- 
tion, they indicate that there is evidence 
of a trend toward the use of specially 
synthesized lubricants for both aviation 
and automotive service. 



WALTER C. DOE 
& COMPANY 



C^iectrlcat 
Contractors 



602 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 

REpublic 7-1223 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




ART METAL 
FINISHING CO. 

GOLD AND SILVER PLATING 
ANTIQUES REPAIRED & RESTORED 

923- 12th Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 8-1326 



Dr. Haincr. a Section Head in the Esso 
Laboratories of the Standard Oil Develop- 
ment Company, joined In- presenl organi- 
zation in 1947. Be i- a member <>i the 
American Chemical Society and the Amer- 
ican Society of Lubrication Engineers. His 
wife is the former Millie Baitz, (Edu. '40). 

With NPA 

Donald S. Parris, '29. has been appointed 
acting director of the Electronics Division 
of the National Production Authority, U.S. 
Departmenl of Commerce. Mr. 1'arris. 
who has been deputy director of the Elec- 
tronics Division for two years, will serve 
for an indefinite period as XPA represen- 
tative to the Electronics Production Board. 

As acting director of NPA's Electronics 
Division, Mr. Parris will be responsible 
for obtaining and allocating critical ma- 
terials for the manufacture of electronic 
components and end-equipment, ensuring 
the production of adequate quantities of 
electronic products to meet military needs, 
and providing for expansion of the indus- 
try to meet future requirements. 

Mr. Parris. a career Civil Service em- 
ployee, entered the Government in 1935 
with an appointment to the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Depart- 
ment of Commerce. In 1942 he was made 
assistant chief of the Specialties Division, 
with responsibility for trade promotion 
in the field of consumer durable goods, 
including electronics. 

Mr. Parris was placed in charge of the 
Electronic and Communications Equip- 
ment Division of XPA when it was 
established in 1950. He has since served 
as deputy director under four successive 
directors from private industry. 

Cited for Korea 

Leo 1". Blickley. Jr.. A&S '50, was 
awarded the Commendation Ribbon with 
Metal Pendant during ceremonies held 
at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, 
Pa. 

A First Lieutenant in the Army Reserve, 
he was cited for meritorious service in 
Korea from February to July 1952. 

Promoted to Major 

Frank H. Smiley. (A&S '51). has been 
promoted to major. He is serving in Ger- 
many. A bacteriologist, he is stationed at 
the 5th General Hospital in Stuttgart. 

He entered the Army in June 1942 and 
served at the Army Medical Service Grad- 
uate School in Washington, before coming 
to Germany. 

Major Smiley holds a B.S. degree from 
Nebraska, and a master's degree from 
Maryland. During World War II he served 
with the 24th Station Hospital in the 
China-Burma-India theater and with the 
122nd Hospital in Japan. 

Shaw in Korea 

Capt. Robert F. Shaw, who taught Eng- 
lish, 1950-1951. is assigned as headquarters 
commandant of the 45th Infantry Divi- 
sion's 179th Regiment in Korea, his second 
tour of duty with the 45th Division. He 
served with the Division's 180th Regimen! 
during World War II at Anzio. 

Shaw entered the Army in 1942. 

He wears the Bronze Star Medal, Com- 
bat Infantryman Badge with star and the 
American Campaign Medal. 



THE BEST IN 

Hardy 

AZALEAS 

All Colors 
and Sizes 

Wholesale Retail 

Joseph P. Gilmore 

2510 17th STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



^ ASH AM 

UlAIIII 



Jjncozhozatzd 

COMMERCIAL & 
RESIDENTIAL 
PAINTING AND 
DECORATING 

1120 19th ST. 
WASHINGTON. D.C. 
DISTRICT 7-6265 



modern 
machinists co. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 
Washington. D. C. 



Union Welding Co. 

ELECTRIC Cr ACETYLENE 

ALL METALS WELDED 

We make anything out of metal 

Rear 2231 8th St., N.W. 

DUpont 7-9894 Washingt on 



19 



Olney Inn 



Open daily 

Except Mondays 

from Noon to Nine 

for 

Luncheon, Cocktails 

and Dinner 

Old traditions of 

cooking — Maryland's 

finest foods. 

The freshest and 

choicest of 

everything prepared 

just so" served "just so' 



A La Carte Menus 

Wedding Receptions 
Special Parties 
Annual Meetings 

PHONE 

LOCK WOOD 5-0799 

ASHTON 4441 

On State Route No. 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

Open the year 'round 



OTasfnngton 

STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS 

ORNAMENTAL IRON • ALUMINUM 

STAINLESS STEEL • BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

P. H. OTTO, Prop. 

DUpont 7-7550 



Faculty Activities 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor of Soci- 
ology, consulted with members of the 
Air University Human Resources Research 
Institute, at Maxwell Field, Alabama. 

Dr. C. N. Cofer, Professor of Psychol- 
ogy, recently served on a Committee of 
the Associated Research Councils in Wash- 
ington. The Committee studied the appli- 
cations of psychologists for Fulbright 
Awards for 1953-54 and recommended 
qualified persons for awards. 

Dr. R. C. Hackman, Professor of Psy- 
chology, has been granted sabbatical leave 
for the spring semester to study the needs 
of instructors in psychological statistics 
and to prepare a textbook in this field. 

Dr. Charles Murphy, Dr. Carl Bode. Dr. 
Charles Manning. Dr. Emory Mooney, 
Dr. Charles Mish, Dr. John Bradley, Dr. 
Leonard Lutwack. and Mr. George Ander- 
son, of the English Department, and Dr. 
A. E. Zucker. Dr. Dieter Cuntz, and D.\ 
Eleanor Bulatkin. of the Foreign Lan- 
guages Department, attended the annual 
meeting of the Modern Language Asso- 
ciation, held in Boston. 

Dr. Richard W. Iskraut. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physics, published an article 
onl it led "Remarks concerning a paper by 
Wilker" in volume 25 of this year's Hel- 
vetica Physica Acta. Another article by 
Dr. Iskraut, "The Angular Momentum in 
Dirac's Xew Electrodynamics" will be 
published in a forthcoming issue of Nature. 

Professor John Coulter. Pre-law Advisor 
in the College of Arts and Sciences, re- 
cently attended the Pie-legal Education 
Conference sponsored by New York Uni- 
versity's School of Law. 

Dr. Peter J. Lejins. professor of sociology 
at the University, attended a conference of 
community welfare council leaders on Jan- 
uary 8 and 9 in Cleveland, Ohio. 

The Maryland professor attended as 
chairman of the Prince Georges Planning 
Council. The conference was the first of 
its kind to be held in this country, with 
more than 400 representatives from local 
planning councils in attendance. 

Dr. Charles E. White. Professor of 
Chemistry, is author of a chapter on Flu- 
orometric Analysis in a textbook of Mod- 
ern Instrumental Analysis published by 
Prentice Hall. Inc. The book is designed 
for a text in advanced classes and was 
written by ten experts in various fields of 
instrumental analysis. 

Professors Lucius Garvin. John Robin- 
son and Roy Wiig of the Philosophy De- 
partment attended meetings of the Amer- 
ican Philosophical Association in Xew 
York. Dr. Garvin participated in a sym- 
posium on "The Concept of Liniversal Hu- 
man Rights." 

Moril Show in D.C. 

Recent paintings by Herman Maril, As- 
sistant Professor of Art at the University 
of Maryland, were featured at a one man 
show at the Whyte Gallery, Washing- 
ton. 

His work is represented widely in many 
phases of American life, in the New York 
Metropolitan Museum, the Baltimore Mu- 
seum. Phillips Memorial Gallery. American 
University, the Encyclopedia Britannica 
Collection of Contemporary Art, the Cone 
Collection, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
and other collections here and abroad. 



Art galleries in Xew York, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore, Washington, Knoxville, and 
Scranton have held one man exhibitions 
of Professor Maril's work, the most recent 
being a retrospective show in Baltimore. 

"Portrait" 

"Portrait", an oil painting by Mrs. 
Dorothy Champman Loomis. won the first 
'52-'53 Painting of the Month award, one 
of the Art Department's top honors as 
only four are chosen each year. Mrs. 
Loomis obtained her BA at Duke as Fine 
Arts Major and later studied at Iowa and 
took life drawing class in Los Angeles. 
She also taught art in Iowa high schools. 
She is the mother of three children. 

Art Exhibit 

The annual mid-year exhibition of stu- 
dents' work completed in the fall semester 
was held January through February 11th. 

The exhibition consisted of work in vari- 
ous media, including oil. water color, 
casein, and charcoal. This show, four stu- 
dents will be selected as Painting-of-the- 
Month Club winners. A winning painting 
will be exhibited in the LJniversity Ad- 
ministration Building each month of the 
spring term. The selections will be made 
from landscape, portrait, still-life and crea- 
tive work. 

In addition, there will be exhibited a 
head, in plaster, of Dr. Ernest N. Cory, 
head of the Department of Entomology 
at the University and State Entomol- 
ogist of Maryland. The life-size head, 
done when Dr. Cory was five years old, 
was sculptured by Mrs. Adelaide Johnson, 
who is now 107 years old, the oldest out- 
standing living sculpturess in the United 
States. Mrs. Johnson, who says she well 
remembers Abraham Lincoln, was asso- 
ciated with the women's suffrage move- 
ment and executed work on that theme 
in marble at the National Capital. 

The Art Gallery, located on the third 
floor of the Arts and Sciences Building, 
College Park, is open Monday through 
Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



in Inaugural Parade 

The University's Air Force R.O.T.C., in 
two groups, headed by the R.O.T.C. band, 
took part in the Presidential Inaugural 
Parade in Washington, D. C. 




"Don't worry about the work that is piling 
up at the University. You can take care of all 
of it when and if you get back." 



20] 



College of' 



Business & Public 

Administration 



Egbert F. Tingley '27 



Nice Going 

In the recent examinations for the Cer- 
tified Public Accountant degree con- 
ducted by the State of Maryland. Board of 
Examiners and Public- Accountants the 
second, third and fourth highesl marks, 
respectively, were received by graduates 
of the College of Business and Public 
Administration of the University of Mary- 
land. These were : 

2. Kenneth George Emery of Silver 
Spring. 

3. Edward Raskin of Hagerstown. 

4. Robert Lee Gable of Baltimore. 
Ninety -seven candidates successfully 

passed the examinations. 

Speaks in Baltimore 

Dr. J. Allan Cook, professor of market- 
ing, addressed the Baltimore chapter of 
the American Material Handling Society 
at the Engineers Club. 

Dr. Cook's topic was, "Modern Materi- 
als Handling — t he Key to Low-Cost Mar- 
keting." 

During World War II, Dr. Cook, as a 
Navy supply officer, directed the ware- 
housing and handling of materials at con- 
tinental air stations. He later served as 
staff supply officer of Carrier Task Group 
38 in the Pacific area. 

He served as consultant to the city of 
New York in 1948, directing the training 
of analysts employed to appraise the busi- 
ness operations of the city. 

Before joining the University of Mary- 
land's staff in 1948 he taught at the Uni- 
\ ersity of Toronto. 

Faculty Activities 

Dr. John H. Frederick, Professor of 
Transportation, and Dr. E. W. Clemens, 
Professor of Business Administration, took 
part in the program of the American 
Economic Association in Chicago. Dr. 
Frederick discussed the subject "Prospec- 
tive Developments in Federal Regulation 
of Transportation" and Dr. Clemens was 
Chairman of a meeting dealing with 
distribution and utilization of natural gas. 

Mr. Arno F. Knapper, Instructor in the 
College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, was elected secretary of the Book- 
keeping Accounting and Round Table 
of the National Business Teachers' Asso- 
ciation at. the group's annual convention 
in Chicago during the Christmas holidays. 

Rotary Scholarship 

George Little, Jr. of Houston, Texas, 
(BS, B&PA '51) is one of 95 outstanding 
students from 30 countries who have been 
awarded Fellowships by Rotary Interna- 
tional for advanced study abroad in 1953- 
54. 

These young men and women are the 
recipients of fellowships awarded by Rotary 
International, world-wide service club or- 
ganization, as one of its contributions to- 



ward the goal of promoting international 
understanding, good will ami peace. The 
one-year fellowship grants range from 
$1,800 to $3,400 each, and total approxi- 
mately $250,000. Little will go to Latin 
America. 

In Tokyo 
l.t. Bill Cook and Judy McKeown 
Cook (both BPA '50) are living in Tokyo, 
Japan. Bill is stationed with the Far 
East Air Forces. Bill is a former Kappa 
Alpha; Judy an AOPi. They expect to 
return to the United States in August. 

Speaks in New York 

The Mutual Benefit Life Insurance 
Company called on Robert D. Condon 
('42, B P A) to make the major address at 
the Company's annual winter meeting in 
New York. Bob, who now lives in Rich- 
mond, addressed veteran insurance men 
about the technique of developing new 
prospects and clinching the sale. He is 
the first man in the company's history to 
win three sales awards in his first year 
as an insurance man. They were for 
number of persons insured, volume of 
business, and commissions. 
New Atlas 

As another step in the University's proj- 
ect of publishing an atlas of the world's 
resources, Volume II of this ambitious 
work has been released. 

Titled "Mineral Resources," it covers 
thorough discussions on 29 minerals. Maps 
were drafted and prepared by cartog- 
raphers in the geography department under 
the supervision of Dr. William VanRoyen, 
head, and Oliver Bowles. Various texts 
were written by experts of the United 
States Bureau of Mines. 

"Its value to all students of economic, 
social, political, and world problems is very 
great, since no other clear portrayal of 
world minerals is available," remarked 
George J. Miller, of Indiana University, 
writing in advance of the volume's publi- 
cation. 

The new atlas is dedicated to Dr. Oliver 
Baker, former head of Maryland's depart- 
ment of geography "whose lifelong interest 
in graphic and cartographic presentation 
was largely responsible for the inception 
of this work, and whose counsel was in- 
valuable throughout." 

Addresses M & M 

Dr. J. Allan Cook recently addressed 
the Merchandising Group of the Wash- 
ington, D. C. Merchants and Manufac- 
turers' Association on "The Manpower 
Problem." 

Home from Korea 

Sgt. Terry L. Ramsay, who attended 
B&PA, '48-'51, prior to induction in Feb- 
ruary, 1951 has returned from Korea on 
rotation. 

Ramsay, a company clerk with the 538 
Ordnance Medium Automotive Mainte- 
nance Company, (8th Army) wears the 
UN Service Ribbon and the Korean Serv- 
ice Ribbon with 3 campaign stars. 
With "Heartbreak Division" 

PFC Sanford F. Golden, who attended 
B&PA, '49- '50, is serving in Korea with the 
2nd Infantry Division, famous for victories 
at "Heartbreak Ridge" in 1951 and "Old 
Baldy" in July, '51. 

Golden is with the 23rd "Invaders" Regi- 
ment's Heavy Mortar Company. 




• FRUIT TREES 

• ASPARAGUS ROOTS 

• STRAWBERRIES 

• SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 

• ROSES • HEDGES 

• FLOWERING SHRUBS 




Write now for BIG FREE 1953 
catalog. Forty colorful pages 
packed with information, shows 
all the Bunting flowers, plants, 
berries, small fruits, evergreens 
and trees. Guaranteed to start 
you reaching for a hoe! Write 
today ! 



BUNTINGS' 

NURSERIES, INC. 

box no 

SELBYVILLE, DELAWARE 




concrete 
products co. 

CINDER • SLAG • LINTELS 
CONCRETE BLOCKS 

cen tervi I le, m d . 



21 



RAISE CHINCHILLAS 

The hobby with a future 




INTERESTING & PROFITABLE 

Many have developed a profitable and 
interesting business by starting with 
chinchillas as a hobby. 

LITTLE COMPETITION 

Chinchillas are extinct in the wild. 
Unlike other fur industries, there is 
no competition from wild pelts. 

A NEW INDUSTRY 

Chinchilla farming is in its infancy. 
Little space is needed for a business 
of unpredictable magnitude. 

Visit our chinchilla farm or write 
for full information 

SPARKS' 
CHINCHILLA FARM 

5885 Rollins Ave., Seat Pleasant Md. 
JOrdan 8-6339 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 

ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



J 


. NICHOLS 




— WHOLESALE- 




FANCY 




FRUITS & 




PRODUCE 




Lincoln 7-4888 


UNION MARKET TERMINAL 


1278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix '34 
z^^^^^^^=, Gardiner P. H. Foley 
New Dean at Baylor 

Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23, has 
been appointed Dean of the Baylor 
University College of Dentistry in Dallas. 
Texas, making him the third among Mary- 
land graduates who are presently serving 
as Deans of dental schools, the others be- 
ing Dr. J. Ben Robinson '14 of the B. C. 
D. S„ and Dr. Frank J. Houghton '17 of 
the Loyola University (New Orleans) 
School of Dentistry. The hundreds of 
alumni who have known Dr. McCarthy 
as a student, teacher, and alumnus extend 
their warm congratulations to a distin- 
guished graduate who has brought gnat 
honor to his alma mater by his new status 
in the field of dental education. 

Born in Swanton, Vt., in 1896. He studied 
at the Pace and Pace Institute in New 
York City, followed by several years as a 
cost accountant with the Remington Arms 
Company of Bridgeport, Conn. He grad- 
uated from Maryland with honors. Re- 
turning as an instructor he served his 
alma mater for twenty-nine years. 

Dr. McCarthy has been very active in 
local, state and national affairs. He is a 
past president of the Baltimore City Den- 
tal Society and of the Maryland State 
Dental Association. A member of Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon. he served two terms as 
National President of the society. He is 
a Fellow of the American College of Den- 
tists (1937). He has been a delegate from 
Maryland at several American Dental As- 
sociation meetings and represented the 
state association at the International Den- 
tal Congress held in Paris in 1931. He 
has presented essays and clinics before 
dental meetings in many states and in 
Puerto Rico. Active in the meetings of 
the American Association of Dental 
Schools, he has served as chairman of 
several sections and conferences. An ex- 






HARRY B. MCCARTHY, D.D.S., '23 

Appointed Dean of Baylor University Col- 
lege of Dentistry. 



cellent organizer and administrator he has 
represented his School and profession in 
many civic undertakings. A charter mem- 
ber of the North Baltimore Kiwanis Club, 
lie also is a member of the Maryland His- 
torical Society, the American Association 
of University Professors, the Federation 
Dentaire Internationale, and the Shrine. 
He has been prominent in the activities of 
Psi Omega. In his senior year, he was 
Grand Master of the Chapter. He served 
as ( hand Master of the Oriole Alumni 
Chapter (Baltimore) and also as Grand 
Master of the National Alumni Chapter. 

Since the beginning of the 1952-53 aca- 
demic year the McCarthys have been hon- 
ored by a dinner given by the Dallas 
County Dental Society on November 3 
and by a reception given by the Trustees 
of Baylor University on December 4. A 
large group of Mac's fellow alumni were 
pleased to greet him in St. Louis in Sep- 
tember. 

In Ryukyus 
Lieutenant Robert L. Mohn ( D.D S. '47) 
is serving in the Ryu- 
kyus Army command. 
Lieutenant Mohn's 
wife and two daugh- 
ters live in Candor, 
N. C. Previous to his 
new assignment with 
the RYCOM's Army 
Hospital, he was sta- 
tioned with IN Corps 
Headquarters in Ko- 
rea. He is a graduate 
Lt. Mohn of Wake Forest. 

Personals 

Dr. Jason R. Lewis '42 announces the 
removal of his office to the Lee Medical 
Building. 1805 Monument Ave.. Richmond. 
Ya. Dr. Lewis is engaged in the practice 
of pedodontia. 

Dr. Jack R. Martin '52 announces the 
opening of an office for the general prac- 
tice of dentistry in the Kanawha Banking 
ami Trust Building. Charleston. W. Ya. 

Dr. Clarence W. Rader '50. formerly 
associated with Dr. C. R. Adams in 
Charleston, W. Ya., has recently gone to 
Akron, Ohio, where he is affiliated with 
Dr. Ewing. 

Dr. John Miller '52 is associated with 
Dr. S. W. King in South Charleston. W. 
Ya. 

Dr. Ray V. Allen '52 has opened an 
office in Nitro, W. Ya. 

Dr. Robert H. Orrahood '52 has opened 
an office at 513 East Main St.. Clarks- 
burg. YV. Va. 

Dr. Harold Schwartz '42 announces the 
opening of his Manhattan office at 417 
Fifth Avenue, New York 16. Dr. Schwartz 
is continuing to conduct a practice in 
Belle Harbor. 

Class Reunion Chairmen 

1903 — The returning graduates of the 
fifty-year groups will be the guests of the 
National Alumni Association at a dinner 
given in their honor at the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel on the evening of March 4. Dr. 
D. Robert Swinehart, Medical Arts Build- 
ing. Baltimore 1. is in charge of the ar- 
rangements. 

1908— Solomon B. Hoffman. 2036 Eutaw 
Place, Baltimore 17. 

B. Holly Smith. 405 N. Charles St., 
Baltimore 1. 



1913— Joel Fleishman, Latrobe Apart- 
ments, N. Charles and Head Sis.. Balti- 
more 1. 

Wilbur 0. Ramsey. 618 W. Lombard 
St., Baltimore 1. 

1918— Walter E. Hutson, 1900 Maryland 
Ave., Baltimore 18. 

Harry J. I.ehr. S44 W. 36th St.. Balti- 
more 11. 

1923— C. Clifton Coward, 2.501 E. Pres- 
ton St., Baltimore 13. 

Charles Si me. Sr.. 6305 Belair Rd., Bal- 
timore 6. 

1928— Paul A. Deems, 835 Park Ave., 
Baltimore 1. 

1933— Philip L. Block, 36 N, Luzerne 
Ave., Baltimore 24. 

1938— A. Bernard Eskow, Medical Arts 
Building, Baltimore 1. 

1943— Herbert S. Levy, 2922 Eutaw 
Place. Baltimore 17. 

H. Kent Tongue, 110 W. Monument 
St., Baltimore 1. 

(Joint reunion of March and November 
Classes). 

1948— Jose Medina. 618 W. Lombard 
St., Baltimore 1. 

General Committee: George M. Ander- 
son. Alumni Chairman; Lawrence 1 W. 
Bimestefer, Arthur Davenport, Ethelbert 
Lovett, John Michael. Kdmond Vanden 
Bosche, Myron S. Aisenberg, Faculty 
Chairman; Joseph C. Biddix, Gardner P. 
H. Foley. Grayson W. Gaver, William E. 
Halm, Marion W. McCrea, Katharine 
Toomey. 

Women's Committee: Mrs. John H. Mi- 
chael, Chairman: Mrs. Harry Levin. Mrs. 
J. Bon Robinson, Miss Katharine Toomey. 
Mrs. Howard Van Natta. 

Committee for Testimonial Dinner: 
Grayson W. Caver and Daniel E. Shehan, 
Co-Chairmen; Joseph C. Biddix, C. Adam 
Bock. George Clendenin, Paul Deems, 
Harry Levin. Eugene Pessagno, Leon Selig- 
man. Edward Stone. Arthur Wheeler. 

Senior Seminar Program 

The 1952-1953 seminar program for sen- 
iors includes presentations by several 
prominent contributors in fields other than 
dentistry: Dr. Sacks, hematologist. of the 
Medical School faculty; Dr. Weinberg, 
pathologist, of Sinai Hospital; Dr. Ward, 
oncologist, of the Maryland and Johns 
Hopkins medical schools; Dr. Figge, of 
the Medical School's Department of Anat- 
omy; Dr. Binford. of the Armed Forces 
Insiitute of Pathology; Dr. R. S. Fisher, 
Chief Medical Examiner of the State of 
Maryland; Dr. R. S. Lloyd, National In- 
stitute of Health; and Dr. L. Lebo, in- 
ternist, associated with the Dental School's 
Department of Oral Diagnosis. 

September 17 and 24 — Dr. H. B. McCauley 

"Fluorine in Dental Health" 
October 1 and 8 — Dr. M. S. Aisenberg 

"Tumors of Dental Origin" 
October 15 and 22 — Dr. M. S. Aisenberg 

"Malignant Tumors That Have Metasta- 
sized to the Jaws" 
October 29 and November 5 — Dr. J. Ben Rob- 
inson 

"Professional Ethics in Student Relation- 
ships" 
November 12 and 19 — Dr. M. Sacks 

"The Leukemias" 
December 3 and 10 — Dr. T. Weinberg 

"Tumors of the Salivary Glands" 
January 7 and 14 — Dr. Grant E. Ward 

"Irradiation Therapy in Cancer" 
January 21 and 28— Dr. F. H. Figge 

"Radioisotopes in Cancer" 
February 4 and 11— Dr. C. H. Binford 

"Lymph Node Enlargement in the Neck" 
February 18 and 25 — Dr. C. L. Inman 

"Cellulitis and Osteomyelitis" 



March 11 and IS— Dr. R. S. Fisher 

"Forensic Dentistry" 
March 23 and April 1 — Dr. R. S. Lloyd 

"Maxiilo-facial Prosthesis" 
April 8 and 15 — Dr. M. S. Aisenberg 

"Cancer in and about Oral Cavity" 
April 22 and 29— Dr. L. Lebo 

"Rheumatic Fever and Subacute Bacterial 
Endocarditis" 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 

Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 

Col. O. II. Saunders ' 10 
A Lawrence Guess '51 




General Manager, Bell Telephone Lab. 

Jim Dingman, Engineering '22, has been 
elected Vice President and General 
Manager of the Bell Telephone Labora- 
tories, the nation's largest research organi- 
zation. The Laboratories, of which Jim 
i> also a Director, is part of the Bell 
System. Its mission is 
to develop communi- 
cations equipment 
which will provide tin 
best possible service. 
In addition to re- 
search and fundamen- 
tal developments for 
the Bell System tele- 
^^k H phone companies, the 

I^^^B I Laboratories are re- 
B ^ I sponsible for embody- 

H fmm A I ing the results of their 
V. Pres. Dingman research and develop- 
ment in designs suit- 
able for manufacture by the Western 
Electric Company, the manufacturing unit 
of the Bell System. 

During the Second World War, a major 
share of effort was devoted to military 
developments, particularly in such essen- 
tial fields as communications, radar, sub- 
marine detection, control of gunfire and 
electronic gun sights. After the war, mili- 
tary projects were continued on a restric- 
ted scale. Since Korea, these programs 
have been enlarged and the Laboratories 
now devote nearly half of their efforts 
to projects for the armed forces, including 
the strategic atomic bomb project at 
Sandia, New Mexico, and guided missiles. 
After graduating from Maryland with 
a degree in mechanical engineering. Ding- 
man began his Bell System service as a 
tester with the Western Electric Company. 
In 1923 he was transferred to the Long 
Lines organization of AT&T, as equipment 
attendant and after filling a number of 
posts in the Long Lines Plant Department, 
he became Employee Relations Manager 
in 1943. In 1949 he was elected Vice Presi- 
dent — Personnel of the Bell Telephone 
Company of Pennsylvania and the Dia- 
mond State Telephone Company. In 1950 
he became Vice President — Operations and 
a Director of those companies. 

All during his successful Bell System 
career, Jim has maintained an active in- 
teresl in the University and its Alumni 
Association. For several years he was 
President of the Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Metropolitan New York. Jim's 
>on is now a student at Maryland. 

Dingman is very modest about his sue- 



at Amazingly 

LOW FARES i 




• Greyhound serves all U.S.A.! 

• Schedules to fit any plan! 

• Low fares easy on budget! 

• The friendly way to travel! 



GREYHOUND 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manuracfurers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



TO SAVE FUEL 

see DR. BUELL for 

CARBURETOR & IGNTION 
SERVICE 

81 l-10th St., N.W. ME 8-5777 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 



23 



c 


Automatic 


A 


Merchandisers 


N 


. . . Serving the 


D 

1 

M 


University of 


Maryland 


CANDY 
CIGARETTES 


A 


SOFT DRINKS 


T 


Quality Merchandise 




Nationally Known 
Brands 


C 
O 

INC. 


Up-to-date Equipment 
PEobody 7700 


2124 Cambridge St. 
Baltimore 31, Md. 



Wholesalers of 
Plumbing & Heating Materials 

SCHUMACHER & 
SEILER. INC. 

MAIN OFFICE & STORE 
MONUMENT ST. & HARFORD AVE. 
SA. 0800 Baltimore 2, Md. 



H0PW00D 

Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

BALTIMORE • WASHINGTON 
ALEXANDRIA 

Towson & Beason Streets 

PL. 0433 BALTIMORE 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company- 
Daily Service Between 
Baltimore - Washington - Annapolis 

Lexington 1756 
1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



cess in the Bell System and his position 
as Vice President and General Manager 
of a Laboratories whose products are ideas, 
inventions and designs and whose em- 
ployees number 8,000 — some 2.700 profes- 
sional scientists and engineers with many 
having world-wide reputations. However. 
Jim doesn't hesitate to say that his train- 
ing at Maryland has been of inestimable 
help in his profession. 

In Miami 

Henry O. Mikelait. (Engr.. '50) wrote 
Dean Steinberg recently, asking that his 
name be removed from the Job Oppor- 
tunity Service listings in the Dean's office, 
as Mikelait reports he has just accepted 
a position offered in Miami, Florida. The 
Job Opportunity Service, started by the 
Engineering Alumni Board, and operated 
through the hearty cooperation of Dean 
Steinberg's office, has listings of available 
jobs in engineering, especially in the 
higher brackets of skills and salaries, and, 
it is reported, has more jobs than appli- 
cants these days. 

Robert S. Caruthers, '26 

Robert S. Caruthers. (E.E. '26) was 
heard from recently, and some extracts 
from his letter follow. 

"I wish to convey my thanks and ap- 
preciation to you, (Dean Steinberg) to the 
faculty and to student members of the 
honorary engineering fraternity, Tau Beta 
Pi. for the honor of being elected to mem- 
bership in the Maryland Beta chapter 

"As you see, I am now in California 
and find myself having to cheer for two 
football teams, both Maryland and Stan- 
ford. Two members of my family are 
Stanfordites ; my son in the undergradu- 
ate Physics Department and my wife in 
the Graduate School. As for myself, after 
23 years at Bell Telephone Laboratories 
helping to build up the communications 
art in the telephone system, I am now do- 
ing the same thing for the independent 
field in the United States, Canada and 
South America. The Lenkurt Electric Co., 
where I am coordinator of engineering 
activity, is a ''little brother" combination 
of Bell Telephone Laboratories and the 
Western Electric Co. I wish you would 
extend my greetings to Professor Cor- 
coran, Professor Hodgins, . . . and others 
that may remember me there at College 
Park ..." 

Near-Identical Records 

Lt. Robert G. Mathey. (CJS. '51) and 
Lieut, Charles G. Clarke, (C.E. '51) are 
two whose Alumni History Records are 
so nearly identical as to be practically 
interchangeable. These two engineers, 
who went through four years of Univer- 
sity life together, graduated together, and 
entered the Air Force together, have pro- 
gressed step by step, always together, 
and are now stationed at Patrick Air 
Force Base, Florida. Their specialty is in 
connection with "guided missiles" at that 
Base. 

Lieut, Mathey, whose home address is 
3113 Varnum Street, Mt. Rainier. Md.. 
now has an official address of Box 757, 
Patrick AFB, Florida, while. Lieut. Clarke, 
whose home address is 4026 Haywood 
Avenue, Baltimore 15, Md., has an offi- 



cial address of Box 700, Patrick AFB, 
Florida. 

Lieut. Mathey was on the campus early 
in January, and from him we learned these 
facts. 

Upon entering the Air Force, Lieuten- 
ants Mathey and Clarke attended a suc- 
cession of schools together, such as basic 
training, aerial photography, project en- 
gineering, guided missiles, and both saw 
duty with the U.S. Coast and Geodetic 
Survey for training for duty in selecting 
and locating Guidance Stations. Both are 
members of the 1st Pilot less Bomber 
Squadron of Patrick AFB, Florida, and 
their duties as survey officers selecting 
sites for Guidance Stations have taken 
them on extensive trips to Nassau, San 
Salvador, Puerto Rico and the Virgin 
Islands. 

Mathey reports they belong to the 
American Society of Civil Engineers; the 
Society of American Military Engineers; 
and to Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. 

We trust that the Damon and Pythias 
association of these two young engineers 
may long continue. 

Others at the Patrick Air Force Base 
from the Class of 1952 include Edwin E. 
Westerfield — EE, Charlotte Schellhas 
Westerfield — CE, Ellsworth Boyd— CE, 
Jerry Kostas — CE, and Walter Jennings— 
CE. 

Heads Red Cross 

Mr. Leland Worthington, Class of '25, 
College of Agriculture, has accepted for 
the third time in succession the Chairman- 
ship of the Red Cross Drive in Prince 
Georges County. The Drive will last 
through the month of March. The quota 
set is S36.900. 

National Sand and Gravel 

The 7th annual short course of instruc- 
tion on aggregates and concrete was spon- 
sored joint ly by the College of Engineer- 
ing, the National Sand and Gravel Asso- 
ciation and the National Ready Mixed 
Concrete Association. There were 115 in- 
dustry-sponsored representatives in at- 
tendance compared with the previous high 
enrollment of 102 at the 1949 course. The 
course had for its purpose the instruction 
of representatives of member companies 
of the two Associations in basic and fun- 
damental technical information on aggre- 
gates and concrete. Students taking the 
complete course were awarded a certificate 
signed by Dean Steinberg and by Presi- 
dent By id. 

Ed Ziegler '47 who has been with the 
Sand and Gravel Association at the Uni- 
versity since 1947 is now with Associated 
Consulting Engineers in Baltimore. 

Graduate Job Placements 

In preparation for the influx of about 
300 companies desiring interviews with 
engineering students, a meeting was called 
by Dean Steinberg of all senior students 
and faculty representatives in the College 
of Engineering. The group was addressed 
by Mr. Kneble. job placement director, 
who made suggestions to aid the seniors 
in signing for these recruiting interviews. 

Field Trip 

All faculty and students were invited to 
attend the 34th annual National Metal 
Exposition in Philadelphia. About 150 
accepted the invitation. 



24 



Aeronautical Engineering 

The Aeronautical Engineering Depart- 
ment recently added to its faculty Eugeni 
G. Hertler. who comes from Convair in 
San Diego. Cal. In addition to his in- 
dustry experience, Mr. Hertler also has 
his M.S. degree in Aerodynamics from the 
University of Michigan. 

Senior students in Aeronautical Engi- 
neering went on a tour through Fairchild 
Aircraft in Hagerstown, Maryland. 

Branimir Djordjevic, of Yugoslavia, is 
enrolled as a graduate studenl in Aero- 
nautical Engineering. He graduated from 
the University of Belgrade with high hon- 
ors and also served time as an officer in 
the Yugoslavia Army. He received a fel- 
lowship and came to Maryland under 
auspices of the Mutual Security Agency. 

The semi-annual meeting of the LAS. 
in New York in January was attended by 
A. V>~. Sherwood, G. Corning and A. L. 
Guess. 

Chemical Engineering 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff presented a paper 
before the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers in Cleveland, at their Sym- 
posium on Filtration. The paper was 
based on the thesis of Edwin A. Gee. and 
was entitled: "Incremental Digestion — A 
Xew Method for Beneficiating the Filtra- 
tion Characteristics of Certain Acid De- 
composed Silicates". 

Civil Engineering 

Professor Russell B. Allen attended a 
meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
National Society of Professional Engi- 
neers in Richmond over a period of three 
days. One of the principal speakers was 
T. Coleman Andrews new head of the 
Bureau of Internal Revenue. Professor 
Allen also attended an Executive meeting 
of the N.S.P.E. 

Civil Engineering senior students have 
been rounding out their education with 
several field trips. During recent months 
they visited Rocky Gorge Dam which 
is under construction, the Bethlehem Steel 
Company at Sparrow's Point and an open 
meeting of the Highway Research Counsel. 

Library 

The College of Engineering has among 
its facilities a very impressive library. It 
contains over 11.000 volumes on both 
graduate and under graduate level and 
over 500 technical periodicals are currently 
received. Also contained in the library 
are a collection of manufacturers catalogs, 
college catalogs, traffic surveys from vari- 
ous parts of the country and a file on 
various companies offering engineering 
employment . 

At present the Engineering Library is 
located in the Engineering Building, but 
in the very near future will be moved to 
the new Mathematics Building now under 
construction. One complete wing of this 
building will lie devoted to a library com- 
bining all the mathematics, physics and 
engineering books on campus. There will 
be a reading room on the first floor with 
three stack floors above. All stack floors 
will be open to the students and will con- 
tain dozens of individual study desks. 
some equipped with typewriters. There 
will also be small conference rooms 



equipped with blackboards for groups who 

wish to study together. The stack floors 
will also contain lockers so that students 
may leave their book- in a safe place. 

A micro-film room equipped with mi- 
cro-film and micro-card leaders will lie 
provided on one of the stack floors and 
in all the new library will contain space 
for approximately 125.000 volumes. The 
reading room will provide comfortable 
lounge chairs as well as the modern light 

birch furniture that i> presently being used 
in the Engineering Library. 

The new library is open in the evening 
hours as well as during the daytime. 

Personals 

Lt. B. E. Prescott, Jr. ('51) is with the 
Airforce at Griffiss Airforce Base in Rome, 
N. Y. 

W. M. Cooney ('52) is with the Air- 
force in Nevada. 

In Korea 

Capt. James D. Crammond is serving in 
Korea with the 25th Infantry Division. 

His unit has been in Korea longer than 
any other American division. 

Capt. Crammond. a member of the S-2 
(intelligence) section in the 65th Engineer 
Combal Battalion, has served in Korea 
since last February. 

Crammond attended the University of 
Maryland and George Washington 
University. 

With 24th Division 

Lt. Col. C. C. Holbrook, (Engr. '39) is 
Engineer Officer with the 24th Infantry 
Division. 

Receiving intensive field training, his 
unit is part of the security forces in Japan. 
Before being rotated out of the line early 
in 1952, the 24th spent 19 months in Korea. 

Colonel Holbrook entered the Army in 
1940. After returning to the U.S. in 1946 
from the Far East, he attended the Com- 
mand and General Staff School at Fort 
Leavenworth. Kans. 

With Hughes Aircraft 

Weldon E. Combs (Engr., '52) has 
joined the technical staff of the Field En- 
gineering Department. Hughes Aircraft 
Research and Development Laboratories, 
Culver City. California. 

To Puerto Rico 

Dean S. S. Steinberg has been named 
advisor to the School of Engineering of 
the University of Puerto Rico at Maya- 
guez. He is scheduled to visit the island 
commonwealth early in March to confer 
with University administrative officers and 
faculty members on the development of 
their engineering curricula and facilities. 

In Casablanca 

Frank Holloway, Civil Engineer of Class 
of 1931. i> m Casablanca, North Africa, 
-iivmg as Construction Manager for the 
Architect'.- office on I'.S.A. airport con- 
struction. 

His company, incidentally, has not been 
one of those subjected to Congressional 
cut icism. 



FAIRHAVEN 

FARMS 

DAIRY 

Serving the 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

OF BALTIMORE 



SYKESVILLE, MD. 



Mccormick 

& CO., Inc. 

The World's Largest 
Spice and Extract House 

• BALTIMORE 

• NEW YORK 

• SAN FRANCISCO 

P.S. And be sure to buy 
the tea with the big Mc! 



1_ 




Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 0020 



25] 



[zfrLenoli] <jtosts 

to the 
L\Yiiversiti) [yolks 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find comfort and conveni- 
ence at your beck and call! 

Free Parking 

Rooms & Cottages 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Ave. 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



School of: 



LUSTINE NICHOLSON 

• Ckevxolet 

• Olddmooile 



PHIL LUSTINE 
head of both comjxinii 



Serving .student* and alumni of the 
University of Maryland for 20 years. i 



BALTIMORE AVE. HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

ON ROUTE 1 WARFIELD 7-7200 ! 




University 

■REPAIR 
SHOP 

M ound and TV 
technicians to 
the University 

509 COLLEGE AVE. 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

AP 7-3425 

BILL HUFF 




Nursing 



Barbara Ardis '45 



In Westminster 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Burgess are living 
in Westminster, Md. They have two 
little girls, Sandra Lee and Deborah Ann. 
Deborah Ann was born on December 31, 
1!),50. Mrs. Burgess graduated in June 1949. 

In Newcostle 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Bankert moved 
to 1 Landers Lane, Swanwyck Gardens, in 
New Castle, Delaware in April 1952. Mrs. 
Bankert was Eva Laigneil, '30. 

Home Director 

Miss Bernice E. Brittain, Director of 
Nurses at the Salisbury General Hospital 
resigned in October. 1952. Miss Brittain 
is Director for the Home for Incurables 
in Baltimore, Maryland. Mrs. Mary Vir- 
ginia Banes Layfield, Class 1937, succeeded 
Miss Brittain, as Director of Nurses at 
the Salisbury General Hospital, Salisbury, 
Md. 

For Honduras 

Mrs. Hadv Brown Macis, '19, and wife 
of Dr. Salvador A. Macis, of Puerto 
Cortes, Honduras, C. A. spent several 
weeks in November at the University 
Hospital studying the administration of 
the central supply room. Mrs. Macis has 
been requested to open a similar depart- 
ment in the Lima Hospital for the United 
Fruit Company in Honduras, C. A. Mrs. 
Macis was honor guest at a luncheon given 
by her former classmate in Westminster. 
Maryland, Mrs, Mercedes Brown Duvall. 
Present were, Mrs. F. Vernon Preston, 'nee 
Kling, of Baltimore, Mrs. Z. N. Beach 
'nee Lohse, of Wallingford, Conn.. Mrs. 
Dennis Smith, 'nee Mitchell, of Westmin- 
ster. Md., Mrs. Harry Juelg, 'nee Nichols, 
of Baltimore, and Mrs. Newell M. Doug- 
lass, 'nee Zepp, of Pittsburgh. Pa. The 
same group were entertained at dinner the 
same evening by Mrs. Dennis Smith. 

Mrs. Harry Juelg, Class 1919, entertained 
at a luncheon the following: Mrs. Salvador 
A. Macis, Class 1919, Mrs. G. Wilmer 
Duvall, nee Brown, Mrs. Dennis Smith, 
nee Edna Mitchell, and Mrs. Z. N. Beach, 
nee Miss Agnes Lohse. 

In Baltimore 

Mrs. George H. Holman, '19, spent some 
time in Baltimore on account of illness in 
her family. While Mrs. Holman, nee 
Annette Aldrich, was in Baltimore a lun- 
cheon was given for her and Mrs. Salvador 
A. Macis at Miller Brothers in Baltimore 
Present were, the above, and Mrs. Harry 
Jeulg, Mrs. G. Wilmer Brown, Mrs. Dennis 
Smith, and Bessie Maston Arnurius. 

To Miami 

Miss Helen W. Winks. '51, has resigned 
her position as Supervisor in Pediatrics at 
the University Hospital to return to her 
home in Coral Gables, Florida, to attend 
the University of Miami. 

At Macon, Ga. 

Mrs. Emalina B. Chambers, '01, has been 
Director and Supervisor of the Out Patient 



Department of the Macon City Hospital 
Macon. Georgia, for a number of years 
She writes us that her Florence Nightin- 
gale Cap attracts much attention and 
admiration. 

At Wooster, O. 

Mrs. Brooks P. Ebert has resigned her 
position with the Public Health Depart- 
ment in Wooster, Ohio, after having been 
there seven years. Mrs. Ebert accepted a 
position with two doctors for office work 
the first of September. Mrs. Ebert was 
Martha Skinner, '33. 

At Sykesville 

Mrs. Martha Hastings Garheart, '28, has 
a position at Springfield State Hospital, 
Sykesville, Md. 

At Kimberton, Pa. 

Mrs. Nancy Franklin Hartsock, '47, 
writes that her husband is stationed at 
the Veteran's Hospital at Phoenixville, 
Pennsylvania. The family is thoroughly 
enjoying the country life offered by the 
community, in their home at Kimberton, 
Pa. 

From Italy 

A lot of news was received on one small 
postcard from Phyllis Sliney, Class of 1946. 
She was married on October 20, 1951 in 
Levarao, Italy to Dr. Robert E. Lee who 
was stationed there in the Army. They 
returned home in May of 1952 and she 
settled down to the duties of housewife 
and mother in Framingham, Massachu- 
setts. Yes, mother! Their son, Patrick 
James, was born on August 10, 1952. 

Return to Baltimore 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Arthur, Jr., have 
returned to Baltimore. Dr. Arthur is res- 
ident in Obstetrics at the University 
Hospital. Mrs. Arthur is doing private 
duty musing. 

In Chicago 

Miss Juanita Buekner, '51, started a 
postgraduate course in operating room 
technique and management at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago Hospital Clinics, Chicago. 

In Baltimore 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Roemer have 
moved into their new home at 1101 Cooks 
Lane, Baltimore, Md. Mrs. Roemer was 
Joan Seiders, Class 1949. 

Captain Now 

Irma H. Winfield, '38, has been pro- 
moted to Captain in the A.N.C. 

In Munich 

Marguerite Foster, class '39, (Capt. 
ANC) is now stationed in Munich. Her 
new address is 98th General Hospital, APO 
108. c/oPM New York. 

In Tennessee 

Freda Fazenbaker Gill, class '29, writes 
from Kingsport, Tenn. that after a long 
illness this summer she is gradually getting 
back on her feet. She is one of the super- 
visors in the Director's Office of the Hol- 
ston Valley Community Hospital, and is 
teaching an advanced course in Medical 
and Surgical Nursing to Practical Nurses. 
She also writes us that Edith Hilbert 
Mann, class 1945. is in charge of the 
Emergency room at Holston Valley Com- 
munity Hospital. Of course they find 



26 



much to talk about whenever they get 
together. 

At Dayton, Ohio 
Mrs. Grace Colbum Hunter. "48, is at 
Wright Patterson Field in Dayton. Ohio. 
She and her husband have managed to 
make quite a tour of the country in the 
past two years. She took time out from 
her travels to welcome a son, Robert, Jr., 
on January 5, 1952. 

To California 

Ellen Sirman LiPira, '46. writes that 
they are pulling up stakes since her hus- 
band has been called into the service. 
They are expecting to go to Sacramento, 
Calif. 

Busy GirS 

Sara \V. Edwards, '26. is leading a full 
life at Butler. Penn. She is carrying on 
her husband's business and finds additional 
time to belong to an Executive Club, of 
which she is a charter member and one 
of the two women members. She has also 
found tin time for a Poetry Club and a 
Painting Club. Besides all this she 
squeezes in lectures on "BE KIND to 
ANIMALS," introducing films and maga- 
zines, in the county schools. With all of 
these she writes about other people's 
energies. 



College of 



Fellowship Open 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Con- 
necticut offers twelve scholarships of $1600 
renewable for the second year and com- 
mencing in the fall of 1953. Applications 
must be received by April 15 and should 
be sent to Ernest Stabler, Chairman, 
Master of Arts in Teaching Program at 
Wesleyan University. Open to qualified 
college graduate and leading to a degree 
of Master of Arts m Teaching, the- pro- 
gram is designed to provide professional 
training in a liberal arts environment. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

NEAR UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-2995 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



F O L L I N'S 

Sales and Service 

UNion 4-1500 College Park, Md. 



Del Haven White House Cottages 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 50 Brick Cottages 

Tile Baths 
F. M. IRWIN, Proprietor TOWER 9-4852 



Education 




Mrs. Gainey 



June Jacobs Brown '48 

Mrs. Kathryn J. Carney 1 Ed. '49) re- 
cently received a letter of apprecia- 
tion from the commanding officer of the 
32d Antiaircraft Ar- 
tillery Battalion, the 
U.S. Army's senior 
tactical command in 
the United Kingdom. 
Mrs. Gainey, who has 
been teaching for the 
Brigade's Intermedi- 
ate Education pro- 
gram in Mildenhall, 
England has volun- 
teered to go on teach- 
ing, without compen- 
sation, because the 
Brigade's educational 
fund has been exhausted. She is the wife 
of Lt. Maurice Gainey (Mil. Sci. '50) 
transportation officer for the 32d AAA 
Brigade. Mrs. Gainey, who arrived in 
England in July 1951. formerly taught 
at the Mount Rainier High School and 
was recreational director with the District 
of Columbia Recreation Department. 

Home from Germany 

PFC Rodger L. Gellhaus, (Ed. '50) has 
returned from Germany for release from 
duty. He had been stationed on Augsburg 
Military Post since September 1951. 

Prize Winner 

Mrs. Ina Sevenen Shields, '51, was the 
winner of a 1952 Instructor Travel Contest. 
A teacher of grades five to six at the Ele- 
mentary School in Beltsville, Maryland, 
she wrote on the subject "Finland, the 
Admirable". The article described a trip 
taken during the preceding year. An- 
nouncement of the Award came from 
William B. Conklin, Travel Editor of the 
Instructor Magazine. 



From Mexico 

Four members of the Mexican Youth 
Fellowship Team — two students, a secre- 
tary and a kindergarten teacher — spoke in 
the Memorial Chapel recently. 

Margarita Marroquin, an English-Span- 
ish secretary in a North American firm 
in Mexico City; Pablo Gutierrez, a senior 
at Teachers' College in Coyoacan; Hector 
Gutierrez. Pablo's brother and a biology 
student at National University; and Lu- 
cero Real, a kindergarten teacher in Mex- 
ico City, composed the team. 

Their visit was sponsored by the Pres- 
byterian Church to interpret the life and 
progress of the Church in Mexico. 

Rev. and Mrs. H. Edwin Rosser, direc- 
tors of the Mexico City Student Center, 
accompanied the team. 

With Boys' Club 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, USMC 
(Ret.), Director of the University's Pub- 
lications and Publicity, has been re-ap- 
pointed Chairman of the Program Com- 
mit tee and member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Metropolitan Police Boys' 
Club. Washington, D. C. 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You Get So Much 
For So Little 

\/ PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 
\/ NIACIN for NERVES 

\/ CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

JANUARY 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

S. H. HARVEY, President 



E. S. McKEOWN 

PLUMBING & HEATING 

• CONTRACTING 

• REPAIRING 

• REMODELING 

• APPLIANCE 

Sales & Installation 
SMALL enough to want your work 
. . . and BIG enough to do it 

WArfield 7-7695 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



s 



ELLERS 

ALES & SERVICE 

Before you buy — see the new DeSoto 

oDeS^oto 
J lumouin 

6228 BALTIMORE AVE. 

RIVERDALE, MD. 

P. A. Sellers WArfield 7-6000 




College of 



Home Economics 

Mary Speake Humelsine 'jp 
Mrs. Joseph Longridge '2Q 



Old Grods Address New 

Several graduates returned to address 
Dean Mount's classes of freshmen and 
reported their activities since graduation. 

Charlotte Farnham Hasslinger is now 
a homemaker. She was formerly in hos- 
pital dietetics. Mrs. Ruth Talbert Fritz 
is also a homemaker. She told, however, 
of her previous work with the Potomac 
Electric Power Co. 

June Foster Mohler is with Mid-Atlan- 
tic Appliances, concerned with many ap- 
plications of home equipment. 

Edna Ann Chisolm Rohman, formerly 
working with fabrics at Woodward & Loth- 
rop is now a homemaker. 

Genevieve Poore spoke of her work in 
Textile Research with the Harris Asso- 
ciates Laboratories in Washington. 

Grace Rogers is Assistant Curator of 
Textiles at the Smithsonian Institute in 
Washington. Her work demands a con- 
stant keeping up on developments in the 
field of textiles. 

Shirley Mularkey is a Home Economist 
with Detergents, Inc., a new and growing 
industry. 

Alice Shepherd is assistant buyer of one 
area of wearing apparel at Woodward and 
Lothrop in Washington. This too is a 
kind of work which demands a wide 
scope of background. 

George Hopkins owns his own "Deco- 
rator Shop" in Lexington Park, Md. He 
recommended the importance in this sort 
of work of service and having the mer- 
chandise. 

Ann Ward is with Personnel Records 
with the Hot Shoppes. She was previously 
working as a food trainee and in food 
production. 

At Ohio State 

Marilyn Langford, 
who won the Women's 
Citizenship Prize 
upon graduation from 
Home Economics in 
'51, and was second 
among seven first hon- 
ors, received the Mas- 
ter of Science degree 
at Ohio State Univer- 
sity's fall quarter con- 
vocation last Deeem- 
Miss Langford ner. 

Graduates, February 1953 

Roberta Bafford, Crafts; Barbara 
Bright, General; Vivian Getz, Education; 
Lois Seal, Education; Ralph Tobiassen, 
Practical Art; Lillian Tragcseo, General; 
Rosemary Wilson, General. 

Personals 

Corinne Alster is working at Paul Lynn 
Heller Advertising Agency in Washington. 
So far she says she's done slides for TV, 
newspaper ads, direct mail cards and fold- 
ers. 

Joan Blakelock is working in the dis- 
play department at Kanns'. 

Dorothy Melvin Rose has a new daugh- 




ter bom in December, Marjorie Melvin 
Rose. 

Anne Darlington is assistant to Ann Mar 
at WMAR-TV in Baltimore. 

Fabric Festival 

The first Fabric Festival, held in the 
Maryland Room was a great success, pre- 
sented bj^ seniors majoring in Textiles 
and Clothing. 

It brought together news of the fab- 
rics on the current market, their best uses 
and care. There were opportunities to 
hear experts in textiles, to browse around 
the exhibits and enjoy the unending vari- 
ety of colors and textures in fabrics. 

Here was a chance to see why one skirt 
can be jumbled in a heap, sat on, prac- 
tically beaten and then very simply 
washed and hung to dry ready for wear 
without ironing. 

What about that greasy soup spilled 
down the front of a dress, or the beverage 
stain? Does that mean the dress is 
doomed for the dry cleaners? No indeed! 
There are inexpensive remedies for spots. 

For redheads, blondes, and brunettes, 
there was a demonstration on color selec- 
tion to help win that fraternity pin. 

What about those hard to iron places on 
that new dress? There was a special 
exhibit with tips for ironing darts, curves, 
and using the pressing mit, block and rolls. 

For those bagging skirts, there was a 
demonstration of the techniques for 
straightening them out. 

The Home Economics Alumni Board 
met at the home of Hilda Nystrom for 
supper and business. 





Grace Rogers 



Hazel Tuemmler 



Present were Carolyn Cappinger, Mary 
Humelsine, Mary Langford, Katharine 
Langridge, Dean Mount, Hilda Nystrom, 
and Hazel Tuemmler. 

Hazel Tuemmler re- 
ported on the tray 
and basket sales in 
which she said that 
there were not enough 
of the articles being 
sold and that some 
other method of dis- 
tribution should be 
worked out. 

It was decided to 
contact some of the 
alumni in various sec- 
tions of the state to 
ascertain if they 
would help promote sales. 

Mary Charlotte Chancy was asked to 
continue serving on the tray and basket 
committee. 

Danforth Fellowship '52 

By Marilyn Archer 

I wish everyone in Home Economics 
could have shared my wonderful experi- 




Mary Chaney 



ences as a recipient of the Danforth Sum- 
mer Fellowship. I spent four wonderful 
weeks gaining valuable information on all 
phases of Home Economics, and on a 
balanced way of life. 

This Fellowship award is sponsored by 
the Danforth Foundation and the Rals- 
ton Purina Company of St. Louis and is 
offered to Home Economic seniors — one 
from each state, plus Canada and Hawaii. 
The purpose of this four weeks summer 
Fellowship has been briefly stated by Mr. 
Wm. H. Danforth, president of the Rals- 
ton Purina Co. and the Danforth Founda- 
tion, as "to help students make decisions 
— to enlarge their horizons — to broaden 
their contacts — and to render guidance and 
assistance in attaining the Four-Fold way 
of living." 

In St. Louis 

Our first two weeks were spent in St. 
Louis under the guidance of Mr. Earl A. 
Sindecuse, or "Papa Sinde" as we called 
him. We toured department stores, the 
Ralston Purina Research Farm, a fur 
house, Merchants' Exchange, Barnes Hos- 
pital, an advertising agency, Swift Meat 
Packing Plant and many more. We also 
had many classes with guest speakers who 
were tops in their fields. These were very 
complete lectures on the fundamentals in 
nutrition, on commercial research pro- 
cedures, and on disease controls. On the 
lighter side, we attended the St. Louis 
Municipal Opera in Forest Park, visited 
the zoo, cheered for the St. Louis Cardi- 
nals, appeared on TV, ate all the candy 
we could hold at Mavrakas Candy Store, 
and filled ourselves with Italian food at 
Garavelli's Restaurant. We also had the 
experience of worshipping together in Mr. 
Danforth 's Chapels — once at Barnes Hos- 
pital and again on Sunday at a Congre- 
gational Church in St. Louis. 

The last two weeks were spent at camp 
Miniwanca, od the shores of Lake Michi- 
gan. Here emphasis was placed on the 
physical and religious side of life in com- 
plete contrast to the St. Louis days which 
stressed the social and mental develop- 
ment. At camp we slept in tents, bathed 
in Lake Michigan and quickly adapted 
ourselves to the great out doors. Our 
classes on such subjects as Ethics, The 
Bible and Its Idea of God, Balanced Four 
Fold Living, and Horizons. After classes 
we divided into teams for sports — baseball, 
volley ball, track meets, swimming meets, 
etc. Everyone participated regardless of 
ability. 

Each evening, we climbed the sand 
dunes overlooking Lake Michigan for ves- 
per service, planned so that services would 
be held as the sun was setting with its 
myriad reflections on the water. This 
period of worship was one of unforget- 
table beauty. 

Thanks to my Danforth Fellowship I 
now have friends in all states plus Canada 
and Hawaii. 



DEFINITIONS 

Jury: — A body of 12 men selected to dc- 
c'nli which side has the best lawyer. 

Patrol Wagon: — A one-way vehicle. 

Receiver: — One who minds other 
■people's business and gets paid for it. 

Shoestring: — The original capital of a 
self-made man. 



28] 




• Clean - Quiet- Odorless 

• Trouble-Free 

• Completely Automatic 

• No Periodic Servicing Needed 

• Gas Company Service 

• Budget Payment Plan 

. . . and users know 

the cost is low 

For complete information and 
a free estimate on gas home 
heating, call any 



Thaf's what I want — 



NATURAL 

GAS HEAT 

The comfort, convenience and satisfaction of having 
Natural Gas Heat is by no means reserved for the new 
home buyer. Natural Gas Heat can be installed in your 
present home easily . . . quickly . . . economically. If your 
present furnace is in good condition, a gas conversion 
burner is probably your answer. If you prefer to replace 
your furnace, you'll find the new, compact gas boilers 
and furnaces marvels of efficiency. Either way, you'll 
enjoy all of the advantages that only Natural Gas Heat 
can give. 




Gas Home Heating is recognized by banks and financial 

institutions as a HOME IMPROVEMENT. It can be 

-purchased with nothing down and 36 months 

to fay. The Gas & Electric Co., Baltimore. 

Gas Heating Contractor 



Any home is a better home with NATURAL GAS HEAT 



POOR, BO WEN., BARTLETT 
& KENNEDY, INC. 



POLICY ANALYSIS 

ENGINEERING SURVEYS 

APPRAISALS 



INSURANCE & BONDING 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY 



Phone: LExington 6004 



26 SOUTH CALVERT STREET 



BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND 



29 




East Coast 
Marketers Inc. 

Exclusive Sales Agents 

for 

SHORELAND FREEZERS, INC. 

TRAPPE FROZEN FOODS CORP. 

FROZEN FOODS 
P. O. Box 566 Salisbury, Md. 




SALISBURY 



CRISFIELD BERLIN 



£\ 


BRADLEY'S 


8 


HATCHERY 

Broiler Bred Chicks 

N. Aurora Street 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



"I 




Miss Hande 



guess I was a natural for it." 
That is the way Dorothy Hande, 
(P.E. '36). Executive Director of the Port 
Washington. X.Y.. Girl Scout Council de- 
scribes her interest in professional Girl 
Scouting. Although 
full-time jobs with the 
Girl Scouts may be a 
new concept to many 
people, for Dorothy 
and her more than 
1500 colleagues work- 
ing in the field it is a 
time-tested recipe for 
the college woman 
who wants a job 
which offers oppor- 
tunity for community 
service. 

A Girl Scout her- 
self as a youngster, 
she says she was "convinced that profes- 
sional Girl Scouting was the right job for 
me," by the professional workers she had 
known as a Senior Scout. "I had adored 
Scouting as a child and camping was the 
highlight of my life as a teenager. The 
adults who gave us so much of their time 
did such a fine job in making it an im- 
portant thing in our lives that four of the 
girls in our small Senior group chose pro- 
fessional Scouting as careers." 

Like the majority of her fellow workers 
Dorothy is one of the best advertisements 
the Girl Scouts have for their professional 
jobs. 

As the Executive Director of the Port 
Washington Council. Dorothy is respon- 
sible for giving guidance and direction in 
its jobs of recruiting, training and super- 
vision of troop leaders and committee 
members; securing financial support; pro- 
viding camping opportunities, planning co- 
operative projects with other youth serv- 
ice and civic groups in the community and 
interpreting the program to the public. 
Interest Increasing 
Although she is the only professional 
worker employed by the Council. Dorothy 
says she "enjoys this small Council set-up 
because there is real opportunity to know- 
both the girls and adults." 

Before joining the Port Washington 
Council staff Dorothy was the Executive 
Director of the Pasadena, Calif.. Council 
for four years. Previously she had served 
.is i Field Director for two years with the 
Indianapolis, Ind., Council and also had 
done field work with the Chicago, 111., 
Council while a graduate student at 
George Williams College. During the war 
she took a two year leave of absence to 
serve overseas with the Red Cross. 
Enjoys the Setup 
The growing demand for Scouting by 
girls in all parts of the country has made 
available many jobs similar to Dorothy's. 
As -he and many other professionals tes- 
tify a Girl Scout career can be one of the 
most challenging and personally rewarding 
available to the qualified woman. Connec- 



tions with a major national organization, 
which is in turn part of a world wide move- 
ment, provides rich opportunities for 
growth and advancement. Since there are 
openings in communities both large and 
small, rural and urban, all over the U.S.. 
the Girl Scout professional worker can 
choose the part of the country in which 
she wants to live and can transfer from one 
section to another without loss of job 
status. These jobs do not conflict with 
mairiage and homemaking. but for the 
single and adventurous minded woman 
there are some jobs involving travel. 

All applicants must have a bachelor's 
degree with emphasis in the social sciences, 
plus leadership and /or administrative ex- 
perience with groups. Camp staff experi- 
ence and graduate study in social group 
work are particularly desirable, 

In addition to the basic requirements an 
applicant should have a real concern for 
the welfare of others, regardless of race, 
creed or nationality and a sincere accept- 
ance of the Girl Scout code of ethics. She 
will need initiative, enthusiasm, patience, 
a sense of fun and a willingness to work 
hard. These high standards mean that the 
person who meets them can count on find- 
ing herself among congenial, competent 
and interesting colleagues. 

On Year-Round Basis 

Starting salaries for Executive Directors 
range from $3,000 to $6,000 according to 
the job responsibilities and the applicant's 
previous training and experience. The 
range for Field and District Directors is 
slightly less. Employment is on a year 
round basis with provision for one month's 
vacation and sick leave. Although working 
hours may be irregular, the total each week 
is usually kept to forty. In some cases the 
national organization gives fellowships for 
graduate study in the field. A period of 
in-service-training is provided to acquaint 
the newcomer with the organization's pur- 
pose, methods of work, etc. On-the-job 
training is given by members of the na- 
tional field staff. 

Local Councils Recommend 

Applicants who meet the qualifications 
are approved by the Personnel Depart- 
ment of Girl Scout National Headquarters 
and recommended for positions with local 
councils, each of which is responsible for 
the employment of its own staff. 

Maryland alumnae interested in learning 
more about the job opportunities in Girl 
Scouting are urged to write to the Per- 
sonnel Department, Girl Scouts of the 
U.S.A., 155 East 44th Street, New York 17, 
New York. 

In Alaska 

Richard J. DiPasquale, who attended 
Phys. Ed. '4 7- '50, has been promoted to 
corporal while serving at the Army's 
Alaska General Depot at Fort Richardson, 
one of the principal supply centers for 
U.S. Forces in the Alaska area. 



Orchid 

V. Norman Farrell. '49 BPA. writes, 
"Been wondering what's been missing in 
my life lately and finally decided it was 
my alumni magazine. Some scholar, some- 
where, some place, once indicated you 
don't recognize a good thing 'til it's too 
late." 



[30] 



School of 



Law 



— C. Kenneth Reiblich '29 

Annual Banquet 

The Annual Banquet of the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Law has 
been scheduled for Saturday Evening, May 
9. at 7:00 P.M. in the Emerson Hotel, 
Baltimore. Details of the program will be 
sent to all alumni by letter in the near 
future. 

Nominations 
The Nominating Committee, appointed 
by the President, Hon. C. Ferdinand Sy- 
bert, under the Chairmanship of Hon. 
John Grason Turnbull, has presented to 
the Secretary the following list of officers 
for the Alumni Association in the year 
1952-53, to be elected by ballot at the 
annual banquet. 

President — Edwin Harlan, Esq., 

'34, Baltimore 
1st V.P. —Hon. J. Dudley Digges, 

'36, Upper Marlboro 
2nd V.P. —J. Gilbert Prendergast, 

'33, Baltimore 
3rd V.P. —Hon. Stanford I. Hoff, 

'34, Westminster 
Sec.-Treas. — G. Kenneth Reiblich, 
Esq. '29, Baltimore 
Executive Committee: Miss Mary Ara- 
bian '44, Baltimore; Joseph Bernstein, 
Esq. '18, Baltimore; Hon. Joseph L. Car- 
ter '25 Baltimore; Godfrey Child, Esq. 
'17. Pocomoke City; Thomas B. Finan, 
Jr., Esq. '39, Cumberland; T. Hughlett 
Henry, Jr., '35, Easton; Hon. Dorothy T. 
Jackson '45, Towson ; Leon H. A. Pierson, 
Esq. '23, Baltimore; Benjamin B. Rosen- 
stock Esq. '25, Frederick; Hon. Allan W. 
Rhynhart '20, Baltimore. 

Members of the Nominating Committee 
in addition to Senator Turnbull were: Paid 
S. Berman, Esq. '22; Hon. Wm. S. James 
'37; Norman P. Ramsey, Esq.; and Hon. 
Charles C. Virts '40. Other nominees for 
the above offices to be eligible for the 
ballot must be presented by petition. 
signed by at least ten members of the 
association and filed with the Secretary, 
G. Kenneth Reiblich. School of Law. at 
least sixty days prior to the annual meet- 
ing. 

At Yale 
Irvin S. Brown '52 is one of 36 lawyers 
and law teachers from nine states and 
fifteen foreign countries to be named a 
Graduate Fellow of the Yale University 
Law School. He was a former faculty 
member of the Baltimore Junior College 
and will spend a year in residence study 
at Yale for an advanced law degree. 



WSF Donation 

Korea or India are the suggested recip- 
ients of Mandand's donation to the World 
Student Fund, according to Mary Jo Tur- 
ner, chairman. 

However, the final decision as to which 
will receive the fund will rest with national 
officials. The money amounts to 25 per- 
cent of the Campus Chest . 



L^uri/el ^hrciil Sutler 



y 




THE PERFECT GIFT' 



AVAILABLE IN 
AN ASSORTMENT 
OF 72 SETS 
FROM $8.50 
TO $134.50 




FINE CUTLERY 1 
by BriddelL 

Sold By Leading Stores 
Throughout The Country 



MADE BY BRIDDELL of CRISFIELD, MD. 

President, Chas. D. Briddell, Class of 1935 



Seed Cleaning 

Clover Seed 
Fertilizer • Lime 



HORACE M. MORGAN 

Queen Anne, Maryland 



Call us to purchase your 
Red Clover 

Phone-Hi llsboro 3891 



Reach for-- 




Concrete Septic Tanks 

EVERLASTING 

G. E. GILLESPIE & SON 

SUDLERSVILLE, MD. 



31 



School of 



Pharmacy 



B. Olive Cole 




Colonel Black Speaker 

At a meeting of the Student Branch of 
the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation of the University of Maryland's 
School of Pharmacy, the topic was "Pharm- 
acy Students. Pharmacists, and the Armed 
Forces." This subjecl 
was discussed by 
Colonel Robert L. 
Black. Chief of the 
Medical Service Corps, 
U.S.A. 

Colonel Black en- 
joyed dinner with a 
group consisting of 
faculty members and 
the officers of the stu- 
dent organization. The 
faculty members pres- 
Miss Cole ent included Dr. Ben- 

jamin F. Allen, Dr. 
George P. Hager and Dr. Frank J. Slama 
and the writer. The officers of the Student 
Branch included Burton J. Goldstein, pres- 
ident, C. Robert Welsh, vice-president, 
and Barbara Miller, secretary. 

Colonel Black, addressing an audience 
of over 125 persons which included mem- 
bers of the Baltimore Branch of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, the fac- 
ulty, students, and guests, discussed the 
topics of securing commissions, types of 
service performed, and the purposes of 
the Medical Service Corps which he com- 
mands. 

Everyone in attendance found Colonel 
Black's address most interesting and very 
enjoyable. 

The Student Branch of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association is very active 
in the School of Pharmacy, and it was a 
"red letter day" for them to have Colonel 
Black as a speaker. 

Jos. Cohen Elected 

Mr. Joseph Cohen, (Pharmacy '29), sales 
manager of Loewy Drug Company in Bal- 
timore, was elected executive secretary of 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, 
succeeding Dr. Melville Strasburger, retir- 
ing after ten years of service. 

Mr. Cohen resigned from Loewy Drug 



Company to assume his new full-time posi- 
tion and also became executive secretary 
of the Baltimore Retail Druggists Asso- 
ciation and the editor of the Maryland 
Pharmacist, official publication of both the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association and 
the Baltimore Retail Druggists Association. 

He has been active in association work 
for 20 years, and has served as a member 
of many important committees in the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association and 
the Baltimore Retail Druggists Associa- 
tion. He took a prominent part in the 
fund-raising campaign for the new Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association headquar- 
ters building, which will be dedicated in 
January. 

Among the posts held by Mr. Cohen are 
membership on the Civil Defense Advisory 
Committee for the State of Maryland and 
the General Alumni Council of the Univer- 
sity. He is a member of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association Membership 
Committee. 

From 1932 to 1946 Mr. Cohen was in 
the retail drug business, operating two suc- 
cessful stores. In 1946 he entered the 
wholesale drug field as general manager of 
a sundry wholesale house in Baltimore. 
Four years later he became sales manager 
of the Loewy Drug Company. 

Dr. Strasburger, the retiring secretary, 
was the first full-time secretary in the 
history of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association. A veteran of 40 years of ex- 
perience in the retail drug field, he was 
president of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association during 1936-1937. He became 
secretary of the Baltimore Retail Druggists 
Association in 1915. editor of the Maryland 
Pharmacist in 1939, and secretary of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association in 
1942~. 



Kelly Memorial Building 
The University's newest building — the 
KELLY MEMORIAL— was dedicated on 
January 16, 1953 in honor of Dr. Evander 
F. Kelly, (Pharm. '02) 

The main entrance of the handsome 
colonial style structure opens into the 
Memorial Room, which is flanked on either 
side by the Library and Conference Room. 
In the Memorial Room is a bronze bust 
of Dr. E. F. Kelly by Henry Beige and 
the Golden Book containing the names of 
all contributors to the Memorial Building. 
The Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy donated the bronze bust and the 



custom made furnishings. In the Library 
is a bronze plaque acknowledging gifts and 
contributions of the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. In the Conference Room 
is a bronze plaque representing the gift of 
the Trustees of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia. 

The various sub-divisions of the building 
are representative of the educational ac- 
complishments and professional phases of 
pharmaceutical practice and yet provide 
the practicalities that the profession re- 
quires for. successful operation. The library 
and building are available to the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land and the students and faculty thereof. 
The general meeting room and seminar 
rooms are available to the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of Maryland 
for the conduct of seminars, refresher 
courses and extraordinary meetings of 
faculty, student body, and sections and 
groups thereof. 

Dr. Dunning in Charge 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning was Chairman of 
the Committee in charge of the construc- 
tion of the Memorial. Dean Noel E. Foss 
was General Chairman of the Committee 
on Dedication, and presided at the exer- 
cises. The welcome was given by Manuel 
B. Wagner, President of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association. The invoca- 
tion was given by the Rev. Don Frank 
Fenn of the Church of St. Michael and 
All Angels, and the benediction by Rabbi 
Israel M. Goldman. Greetings were 
brought by Governor Theodore R. Mc- 
Keldin and by Dr. Huntington Williams 
for Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro. Jr. 

The following speakers commemorated 
Dr. Evander Frank Kelly: Dr. B. Olive 
Cole, Secretary of the Faculty, School of 
Pharmacy. University of Maryland; Dr. 
Robert P. Fischelis. Secretary of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association ; and 
Dr. Robert L. Swain, Editor of Drug 
Topics and Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees of the United States Pharmaco- 
poeia. 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning. General Chair- 
man, presented the Kelly Memorial Build- 
ing to the University of Maryland, and 
the acceptance speech was made by Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, President of the University 
of Maryland. 

Miss Margaret E. Beatty of the office 
staff of the School of Pharmacy was the 
organist. The professors of the School of 
Pharmacy and the members of the Student 
Branch of the American Pharmaceutical 



THE KELLY MEMORIAL BUILDING 

The Kelly Memorial Building is shown at the left, above. Picture at the right, above, shows the laying of the corner stone. Left to right: 
Joseph Cchen, Executive Secretary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association; Samuel I. Raichlen. President of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy; Dr. H. C. Byrd; Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, General Chairman of the Kelly Memorial; Manuel B. Wagner, President of the Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association; Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy; J. Milton Patterson of the Board of Regents; Frank Block, Presi- 
dent of the Baltimore Retail Druggists Association. 



\ 





AssociatioD acted as ushers for the oc- 
casion. 

Following the Cornerstone Laying by 
Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, those in attendance 
at the dedicatory exercises inspected the 
Memorial Building. 

The group attending the dedicatory 
exercises included members of the Board 
of Regents of the University of Maryland; 
members of the Council of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association; many Deans 
of the Schools of Pharmacy of the Nation; 
Deans of the Schools of the University of 
Maryland; officers of several State Phar- 
maceutical Associations; representatives of 
the United States Pharmacopoeia and of 
the National Formulary; members of the 
Armed Forces; as well as members of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association, Bal- 
timore Retail Druggists' Association, 
Alumni Association of the School of Phar- 
macy, Travelers' Auxiliary of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association. Baltimore 
Drug Exchange; practicing pharmacists of 
the State of Maryland. Independent and 
Chain Drug Stores, Wholesalers and Manu- 
facturers. 

Dr. Swain's Praise 

Lauding Dr. Kelly as "a writer, teacher, 
leader, counsellor, philosopher, idealist, 
realist, administrator, planner, inspirer and 
humanitarian — truly the embodiment of 
those innate virtues which endeared him 
to his profession and enshrined his memory 
in the hearts of those privileged to trudge 
by his side and have some part in the 
vast drama in which he was destined long 
to play the major role," Dr. Robt. L. 
Swain said. 

"While Dr. Kelly was one of pharmacy's 
most distinguished leaders, his real signifi- 
cance is found in those traits of character 
and achievements which go far deeper 
than the concept of mere leadership. 
Pharmacy has been blessed with many 
great leaders, but throughout its proud 
history, few men of Dr. Kelly's superb 
mental, spiritual and personal qualifica- 
tions have emerged." 

Dr. Kelly was continuously associated 
with the teaching of pharmacy, first as an 
assistant in the pharmacy laboratory in 
1903. as an associate professor in 1906, 
professor in 1917, Dean of the Faculty 
from 1918 to 1926 and then as Advisory 
Dean until his death. 

Great Organizer 

Dr. Kelly made himself not only a part 
of professional pharmacy, but also of or- 
ganized pharmacy. When he became Dean 
in 1918, following the First World War. 
there were only 52 students in the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy and 24 of these were 
graduated in 1919. In 1918 he was active 
in the group which succeeded in having 
the Student Army Training Corps made 
available to those students in the School 
of Pharmacy who were high school grad- 
uates. To meet this requirement, and with 
only scant funds, it was necessary to add 
two subjects to the curriculum — Physiology 
and Hygiene and Bacteriology. 

Dr. Kelly was very active in the group 
which worked for the amalgamation of 
the Baltimore professional schools of the 
University of Maryland with the Maryland 
State College to form the State University, 
which was accomplished through an act 
of the State Legislature in 1920. 



FASANKO MOTORS 

YOUR CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DEALER 




UNION 4-8700 



COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



THE FINEST VENETIAN BLINDS MADE 

• Removable Flexalum Slats • Plastic Tapes 



ORANGE 

Aluminum Casement 
Storm Windows 



Automatic 

VENETIAN BLIND 

LAUNDRY 

, n Any average 
69c . ' , .. , a 
size blind 




r enuE. 



UEHETlRn BLinD CO. 




6214 R. I. Ave., Riverdale 
Phone - UNion 4-1345 



AAcLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

Bladensburg, Maryland 




MARYLAND TELEPHONE 

Answering Secretarial Service 

218 Professional Building 

APPLETON 7-1500 

Hyattsville, Maryland 



HEATING WArfield 7-8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

6313 - 46th Ave. Riverdale, Md. 



PHONE TOWER 9-5100 



B. SUGRUE '34 



NORMAN M OTOR COMPANY 

SALES ^ ^ SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



[33; 




MILK IS BETTER 
In GLASS Bottles 

We did not invent SERVICE, but 
it has been proven in almost a Half 
Century of unequalled service to the 
industries using GLASS BOTTLES 
that we have set the pace in making 
it more than a word. 

Fast changing demands caused by 
weather, holidays sales campaigns, 
special products and the like necessi- 
tate a flexible and dependable supply 
of high quality bottles for dairymen, 
carbonated beverage bottlers and 
others. Here the BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY excels with its record 
of fast deliveries. 

INSIST ON YOUR MILK 
in GLASS Bottles 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort Ave. Cr Lawrence St. 

Baltimore 30, Md. 



DERAL 



SAVINGS & LOAN ASSN. 

'WHERE SAVINGS ARE SAFE' 

Insured up to $10,000.00 

5304 YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

Organized 1884 



College of- 




Dean Symons 



Agriculture 

Dr. Howard L. Stier '^2 



Dean Symons Honored 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons. who retired 
in 19.50 after 36 years of service to the 
University as director of the Maryland 
Extension Service, and was Dean of the 
College of Agriculture, who selected by 
Progressive Farmer, 
Southern farm maga- 
zine, as "Man of the 
Year in Service to 
Maryland Agricul- 
ture." The award was 
made in Maryland for 
the first time this year. 
Honoring Dr. Sy- 
mons in the Carolinas- 
Virginia edition of the 
publication The Pro- 
gressive Farmer said: 
"He championed 
practical and worth- 
while advances in agriculture, and during 
his administration, extension agents and 
offices were established in all 23 Maryland 
counties. He was a pioneer advocate of 
rural electrification and played a sterling 
role in the program that has carried elec- 
tricity to an overhwhelming portion of all 
Maryland's farms today." 

Dr. Symons, after whom Symons Hall at 
the University is named, is recognized in 
The Progressive Farmer, also, for his many 
contributions to Maryland agriculture oth- 
er than his work with the extension service : 
"He helped organize the Maryland Hor- 
ticultural Society and served as secretary 
from 1903 to 1918. The Maryland Agricul- 
tural Society was also one of his great in- 
terests, and he served as its secretary from 
1916 to 1922. Dr. Symons served as dean 
of agriculture at the University of Mary- 
land from 1947 to 1950." 

Previously, The Progressive Farmer. 
Carolinas-Virginia edition has presented a 
"Man of the Year" award to outstanding 
agriculturists in North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and Virginia, and beginning with 
Dr. Symons this year, the award will be 
given annually to a Maryland leader also. 
Dr. Symons, a man of action and ability, 
is, on the University's books, "retired." 
He is, however, Director of Public Rela- 
tions for the Suburban Trust Company's 
chain of Maryland banks. 

Praise from Kentucky 

A recent issue of "The Sheepmen," Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, a practical sheep publi- 
cation for flock owners, contained an article 
by H. C. Besuden, Kentucky breeder, re- 
flecting considerable credit on Maryland's 
sheep industry and individual leaders con- 
nected with it, particularly Frank R. Mc- 
Farland, Jr., assistant county agent, Balti- 
more County; Gordon Bautz of Luther- 
ville, and Professor Boyd Whittle of the 
University's animal husbandry department. 
The article is entitled "A New Rural Mary- 
land in McFarland Style." Mr. Bcsuden's 
material was gathered on a tour of inspec- 
tion of Maryland's flock owners. 

"Returning to the Bautz home," Mr. 
Besuden states, "I had a little while to re- 
view the day's program and prepare for the 



night one. I had noticed all day that a lot 
of women were on the tour, but McFarland 
said there would be many more that night, 
and he was right. This man McFarland 
has the knack of getting the wives inter- 
ested and then the men can't do anything 
about it. I have never visited in a nicer 
home than the Bautz's, and they certainly 
made my stay with them pleasant." 

"A demonstration was conducted by 
Boyd Whittle of the University," the ar- 
ticle went on to say, "and I think he con- 
ducted about the best going over of a sheep 
that I have ever witnessed. Being around 
Whittle awhile, you soon can whittle away 
all doubts as to his knowing what a sheep 
should be like." 

"I visualized in my mind's eye a new- 
day for rural Maryland," concluded the 
writer, with "no more waste or unused pas- 
ture land — her rolling acres transformed 
into usefulness, producing lambs, wool, and 
beef where once briars and weeds grew un- 
attended." 

Herdsman's Course 

More than 100 livestockmen. among 
them 15 women, attended the second an- 
nual Herdsman's Short Course. 

Feeding, breeding and management of 
beef, swine and sheep were taught in classes 
and practical work periods. 

Students came from 16 of Maryland's 
23 counties, plus Virginia, Pennsylvania 
and Connecticut. 

Maryland Land Week 

The week of July 27 will be Maryland 
Land Week. 

It has been the policy to have one area 
of the State highlight the observance each 
year. This year it will be Area 2. Upper 
Eastern Shore: Kent. Queen Anne's, Cecil, 
Caroline, and Talbot counties. The com- 
mittee defined other areas as follows: 

Area 1. Lower Eastern Shore: Dorches- 
ter, Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester 
counties. 

Area 3. Southern Maryland : Prince 
Georges, St. Mary's, Calvert. Charles and 
Anne Arundel counties. 

Area 4. Central Maryland: Harford, Bal- 
timore. Howard, Carroll, Frederick, and 
Montgomery counties. 

Area 5. Western Maryland: Garrett, Al- 
legany, and Washington counties. 

The areas were chosen because of similar 
types of agriculture in the counties. Under 
this plan any individual area, when high- 
lighting Land Week, will be able to select 
the date most suitable for the type of 
farming within the area. 

New officers were elected at the meet- 
ing as follows: Edward Holter. member of 
Maryland's Board of Regents and Master 
of the State Grange, was re-elected chair- 
man of the committee. Carl Feucht, Sr., 
Elkton. was elected Vice-Chairman, and 
Professor Charles P. Ellington (Soil Con- 
servation) of the University was elected 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

In Canal Zone 

First Lt. Harold E. Durst. (Agr. '49) who 
entered the Army in '49, is serving at Fort 
Kobbe, Canal Zone, with the 33d Infantry 
Regiment. 

Assigned to Tank Company, he also has 
been active in off-duty sports, including 
football, playing end on the regimental 
football team. 



34 



"Outstanding Teacher" 
Dr. Morley A. .lull. Head of the Poultry 

Department, received a citation as the 
"outstanding poultry teacher of the year" 
and a $100 check at I lie annual meeting of 
the Poultry Science Association. Students 
and Alumni will recall that Dr. Jull was 
one of four faculty members in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture who were honored in 
1950 for "excellence in teaching". 

At Ohio State 

Clarence B. Melton. Agri. '51, was 
awarded a Master of Science degree at 
Ohio State's fall quarter convocation last 
December. 

New Regulation 

A new regulation of the Maryland State 
Board of Agriculture prohibits feeding 
raw garbage to swine, in order to prevent 
transmission of diseases to animals or man. 
The regulation is to be enforced by the 
Livestock Sanitary Service and calls for 
persons feeding garbage to swine to secure 
a permit from the State Board of Agri- 
culture. The permits must be renewed 
yearly. The regulation does not apply to 
farmers feeding their own household gar- 
bage to pigs raised for their own use. In 
anas where feeding of garbage is pro- 
hibited by local regulations, no permits 
will be issued. 

Be Reody for Fire 

It is amazing that so few farms have fire 
extinguishers, states A. V. Krewatch, Ex- 
tension Agricultural Engineer at the Uni- 
versity. 

Seldom, he says, does he see fire fight- 
ing equipment in homes or barns. Al- 
though extinguishers may not entirely put 
out the fire, they often can keep a fire in 
check until the fire department arrives. 

Rowland Hyde 

The Combat Infantryman Badge for 
excellent performance of duty under enemy 
fire in Korea has been awarded to Cpl. 
Rowland Hyde, (Ag. '51). 

He is an assistant squad leader in the 
2d Infantry Division, which captured 
"Heartbreak Ridge" in October 1951 and 
took "Old Baldy" last July. 

Corporal Hyde entered the Army in 
July 1951 and joined the 2d in October 
1952. 

He was a member of the University's 
boxing team and fought his bout to a 
draw against Michigan State in the New 
Orleans Sugar Bowl, '48. 

Roger Cohill 

Roger Cohill, '47, has just been named 
Sales Manager of the Insecticide Division 
of the Miller, Chemical, and Fertilizer in 
Baltimore. Roger is now serving his 
second term on the Agricultural Alumni 
Board and is remembered at Maryland for 
his unusual activity as Vice-President of 
the Inter-Fraternity Council, President of 
the Student-Government Association, 
President of Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, 
and a member of O.D.K. and Alpha Zeta 
honorary fraternities. Raised in Hancock, 
Maryland, he was associated with his 
famous Dad, J. Andrew Cohill, in the fruit 
business. With the Miller-Corporation, he 
has served as entomologist and Assistant 
Sales Manager prior to the new appoint- 
ment. 



Cooperating with the 

Department of Agriculture 



of the 



University of Maryland 



FOUR STATES LIVESTOCK, INC. 



Hagerstown, Maryland 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest and Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative. 

Feeds • Seeds • Fertilizer 

Limestone 

Petroleum Products 

Frederick 1077-277-1 177 

Thurmont 3111 

Middletown No. 6 

Main Office 

25 E. SOUTH STREET 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



T. EDGIE RUSSELL 



General Contractor 



FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

* Established 7859 * 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 
Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Frederick 1820-1821-2000 

Bockeystown 3511 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone FREDERICK 1034 
FREDERICK, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
110W. Patrick St. • Frederick, Md. 



EBERT'S 

Famous 
ICE CREAM 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



35 




T 
A 
N 
K 

S 
E 
R 
V 
I 

C 
E 



EASTMAN 
DUPONT 
ANSCO 
CHEMICALS 

Distributors of 



ALBERT X-RAY SOLUTIONS 

1024 CATHEDRAL ST. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Phone: LExington 6026 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LE. 29 1 2 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
I 822 Eye St., N.W. NA 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 

TERRAZZO 
TILE MARBLE SLATE 

A. F. Pizza 

PL. 3554 911 E. Pratt St. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md. 



School of- 



Medicine 

^^^=^^^=^^ Dr. John Wagner 'j8 
New Psychiatry Course 

A series of inservice training programs 
in mental health for Maryland pub- 
lic health nurses began in January at the 
Psychiatric Institute under the joint aus- 
pices of the Maryland State Department 
of Health and the Department of Psy- 
chiatry of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. 

The course is under the direction of Dr. 
Maurice H. Greenhill, associate professor 
of psychiatry at the university, and Miss 
Florence Burnett, R.N., public health nurs- 
ing consultant in mental hygiene, Division 
of Public Health Nursing of the State 
Health Department, and part-time re- 
search assistant at the School of Medicine. 

In North Carolina 

Dr. Greenhill and Miss Burnett worked 
on a similar program in North Carolina. 

Designed as a two-year project, the in- 
service training program for public health 
nurses is an approach to the teaching of 
mental health principles as they apply to 
everyday problems in public health. 

Instruction is patient-centered and with 
a minimum of didactic teaching. 

The program's dual purpose; Education 
and research in teaching methods. 

Educationally, it is designed to increase 
the public health nurses' understanding of 
human behavior and to enable them to 
apply what they have learned in establish- 
ing more productive nurse-patient-family 
relationships in their daily work. 

"Public health nurses," Miss Burnett 
says, "can play an increasingly more sig- 
nificant role in the developing movement 
to incorporate mental health in general 
public health practice." 

Their access to the family and their 
many contacts in rural and urban com- 
munities place them in a unique position 
for the promotion of health, for preventive 
practice, for casefinding, and referral for 
early treatment of those who have emo- 
tional problems. 

"Usually in general nursing training and 
in specialized public health education, 
nurses have not been adequately prepared 
to understand the mental health aspects of 
community nursing or the role of social 
and emotional factors in disease. Inservice 
educational programs are designed to give 
public health nurses additional training in 
this field." 

Public Health Nurses 

Each group enrolled in the program will 
include five public health nurses from three 
participating counties and one nurse from 
the faculty or graduate clinical teaching 
staff of the School of Nursing, University 
of Maryland, and the University Hospital. 

Under the leadership of staff members of 
the Psychiatric Institute, nursing group 
discussions will center around technics of 
interviewing, dynamics of human behavior, 
interpersonal relationships with emphasis 
on the interaction between the nurses and 
the patients, and some comprehensive con- 
cepts of nursing. 



Research in teaching methods will be 
part of the project. 

Active at 80 

Commemorating the 80th birthday of 
Dr. Chas. R. Foutz (M.D. '99), Robert L. 
McDowell wrote in the Baltimore Sun 
from Westminster: — "Carroll county's 
dean of practicing physicians celebrated 
his eightieth birthday by taking a little 
time off from his usual medical duties to 
watch inauguration festivities in Washing- 
ton on the television. 

"It was just about the only concession 
made for the occasion, until the evening 
hours when scores of friends, medical and 
business associates and townspeople paid 
tribute to the physician. 

"Dr. Foutz is believed to be the oldest 
active practitioner, from the point of view 
of service, in the State. He has ministered 
to the medical needs of Carroll countians 
from his home for 55 years. He was born 
on the farm in Uniontown on January 20, 
1873. 

"In 1900, he married Carrie E. Brown, 
who died in 1936. He has four children: 
Charles R. Foutz, Jr., Mrs. G. Russell 
Benson, Mrs. Paul Lawyer, and Mrs. Harry 
Monroe. There are also ten grandchildren. 

"Dr. Foutz has ministered to several 
generations in many Westminster families, 
and is credited with bringing thousands 
of babies into the world. 

"Aside from his medical practice, the 
doctor has always been keenly interested 
in his community, its needs and its growth. 

"And in a town which is not without 
its share of venerable personages, he is 
noted for his energy and his zest and 
enthusiasm for living which have endeared 
him to old and young in all walks of life. 

Many Organizations 

"He is a member of the Grace Lutheran 
Church, a past master of the Door to 
Virtue Lodge No. 46, A.F. & A.M.; a 
member of the Shriners and a Knight 
Templar of Baltimore ; a life member of 
Charity Lodge, Knights of Pythias; a 
life member of the Friends of Carroll Post 
No. 31, American Legion; a life member 
of Molleville Post No. 407, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. 

"Also, an honorary member of the West- 
minster Fire Department; a member of 
the Westminster Riding Club; a member 
of the Carroll County Medical Association ; 
a member of the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland; a member of the 
Army Advisory Committee of the 2nd 
Army, and a member of the board of 
trustees of the Maryland General Hospital. 

"His business interests include : president 
of the Westminster Hardware Company; 
vice president of the LTnion National Bank, 
and — in service — the oldest director of the 
bank; a director of the newspaper The 
Democratic Advocate, and a director of 
the Carroll County Mutual Fire Company. 

"As one of his closest admirers and long- 
time friends put it : 'He has not only been 
a physician to his people over this half 
century, but he has shared their sorrows 
and their happiness, and has been a loyal 
confidant to many. 

" 'His eightieth birthday will be shared 
in spirit by man}' of us all over Carroll 
county.' " 

In Chicago 

The first annual clinical meeting of the 



[36] 



American Academy of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology was held in Chicago recently. 

Dr. Louis H. Douglass, Professor of 
Obstetrics of the University of Maryland 
icad one of the outstanding papers of the 
entire session, which was attended by 
over 1200 of the most prominent gynecolo- 
gists in the United States. His subject 
was "Cerebral Arhythmia and its relation- 
ship to Pregnancy Toxemia." 

Dr. John E. Savage. Assistant Professor 
of Obstetrics, of the University of Mary- 
land, was also in attendance and led a 
round table meeting. 

In Oneida County, N. Y. 

Dr. Herman J. Habercr '06 of Utica, 
New York has a unique record of success 
in elections. He was first appointed 
coroner of Oneida County by Governor 
Dix in 1911. He was reappointed in 1913 
by Governor Sulzer. Since 1919 he has 
been elected every time he has run for 
the office, making a total of eleven plus 
the two terms to which he was appointed. 

Medical TV Program 

The University of Maryland weekly TY 
Program "Live and Help Live" originat- 
ing with WBAL-TY Baltimore is enter- 
ing its second year. It has been a tre- 
mendous success and is more fully de- 
scribed on page 10. 

No subjeel of interest to the individual 
or the public is taboo. Diseases of the 
sex glands and tract are presented along 
with others and are received with appro- 
priate regard. Occasionally topics have 
been discussed at the peak of their local 
interest, notably that of ringworm of the 
scalp which reached epidemic proportions 
in Baltimore in 1952. Following the tele- 
cast clinics w T ere flooded with persons seek- 
ing diagnosis and treatment. 

The greatest interest, however, as re- 
flected by viewer reaction was in the pres- 
entation and demonstration of the less 
spectacular things, namely techniques, op- 
erations, diagnostic tests and research pro- 
cedures. These were performed on location 
and explained to the audience in simple 
language. By these procedures the view- 
ing public apparently got the feel of being 
part of a great and interesting community 
and began to realize the part each must 
play in community life if the programs 
for better health and sanitation, better 
hospital care and research facilities are to 
lie a reality. 

Programs of the future are planned to 
eliminate the blunders made (and there 
were many), and to strengthen the pres- 
ent type of program content. 



AEC in Seattle 

The Atomic Energy Commission has ex- 
panded its graduate fellowship program in 
radiological physics by adding a West 
Coast training location. Two others 
already are in operation. 

The University of Washington at Seattle 
and the AEC's Hanford Operations Office 
will jointly conduct the new program for 
the 1953-54 school year. 

Programs will be continued at Vander- 
bilt University, Nashville, in cooperation 
with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and 
at the University of Rochester in coopera- 
tion with the Brookhavcn National Lab- 
oratorv on Long Island. 



£ 



errapin 



or 



ye Q 



Wei 



rs 



iQv e 



ond 



yec 



^ 



"--.£***» 



C % 



G 



se/y 



folly 



"-of... ' 9e$f b 



o/?tV 



O/l 



■ice. 



C °mf t 



this. 



o/ e/ 



,n flo/f 



u, *ni 



°/-A 



*Oc/ 



°b/ e 



"*>o, 



r e C( 



ro 



B ok 



9o Qc / 



e m/ } 



y,th 



'mo 



req 



r eth 
th ( 



' 5 °nf t 



e 'i-h< 



or, 






e y'v e 



Su Pe rb 



'orf 



D, 



*o 



nd. 



,C "-'er s * 0/ * 



ffull 



'>-<% 



*'e. 



nt 






mng e 



[ o#o 




§ 5 



§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
| 
S 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
f 
§ 
§ 
§ 



THE 

J. W. BUFFINGTON 

COMPANY 



WHOLESALE FOODS 



Established 1880 

Phone VErnon 4050 

1000-02 HILLEN ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 






37 



HOTEL \jZ 
HEDIN HOUSE 



WASHINGTON'S NEW, COMPLETELY 
AIR CONDITIONED HOTEL 

Just three miles from the 
University of Maryland 

Make the Hedin House your Home 
away from home 

For the Finest in Food and Drink 
head for the Hedin House 

PLANET ROOM 

Dining Room - Cocktail Lounge 

Private dining room available for 

weddings, anniversaries, special 

parties, business meetings 

Phone ADams 4-6060 

HOTEL HEDIN HOUSE 

One block inside the District 
2902 Newton St., N.E. (at R. I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 



F 



III 



COMPANY, 
INC. 



Masonry Contractors 
Glass Block A Specialty 



5609 FIRST STREET. N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 
RANDOLPH 6-0078 



a. him; sons 

COMPANY 
Nurseries 

Over 500 Acres 
ROCKVILLE, MD. 

Office & Landscape Dept. 

1318 EYE STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Phone: NAtional 8-6880 





USloiiotn j-^arade 



Chapel Bells Initiated as Wedding Bells 
for Balmer-Foster Nuptials 

Although it was the second wedding in 
Maryland's Memorial Chapel, the 
wedding of Diane Adele Foster to Lieu- 
tenant John M. Balmer, USAF was the 
first wedding for which the chapel chimes 
became wedding chimes. The bride, a 
senior, is vice president of the women's 
league. Mortar board, student religious 
council and the Westminster club, and for- 
merly was president of Alpha Gamma 
Delta sorority. Her grandfather, the late 
T. J. Foster, was founder of the Inter- 
national Correspondence schools. The 
groom, now stationed in Oklahoma, is 
a member of Phi Kappa Tau. 

Baer — Grogon 
Florence Estelle Grogan to John C. 
Baer, Maryland Student. 

Bradford — Skinner 

Barbara Ann Skinner, Maryland alumna, 
President of Alpha Delta Pi, to Dudley 
M. Bradford. t T niversity of Illinois. 

Chamberlain — Dees 

Mary Ann Dees. Nursing '38. to Dr. E. 
C. Chamberlain. 

Chappelear — Amory 

Both Maryland seniors, Shirley Mae 
Amory. daughter of Colonel and Mrs. 
Harold L Amory of Walter Reed Medical 
Center, to George H. Chappelear, Jr. 

Chisholm — Fabiszak 

Robert S. Chisholm. D.D.S., '52 to An- 
toinette Fabiszak. 

Cohn — Waters 

Jean Gloria Waters. Nursing '48. to Dr. 
Jerome E. Cohn. 

Colburn — Donovan 

Virginia Donovan to Raymond Colburn, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Cox — Fellenz 

Vivian Fellenz. Winona. Minnesota, to 
Walter C. Cox, Maryland alumnus. 

Crowley — Sheeley 

Finest J. Crowley. D.D.S., '51 to Ethel 
Sheeley in Baltimore. 

Davis — Day 

Virginia Mae Day to Lieut. Kenneth R. 
Davis, U/SAF, Maryland alumnus. 

Durney — Porter 

Lillie F. Porter, Nursing '51, to Thomas 
E. Durney. 

Ecker — Brown 

Margaret Jean Brown to Charles I. 



Ecker, Maryland alumnus, now a physical 
education instructor at Tanevtown High 
School. 

Emmitt — Christopher 

P Frances Marion Christopher to Harry 
F. Emmitt, Maryland alumnus, now asso- 
ciated with Physar Drugs of New York. 

Fargo son — Lloyd 
Doris G. Lloyd. Nursing '26, to Lt. J. C. 
Fargason. 

Folk — Mansfield 

Katherine Ann Mansfield, Maryland 
/ alumna, to John W. Folk, George Wash- 
ington. 

Giller — Zee 

j Bessie Marie Parks Zee, Nursing '40, to 
Edward A. Giller. 

Hamilton — Horst 

Janet Ann Horst to Second Lieut. John 
T. Hamilton, L T SAF, Maryland alumnus. 

Harmon — Worischek 

Anne Lucille Worischek to George G. 
Harman, Maryland Graduate student. 
Both are V. P. I. graduates. 

Hein — Skolnick 

Estelle Skolnick, Maryland alumna, Phi 
Sigma Sigma, to Joseph E. Hein. 

Hollo way — Berkley 

Donna Jean Berkley to James D. Hollo- 
way, 2nd, senior at Maryland. Delta Tau 
Delta. 

Jacobsen — Kearney 

Both Maryland graduates, Ruth Joan 
Kearney, Kappa Kappa Gamma and Phi 
Delta Epsilon, to Hugh N. Jacobsen, 
Sigma Chi, graduate student at Yale's 
School of Architecture. 

Kaiser — Jones 

Jeanette Jones to Carl Kaiser, Phar- 
macy alumnus, now a graduate assistant of 
pharmaceutical chemistry at Maryland 
College of Pharmacy. 

Korpa — Berman 
Helen Lois Berman, Ohio University, to 
Morton Kappa, Maryland alumnus. 

Kehoe — Downey 

Adelia Joan Downey, Maryland alumna, 
to Daniel J. Kehoe. 

Krewatch — Robertson 

Gloria Christine Robertson, Chouinard 
Art Institute, Los Angeles, to PFC Ken- 
neth K. Krewatch. U.S.A., Maryland 
alumnus, son of Professor Albert V. Kre- 
watch, Agriculture Engineering, Maryland. 



LaBar — Goeller 

Edgar M. LaBar, Jr., D.D.S. 
Frances Joanne Goeller. 



'52 to 



[38] 



Lancaster — Roe 
Maillia Gillespie Roe, Maryland alum- 
na, to Henry ('. Lancaster, Jr., Virginia 
alumnus. 

Lang don — Smith 

Esther Lorraine Smith to John X. Lang- 
don, Maryland student. 

Longc — Norrie 
Helen Ruth Norrie to Glenn R. Langc, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Lavelle — Lynch 
John J. Lavelle, 1 >.!>.>.. '52 to Eliza- 
beth Lynch in Wilmington, Del., on Sep- 

Lee — Sliney 

Phyllis Alice Sliney. Nursing '46. to Dr. 
Robert E. Lee. They were married iu 
Livorno, Italy, 
tember 27. 

Lombardi — Cullen 

Angelo R. Lombardi, D.D.S.. '47 to Vir- 
ginia Cullen in Boonton, X. J., on July 5. 

Mason — Hill 

Betty Imogene Hill to Pfc. Donald F. 
Mason, I'SA. Maryland alumnus. 



Mc Daniel — Hudgins 

Doris Jean Hudgins, Nursing 
Thomas McDanicl. 



'51. to 



McHugh — Calcagnini 

Joan Inez Caleagnini, Penn Hall and 
Finch Junior College, to Walter P. Mc- 
Hugh. Maryland alumnus. World War II 
Marine Corps Veteran. 

Messer — Hipp 

Richard J. Messer, D.D.8.. '52 to Bar- 
bara Hip]'. 

Mickey — Pelleschi 

At San Juan. Puerto Rico. Rose Marie 
Pelleschi. St. Johns Nursing School of 
New York, to William E. Mickey, Jr., 
Maryland alumnus. 

Miller — Aiken 

Nancy Baird Aiken. Pi Beta Phi, to 
Charles H. Miller. Kappa Alpha, both 
Maryland alumni. 

Nichols — Gasser 

Martha Helen Gasser, Nursing '48, to 
James P. Nichols. 

Noya — Giordano 

Marie Dolores Giordano to Joseph J. 
Noya, Maryland School of Medicine stu- 
dent. 

Parulis — Reeder 

Both Maryland alumni. Charlotte Anne 
Reeder. Alpha Delta Pi. to Adolph J. 
Parulis, Phi Kappa Tau. 

Pearson — Cape hart 
Patricia Louise Capehart, daughter of 
Indiana's Senator and Mrs. Capehart, to 
James C. Pearson, both Maryland alumni. 

Polites — Morrette 

Doris Jeanne Morrette. Maryland 
alumna, Sigma Kappa, to 2nd Lt. William 
C. Polites, I'SMC. 

Pyle — Richardson 
Mozelle Richardson, member of faculty, 
Bel Air High, to Kenneth (i. Pyle. Mary- 
land senior. 

Robinson — Johnson 

Rosalie Johnson. Maryland alumna, to 
James S. Robmson. Maryland senior. 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

SANDE WILLIAMS and his or- 
chestra offer music that is an in- 
vitation to dance. Dinner from 
6; dancing from 9:30 p.m. 

Blue Room 

BARNEE conducts the famed 
Barnee-Lowee Orchestra for your 
dancing pleasure. Dining from 
7 p.m. Floor show nightly 10 p.m. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CALVERT 



Reservations: ADoms 4-C700 






The George Hyman 
Construction Co. 






ENGINEERS 


& 






CONTRACTORS 










1010 VER/ 
WASH 


AONT AVE., N.W. 
INGTON, D. C. 







Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

LOgan 

7-8455 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 

TOP SOIL ROAD GRAVEL 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

LOgan 

7-8448 








WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 







[39] 



SCHWARTZ 

POULTRY CO. 




purveyors to: 

• hotels 

• restaurants 

• institutions 

hanoverandcamdensts. 

baltimore, md. 
SAratoga 1942-1943 



HENDLERS 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Almost 50 Years 




"Baltimore's 
Favorite Dessert" 

PEabody 2600 
2318 Belair Rd. Baltimore 13 



Pictures Framed 

We specialize in framing Diplomas 
inexpensively 

DOELLER & DRAISEY 

1218 Northview Rd., Baltimore 
By appointment — HOpkins 3792 



Royal — Bishop 

Loraine Bishop, Gay, North Carolina, 
graduate of Memorial Mission Hospital 
School of Nursing and Asheville Biltmore 
College, to Doyle Royal, Maryland grad- 
uate and Assistant Dean of Men at Mary- 
land. The groom, an Army Captain in 
World War II, was one of Maryland's 
outstanding tennis stars and now coaches 
both the tennis and soccer teams. 

Rubenstein — Zinder 

Both Maryland graduates, Ruth Anne 
Zinder, President of Alpha Epsilon Phi, to 
Stanley E. Rubenstein, Tau Epsilon Phi, 
President, Student Government Associa- 
tion, Navy veteran. 

Ryan — Wheeler 

Ann Margaret Wheeler, Tri-Delt and 
D. A. R., to Lieut. Paul A. Ryan, USAF 
reserve, World War II veteran, and Alpha 
Tau Omega, both Maryland alumni. 

Schock — Potts 

Betty Joan Potts, Maryland alumna, to 
Joseph P. Schock, Marquette. 

Shwartz — Pasman 

Rita Pasman to Charles Shwartz, Phar- 
macy student. They were married on TV 
program "Bride and Groom." 

Sengstock — Knighton 

Miriam Janis Knighton to Capt. Charles 
H. Seng-stack. 3rd, USAF, Maryland stu- 
dent. 

Stewart — Marks 

Both Maryland alumni, Patricia Eileen 
Marks, to Merrick W. Stewart. 

Tongue — Enlow 

Raymond K. Tongue, D.D.S., '43 to Bar- 
bara Enlow. 

Tup man — Hanson 

Florence Marguerite Hanson, Maryland 
alumna, to Wilbur C. Tupman, Georgia 
Tech and George Washington. World War 
II Navy veteran. 

Walsh — Kendall 

Joan Alden Kendall, Maryland alumna, 
to Ensign Ambrose M. Walsh, USN, USS 
New Jersey. 

Worner — Hartley 

Ruth Marion Hartley, Maryland alum- 
na, to William C. Warner, George Wash- 
ington. 

Warren — Dolan 

Virginia Clare Dolan, Our Lady of Cin- 
cinnati, Beth Gamma Phi, to William E. 
Warren, Maryland alumnus. 

Wedemeyer — Davenport 

Dorothy Edna Davenport. Maryland 
alumna, to Capt. Albert D. Wedemeyer, 
USA, veteran of European Theatre and 
Korea. 

West — Sondelmann 
Anita Christiane Sandelmann, Maryland 
senior, to Charles V. West, U. S. Army, 
Ft. Devins, Mass. 

Westerfield — Schellhas 

Charlotte E. Schellhas to Edwin E. Wes- 
terfield, both Maryland alumni. 

Woolley — Righter 

Jane Stuart Righter, Wilson Teachers, 
to Charles Woolley. Maryland alumnus. 



Wolmon Laurent i 

At Houston. Texas, Mary Louise Laur- 
entz to 1st Lieutenant Benjamin R. Wol- 
man, LJSAF. Maryland graduate recentry 
returned from Korea. At College Park 
Lieutenant Wolman was, for two years, 
manager of the varsity boxing team. 




B 



Albert — Sandler 

arbara Albert to Sergeant Robert E. 
Sandler, USAF, Maryland alumnus. 

Allen — Dixon 

Nancy Jean Allen. Maryland student. 
Alpha Chi Omega, to Airman Richard M. 
Dixon. USAF. Maryland alumnus. 

Averman — Deakin 

Mary Jane Averman, Maryland gradu- 
ate, Kappa Kappa Gamma, to John H. 
Deakin, Carnegie Tech, Phi Kappa, over- 
seas World War II veteran. 

Bohmer — Fitzgerald 

Kathryn Jane Bahmer to Pvt. Donald L. 
Fitzgerald former Maryland student. 

Bailey — Remson 

Sallie Bailey. Holton-Arms, Sweet Briar 
and Mt. Vernon, to Ellsworth J. Remson, 
Jr., Maryland graduate. 

Baker — Mount 

Both Maryland alumni, Sandra Lee Bak- 
er, Delta Gamma, to Stuart W. Mount, 
Sigma Chi. 

BoroH — Seidel 

Barbara Jewell Baroff to Alvin M. Seidel. 
both Maryland students. 

Behner — Coon 

Marilyn Jean Behner to Harold E. Coon, 
former Maryland student. 

Blizzard — Heaps 

Both Maryland graduates, Jane Crea 
Blizzard, Gamma Phi Beta, to Emory 
A. Heaps, one of Delta Tau Delta's found- 
ers, World War II and Korea Navy Lieu- 
tenant. 

Boyer — Schumack 

Eleanor D. Boyer, Maryland alumna, to 
Paul R. Schumack. 

Boynton — Randall 

Evelyn Louise Boynton. Bryn Mawr 
alumna, now at Hollins College, to Ed- 
ward O. Randall, Jr.. Maryland alumnus. 

Cohen — Feldstein 

Lois Ann Cohen to Lee M. Feldstein, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Cole — Swensen 

Patricia Dudley Cole. Maryland alumna, 
to Lieutenant Charles Swensen. USA, Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Cooksey — Thompson 

Viola Montez Cooksey. American Uni- 
versity alumna, to David G. Thompson, 
Maryland alumnus and present graduate 
student. 

Culbertson — Jones 

Bettsy Maria Culbertson, Chi Omega, 
Maryland senior, of Mexico City, to John 
L. Jones. M. I. T. senior, Beta Theta Pi. 
former Navy Midshipman. 



40 



Daniel — Akers 

Jean Ellen Daniel. George Washington, 
to Sheldon B. Akers. Theta Chi and Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa Maryland HS and MS. 

Davies — Bucher 
Franco Eileen Davies to James K. 
Bucher, both Maryland alumni. 

Densford — Knight 

Claire Densford, Maryland, Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma, graduate of Holton-Arms Jun- 
ior College, to Maryland graduate Lieut. 
Curtis H. Knight of Fort Myer. The 
bride-to-be is the daughter of Comdr. and 
Mrs. Robert L. Densford, U. S. Navy. 

DiCicco — Covey 

Claire Anne DiCicco, Marjorie Webster, 
to Kevin E. Cavey, Maryland graduate. 

Dodson — Allen 

Both Maryland seniors. Joan Dodson, 
Alpha Omicron Phi, to S. Paul Allen, 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

Elk on Wertheimer 

Catherine Elkan. Maryland Junior, to 
Lieut. Arnold F. Wertheimer, USAF, 

Pittsburgh alumnus. 

E It ring — Warren 
Mary Ann Eltring, Maryland senior, 
president of Gamma Phi Beta and a mem- 
ber of Omicron Nu Home Ec honorary, to 
Allen M. Warren, Theta Tau, Engineering 
senior at Virginia. 

Fein berg Heifer 

Carol Snodra Feinberg to Donald Heifer, 
Tau Epsilon Phi, both Maryland alumni. 

Ferguson — Bien 

Both Maryland alumni, Jean Hook Fer- 
guson. Alpha Omicron Pi, to J. Irvin Bien. 

Fields— Schiff 

Marilyn Fields, Maryland senior, Alpha 
Epsilon Phi, to Peter H. Schiff, Columbia 
graduate now at Harvard Law School. 

Friedman — Tomkins 

Lois Ruth Friedman, Maryland, Phi Sig- 
ma Sigma, to Frederic D. Tomkins. 

Golden — Mulitz 

Dorothy Lita Golden, Duke graduate, to 
Earl Mulitz. Maryland alumnus. 

Goodwin — Krouse 

Ethel Charlotte Goodwin. Maryland sen- 
ior, to Lieut, jg. Philip C. Krouse, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Grennell — Roiston 
Both Maryland graduates, .Shirley Mar- 
garet Grennell, graduate student, to 
Charles H. Roiston. 

Gross — Gildenhorn 

Alma Lee Gross, Maryland senior, to 
Maryland graduate Joseph B. Gildenhorn, 
now attending Yale Law School. 

Guenther — Williams 

Rosemary Wade Guenther, Maryland 
alumna, to Midshipman Raymond L. Wil- 
liams, USX. 

Hammett — Gay lord 
Jacqueline Lee Hammett, Maryland 
alumna, to Lieut, jg. Sidney W. Gaylord, 
Jr., USNA alumnus, recently returned from 
Korea. 



r 




WHEN BASEBALL PLAYERS 

looked like this . . . 

Western Maryland Dairy was serving 
Baltimore with fine dairy products. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



WESTERN MARYLAND DAIRY 

Division of National Dairy Products Corp. 



MARTIN MOTORS CORP. 

SALES - SERVICE 
PAR T S 

WHOLESALE RETAIL 

SPECIALISTS in wheel alignment 

PICK UP and DELIVERY SERVICE 

FREE COURTESY CAR ... to shopping district 

and return 

Maryland's Largest 

CHRYSLER- PLYMOUTH DEALER 

1313 CATHEDRAL STREET BALTIMORE, MD. 



THE HOME OF 7 HOUR SERVICE 

D R I V E-IN 




l !2-""\ PULASKI HIGHWAY AT ERDMAN AVENI 

BRoadway 6600 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING, FUR STORAGE, RUG CLEANING 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



ETHEL M. TROY 

Life - INSURANCE - General 
17 Light Street LExington 7578 Baltimore 2, Md. 



41 




your age! 



If you are over 21 (or under 
101) it's none too soon for you 
to follow the example of our 
hero, Ed Parmalee (above) 
and face the life-saving facts 
about cancer, as presented in 
our new film "Man Alive!". 

You and Ed will learn that 
cancer, like serious engine 
trouble, usually gives you a 
warning and can usually be 
cured if treated early. 

For information on where 
you can see this film, call us 
or write to "Cancer" in care of 
your local Post Office. 



American Cancer Society 

1900 ST. PAUL STREET 
BALTIMORE 18. MD. 



f 



F.S Co., W.B.C. Co. 



18a6^3% 



HOTEL SUPPLY CO. INC/ 

MEATS -POULTRY 

.^V Frozen Food! aa> 

"^ajt^ Food Specialties JBS 

W» To Horelt. Institution! ,+Bffl 

, V 7ggk ship., ciubi, Etc. wi2jr 



*Jf 



*4LT 



SHANOVlB 



'MOM 



t*©-. 



* * 

Phone LExington 7055 



WHITMAN, REQUARDT 
& ASSOCIATES 

Engineers • Consultants 

Civil — Sanitary— Structural 
Mechanical — Electrical 

Reports, Plans, 
Supervision, Appraisals 

1304 ST. PAUL STREET 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



Hawkins — Van Vliet 

Both Maryland alumni. Sheila Margaret 
Hawkins, to Roger S. Van Yliet. 

Hering — Day 

Sarah Ruth Hering. Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital of Nursing, to Maurice H. Day, sen- 
tor at Maryland, Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Hoffman — Baer 

Both Maryland alumni. Judith Joan 
Hoffman to Eric A. Baer, All-American 
Soccer star. 

Jones — Vandegrift 

Barbara Louise Jones to Franklin E. 
Vandegrift, Maryland student. 

Joplin — Barr 

Joyes Warren Joplin, Stephens College 
and Juilliard School of Music, to Captain 
Andrew M. Barr, USA. Maryland alumnus, 
Fort Knox. 

King — Clark 

Joanne King. Trinity College, to Lieut. 
Melvin L. Clark. TJSMC, Maryland alum- 
nus. 

Knibb — Tyrie 

Both Maryland graduates, Miriam 
Bowles Knibb — Alpha Omicron Pi Soror- 
ity. Pi Delta Epsilon and Omicron Nu 
honorary societies, to John R. Tyrie, 
Delta Sigma Phi. 

Kurtz — Golberg 

Libby Freida Kurtz to Marvin B. Gol- 
berg, Pharmacy graduate, now dentistry 

student. 

Latimer — Shepherd 

Nance Jane Latimer. Maryland alumna 
to 1st Lieutenant James M. Shepherd, 
USAF, M. I. T. alumnus. 

Lawler — Kinsley 

Beverly Covell Lawler. Delta Gamma, 
to Earl L. Kinsley. Alpha Tau Omega. 
both Maryland graduates. 

Lewis — Wagner 

Mary Anne Lewis to Hugh E. Wagner, 
Jr., Maryland Law School student. 

Little — Blizzard 

Anne Worthington Little, Western 
Maryland, member of Prince Georges 
County Board of Education, to John C. 
Blizzard. Maryland graduate. 

Marland — Kroupa 

Both Maryland graduates. Patricia Ann 
Marland, Alpha Omicron Pi, to Edwood 
J. Kroupa. Jr.. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Mattie — Baldwin 

Maryland senior Elizabeth Hill Mattie, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sigma Tau Epsi- 
lon and Tau Omicron Phi. to Midshipman 
C53) Charles C. Baldwin. USN. Miss Mat- 
in', daughter of Rear Admiral Dominic L. 
Mattie. USN, was one of the princesses in 
tin 1 Annapolis Tercentenary celebration. 

Milstead — Bettendorf 

Joan Pauline Milstead to Philip E. Bet- 
tendorf. Alpha Tau Omega, Maryland 
graduate. 

Minick — Choppell 

Emily Louise Minick to Richard B. 
Chappell, Maryland alumnus. 



Morley — Burk 

Suzanne Morley, Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
to Allan D. Burk. Delta Sigma Pi and 
Theta Chi, both Maryland seniors. 

Murray — Cassidy 

Barbara Kauffman Murray, student at 
Middlebury. to Corporal James R. Cas- 
sidy, USMC, Maryland alumnus. 

Norris — Rohrer 

Leona Mae Norris to Conard R. Rohrer, 

former Maryland student. 

O'Donnell — May 

Anne-Hedwig O'Donnell. teacher at 
Alice Deal Junior High, D. C. to Mary- 
land alumnus John O. May. 

Offitt — Abeshouse 

Sara Offitt to George A. Abeshouse, 
School of Medicine student. 

Park — Montgomery 

Maxine Carol Park, American Univer- 
sity, to Lieut. Forest D. Montgomery, 
USAF, Maryland graduate. 

Perry — Jackson 

Johanne Edith Perry, Maryland senior, 
to Luther B. Jackson. Montgomery Junior 
College. 

Peter — Cissel 

Both Maryland alumni, Elizabeth Ann 
Peter. Alpha Omicron Pi, to John C. Cis- 
sel, Alpha Tau Omega. 

Peterson — Burnett 

Donna Jean Peterson, Maryland and 
Brigham Young. Lambda Delta Sigma, to 
Lloyd C. Burnett, George Washington. 

Piper — Riker 

Patricia Ann Piper, Maryland graduate, 
to Alexander J. Riker, University of Michi- 
gan. 

Pisner — Gerber 

Both Maryland seniors. Diana Pisner to 
Henry Gerber. 

Potter — deLaski 

Nancy Potter, former Maryland student, 
to Edgar G. deLaski. Maryland student, 
World War II veteran. 

Reiney — Harvey 

Mary Jane Reiney, Maryland graduate, 
Gamma Phi Beta, to Jack L. Harvey, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, Omicron Delta Kap- 
pa and Tau Beta Pi. 

Rhodes — Mo I Ion ee 
Jo Anne Rhodes, senior at Mary Wash- 
ington, to John B. Mallonee. Jr.. Maryland 
graduate. 

Rogers — Davies 
Both Maryland graduates. Gloria Mar- 
tell Rogers. Alpha Gamma Delta, to Leslie 
E. Davies, Phi Sigma Kappa and Alpha 
Chi Omega. 

Rouse — Prather 
Elaine Cert rude Rouse. Maryland alum- 
na, now a senior in nursing at Michigan, 
to John L. Prather, Johns Hopkins alum- 
nus, Physicist with the Army. 

Runkle — Pettit 

Jacqueline M. Runkle. Maryland alum- 
na. Kappa Delta, Montgomery County 
teacher, to John H. Pettit. World War II 
and Korea veteran. 



42 



Scates — Blair 

Dorothy Belle Scates. Hood College, to 
Sergeant David M. Blair. USMC, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Schoefer— Mills 

Both Maryland seniors, Jean Patricia 
Schaefer, Gamma Phi Beta, to Stanley A. 
Mills, Theta Chi. 

Schmidt — Kelly 

Meredith Lee Schmidt. Maryland alum- 
na, to Robert J. Kelly. Pharmacy alumnus. 

Schrott — Brown 
Elaine Esther Schrott to Stuart M. 
Brown. Maryland alumnus, now a junior in 
Medicine. 

Senge — Powell 
Both Maryland graduates. Barbara Eliz- 
abeth Senge. now a Northwestern High 
teacher, to Marshall P. Powell. 

Simons — Winterrowd 
Barbara Elizabeth Simons to Ronald B. 
Winterrowd. both Maryland alumni. 

Sless — Coppel 

Betty Lee Sless to Jules M. Coppel, 
Maryland student. 

Snelling — Marquess 

Helen Frances Snelling to Alvin J. Mar- 
quess, Maryland alumnus. 

Solomon — Seidman 

Suzanne Solomon to Jack Seidman, 
Maryland graduate. 

Spintman — Bennett 

Devorah M. Spintman. School of Nurs- 
ing alumna. Sigma Delta Tan. to Lawrence 
H. Bennett, graduate student at College 
Park. 

Spires Hay den 

Jean Katherine Spires to First Lieuten- 
ant Joseph E. Hayden. Jr., USA. Maryland 
alumnus. 

Stand lee — Buechler 

Wanda Standlee, Maryland alumna. Al- 
pha Omicron Pi. to Capt. Theodore B. 
Buechler, USAF, United States Military 
Academy graduate. 

Starobin — Stahl 

Frieda Starobin. Maryland graduate, 
now teaching at Sherwood High, to Sey- 
mour Stahl. George Washington Law 
school. 

Stevens — Butz 

Frances Jeanne Stevens, Maryland grad- 
uate, Alpha Omicron Pi. teacher at Park- 
wood Elementary school, to George W. 
Butz. Princeton alumnus and veteran of 
World War II service in India and the 
Aleutians. 

Stone — Runow 

Jane Elizabeth Stone, former Maryland 
-indent, to Hansjoachim H. Runow. Uni- 
versity of Virginia student. 



Swann — Patten 
Frances Swann. 
Ensign William 



Margaret Fiances Swann. Maryland 
senior, to Ensign William F. Patten. 
QSCG. 

Tansill — Morton 

Grace Lee Tansill. Catholic University, 
to Leon M. Morton. Maryland senior. 
World War II veteran. 







Restaurant Pierre 

It's Maryland with a French accent. 

A luxurious setting for leisurely dining 

or drinking, and a menu that rivals 

the best of La Belle France! 



' Bm jjJjjffiHig J'' 



Maryland's Only 
Truly Continental Restaurant 

704 N. HOWARD ST., BALTIMORE 
Closed Tues. Call Pierre for Reservations, LEx. 3506 




serve! 

Our Cooker-Cooked corn is cooked and 
sealed just 15 minutes after it is pulled! 
Natural flavor, tenderness and color is sealed 
in . . . just like eating fresh corn on the cob! 



Packers of Whole Kernel Shoepeg and Golden Sweet Corn 

F. O. MITCHELL & BRO., INC 

Ferryman, Maryland - Kennedyville, Maryland 

MAIN OFFICE. PERRYMAN, MD. - PHONE ABERDEEN 621-J 




Dukeland brand 

• SMOKED HAMS 

• PICNIC HAMS 

CORNED BEEF AND TONGUES 

SMOKED AND READY TO EAT 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Baltimore, Md. 




CARROLL R. SENNER 

REPAIRING and REFINISHING 
Antiques & Fine Furniture 

1721 MARYLAND AVENUE MU. 5200 BALTIMORE 1 



43 



DUNCAN BROTHERS, INC. 

CHEVROLET • OLDS • CADILLAC 
GMC TRUCKS • GREAT DANE TRAILERS 

Sales & Service 

"First In Service Because We Put Service First" 

Telephones 255-455-655 

POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 




Paul W. Phillips 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 



SUDLERSVILLE 
MARYLAND 



Tossi — Yonce 

Joan Catherine Tassi to Harvey A. 
Yonce, Maryland student. 

Texer — Libowitz 

Sara Lee Texer, State Teachers College 
senior, to Harvey Libowitz, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Troxler — Shawe 

E. Roney Troxler to Merrick E. Shawe, 
Phi Kappa Tau, both Maryland seniors. 

Wadlow— Walters 

Patricia Rae Wadlow, Maryland alumna, 
to Reginald R. Walters, Virginia. 

West — Futch 

Patricia Anne West, Maryland gradu- 
ate and assistant director of the Univer- 
sity's Wesley Foundation to Archer H. 
Futch, North Carolina graduate now a 
student at Maryland. 

White — Dilworth 

Katherine Marie White to Julius M. 
Dilworth, Maryland alumnus, served 3 



years with Navy 
World War II. 



Pacific Theatre in 



Wiese — Lawrence 

Patsy Ann Wiese. Maryland senior. Al- 
pha Omicron Pi, to Cadet Richard D. 
Lawrence, West Point senior and VMI 
alumnus. 

Williams — Langmack 

Diane Williams to Robert Langmack, 
Both Maryland alumni. 

Wood — Zimmerman 

Barbara Jan Wood to Benjamin G. Zim- 
merman, who attended Maryland. 



IT5Y BlTSY .4 

l£BRflPINKlM5^ 



The First 

Daniel George Mont, his christening 
postponed for two years so that it 
could take place in the Memorial Chapel, 
has the honor of being the first baby 
christened in the Chapel. 

The son of Tommy Mont, assistant foot- 
ball coach and former gridiron star for 
Maryland and the Washington Redskins, 
and Virginia Askin Mont, Danny was 
christened last October 26 by the Rev. 
James Bard, Methodist minister. 

Here's Chris Seibert 

To Mr. and Mrs. Vern Seibert, Mary- 
land backfield coach, the stork delivered 
a seven-pound, eight-ounce boy, named 
Christopher. 

Dental School Babies 

To Dr. and Mrs. Milton L. Taubkin, of 
Los Angeles, Cal., a son, Peter Allan, on 
December 8. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank P. Gilley '45, their 
fifth daughter, Cindy Beth, on November 
28. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry W. Teyker '50, a 
daughter, Patricia Anne, on June 9. 

Dr. and Mrs. George A. Weir, Jr. '51, a 
daughter, Mary Ellen, on December 29. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. Warren Rader '50, 
a son, Geoffrey Scott, on June 22. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry Kania '46, a son, 
Robert, on September 11. 

Dr. and Mrs. Eugene Nelson '46, a son, 
Barry N., on October 26. 

Dr. and Mrs. Rodger Currie '52 a daugh- 
ter. Gail, on October 8. 

Dr. and Mrs. Fred Weinstein '46, a 
daughter, Sandra Jane, on September 2. 

Dr. and Mrs. James L. Corthouts '36, 
their seventh daughter, Sandra Lee. 

Nursing School Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Brayton V. Danner, a 
son, David Winfield, on June 2, 1952. Mrs. 
Danner was Virginia Courtney Wicker, 
'36. 

To Lt. U. S. N. and Mrs. Michael An- 
gelo Iacona, a son. Michael Angelo, II, 
on Sept. 15, 1952. Mrs. Iacona was Char- 
lotte Halter, '48. 

To Dr. and Mrs. William Corpening. a 
son, Paul William, on Sept. 5, 1952. Mrs. 
Corpening was Avis Simons, '44. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Lee, a son, 
Patrick James, on Aug. 10, 1952, Mrs. Lee 
was Phyllis Alice Sliney, '46. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Carl Sunderland, a 



son, Steven Ray, on September 17, 1952. 
Mrs. Sunderland was Minnie V. Schafer, 
'47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William W. Roemer, 
a second son, William, Jr. on June 6, 1952. 
Mrs. Roemer was Joan (Jay) Seiders, '49. 

To Mr and Mrs. Hugh Burgess, a daugh- 
ter, Deborah Ann, on December 31, 1950. 
They also have another little girl, Sandra 
Lee. Mrs. Burgess graduated in '49. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Hope, Jr. a 
daughter, Denise Ann, on Oct. 1, 1952. 
Mrs. Hope was Dorothy Dansforth, '39. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Ruzicka, a 
daughter, on September 5, 1952. Mrs. Ru- 
zicka was Carola Graham, '38. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Tegler, a 
daughter, Lynn Bunting, on August 11, 
1952. Mrs. Tegler was Hortense Bunting, 
'48. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William E. Dixon, a 
son, Kent Almony, on Sept. 22, 1952. Mrs. 
Dixon was Ruth Almony, '41. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John H. Haase, a son, 
Frederick Albert, on Sept. 13, 1952. Mrs. 
Haase was Mary C. Scholl, '41. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John Philip White, III. 
a daughter, Elise Carol, on Sept. 20, 1952. 
Mrs. White was Geraldine Kilby White, 
'52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David S. Cook, a son, 
Richard, on August 10, 1952. They also 
have a son, David. Jr. two and one half 
years old. Mrs. Cook was Virginia Gil- 
lespie, '47. 

To Dr. and Mrs. James S. Hunter, Jr., 
a daughter, Cynthia Starr, on April 18, 
1951. Mrs. Hunter was Margaret May 
Stoner, '46. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Pendleton, a 
son, on August 16, 1952. Mrs. Pendleton 
was Grace Angelberger, '42. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Robert Carl Hunter, a 
son, Robert Carl, Jr., on Jan. 5. 1952. 
Mrs. Hunter was Grace Colburn, '48. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Paul D. McCoy, a son, 
"Bucky" John Stephen, on Nov. 15, 1952. 
Mrs. McCoy was Joanne Wilson, '51. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles McKenzie, a 
daughter, on November 27, 1952. Mrs. 
McKenzie was Lenore Miller, '45. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Await, a 
daughter, Diane Lee, on October 19, 1952. 
Mrs. Await was Jeanne Burgess, '48. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Miller, a 
son, Jan Christopher, on Nov. 7, 1952. 
Mrs. Miller was Amy Lee DeShane, '43. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Tennyson, a 
son, Thomas Bernard, on Nov. 24, 1952. 
Mrs. Tennyson was Anne L. Hutton, '46. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Kyle Swisher, a daugh- 
ter, Karen Ann, on Nov. 25, 1952. Mrs. 
Swisher was Nan V. Rittenhouse, '49. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Hubbard, a 
son, Christopher. Mrs. Hubbard was Anne 
Cochran, '47. 



Bob-O-Larks 

The Bob-O-Larks, sextette group of 
Maryland students, appeared on Art 
Lamb's television show. This was not to 
be their first TV appearance, however. 

Organized last year by their accompan- 
ist, Charles Haslup, the Bob-O-Larks have 
appeared on WBAL-TV in Baltimore and 
on WRC radio in Washington. 

They are Bob Benson, Mary Lou Mc- 
Kinley, Kitty Patrick, Elva Paul, Mary 
Ann Ward, Jean Corbin. and Pat Allen. 



44 ~ 



®apa 



Alexander A. Blackball, Jr. 

Lt. Alexander A. Blackball, Jr., Agricul- 
ture '52. was killed when his Thunder- 
jet crashed in Arizona. 

The crash occurred on a routine train- 
ing flight near Luke Air Force Base, where 
Lt. Blackball, 22, and his twin brother. 
William M., were on duty as Thunderjet 
pilots. 

The twins went directly into the Air 
Force upon graduation. They had been 
in the advanced Air Force ROTC. 

Since boyhood, the Blackball twins had 
shared the same interests. Their achieve- 
ments in 4-H work and at the university 
were accomplished as a team. 

Their chief interest was in livestock. 
Since they were 10 years old, they have 
been winning prizes for livestock breeding 
and judging at various county and State 
•'airs. 

Alexander represented the Maryland 
4-H Club at the National 4-H Camp in 
1949. In addition to his 4-H work as a 
youth, he was active in the youth fellow- 
ship of the Methodist Church. 

Alexander was known as "Sandy" by 
his friends, most of whom never learned 
to tell him and his brother apart. 

Their father, Alexander A. Blackball, 
Sr., is widely known in beef cattle circles. 
So is their sister, Mary Eleanor Blackball, 
who is in her freshman year at the Uni- 
versity. 

The flyer also is survived by his mother 
and another sister, Mrs. Isabelle Thomp- 
son, wife of Prof. Arthur Thompson of the 
University of Maryland. 

Philip C. Turner 

Philip Calder Turner, 74, member of 
the Board of Regents, died recently. 

Mr. Turner, a for- 
mer president of the 
State Farm Bureau, 
was active in agri- 
cultural work in 
Maryland. As a 
member of the 
Board of Regents, 
he was automatical- 
ly a member of the 
State Board of Agri- 
culture. 

Born in Clarks- 
ville, Ga., Mr. Tur- 
ner moved to Mary- 
land 21 years ago. 

He had been a 
Regent since May, 
1941. His current term would have expired 
in 1959. 

Before coming to Maryland, he was a 
civil engineer for two railroads. 

Dr. Edmund E. Miller 

Dr. Edmund E. Miller, Director of the 
University's European Program, died at 
his home in Heidelberg, on January 29, 
1953. due to heart failure. 

Dr. Miller was an outstanding authority 
on European study programs, and for the 
past year had been head of the Univer- 
sity's 93 centers scattered over Germany, 




Mr. Turner 



Fiance. Great Britain, and North Africa. 

He was bom in Painesville, Ohio, on 
May 8. 1900. He graduated from Wash- 
ing! on Missionary College in 1923 and 
then spent several years in study abroad 
at Tuebingen and Heidelberg, as well as 
in Spain. He took his Master's Degree 
at Johns Hopkins in 1933. He taught in 
the language department of St. Johns 
College and at Delaware and Maryland. 
During World War II he served as Field 
Director in the American Red Cross. 

Dr. Miller had the strong conviction 
that as many Americans as possible should 
avail themselves of the benefits of study 
abroad in order to become acquainted with 
Europeans and their ideas. He translated 
this belief into action by organizing the 
German Junior Year in Munich, 1935 to 
1939. and after the war in Zurich from 
1945 to 1950. From 1947 to 1950 he was 
Director of the Graduate Year Abroad, 
organized under the auspices of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in Paris and Zurich. 
From 1950 on he was with the University 
of Maryland European Program, which 
offers university courses to officers and 
enlisted men abroad. 

Dr. Miller is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Emmy Miller, who remains in Heidelberg. 

Funeral services were conducted in the 
American chapel at Heidelberg. 

T. S. Eoder, D.D.S., '82 

Dr. Thomas S. Eader '82 (B.C.D.S.), of 
Frederick, Md., died on December 14, 
1952. Born in Frederick on April 10, 1860, 
Dr. Eader grew up in that city. After a 
year of employment as a clerk for a dry- 
goods firm, he became interested in den- 
tistry. As the first step in his preparation 
for a professional career he entered the 
office of Dr. Edward McSherry, a promi- 
nent Frederick dentist. In 1880 young 
Eader entered the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, from which his mentor 
had graduated in 1868. As a member of 
the Class of 1882, Dr. Eader was, espe- 
cially for that time, an unusually young 
graduate in dentistry. 

Then began his amazing career as a 
practitioner, which ended with his retire- 
ment in September of 1952, at the age of 
92 and after 70 years of practice in Fred- 
erick. During that long period he was 
absent from his office only two days be- 
cause of illness. At his retirement he prob- 
ably was the oldest practicing dentist in 
the country. His record of 70 years of 
practice is the longest ever achieved by 
a graduate of the several Baltimore den- 
tal schools. 

Dr. Eader's wide range of interest in 
the affairs of his profession is evidenced by 
the local, state and national honors con- 
ferred upon him, reflecting the high es- 
teem in which he was held by his asso- 
ciates. The originator and a charter mem- 
ber of the Frederick County Dental So- 
ciety, he served as its president from 1918 
to 1928; the initiator of the Frederick 
Free Dental Clinic, he was its president 
from 1925 to 1930. He was president of 
the Frederick County Dental Association, 
1934-35 and 1939-40; he served as presi- 
dent of the Maryland State Dental Asso- 
ciation, 1927-29; a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Dentists, he was chairman 
of the Maryland Section, 1946-47; the 
oldest active member of the American 



Nine Advantages of 
Washington Permanent 

Home Loans 

LOW RATES— EASY PAYMENTS 

LONG TIME TO PAY 

INTEREST REDUCED MONTHLY 

LIBERAL REPAYMENT 

PROMPT SERVICE 

DEAL WITH LOCAL PEOPLE 

EXPERT COUNSEL— NO RED TAPE 

We welcome your inquiry 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 
INVITED 

LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 

\\ashinqton. \trmantnt 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

Carl J. Bergmann, President 

629 F STREET, N. W. 

Established 1881 



Frank M. 
Dorsey & 
Sons, Inc. 

HEATING 

PLUMBING 

AIR CONDITIONING 

Phone: LAwrence 6-8070 

820 Michigan Ave., N.E. 
WASHINGTON 17, D. C. 



Out Specialty 

SCHOOL LETTERING 

BANNERS 

BOWLING SHIRTS 

905 EYE STREET, N.W. 
EX 3-1168 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



[45] 




f 



ORCHIDS 

Glamor-Touch for 
Your Easter Outfit! 

Be sure they're from Gude's, green- 
house-fresh and delicately hued. Why 
not send an Easter orchid to your 
favorite friend — by Florists' Tele- 
graph Delivery. 




IN SILVER SPRING: 
ELLSWORTH DR. NEAR FENTON.JU. 7-71 
IN WASHINGTON: 
1212 F STREET. N.W.. NA. 8-4276 
5016 CONNECTICUT AVE.. EM. 3-1225 
IN ARLINGTON: 
2812 S. RANDOLPH ST.. OV. 3-0700 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 



Heating 
Ventilating 



Air Conditioning 

• 
Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 

1240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

MATS: Any Size — Any Quantity 

24 Hour Service 
STEREOTYPES: Complete Blocking and 

Mortising Facilities 
MAILING: Addressing, Packaging 

1428 YOU STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 9, D.C. NOrth 7-1249 



Dental Association, he had represented 
Maryland in the House of Delegates at 
several meetings. Dr. Eader held hon- 
orary memberships in Xi Psi Phi. the Gor- 
gas Odontological Society. Omicron Kappa 
TJpsilon, and the Delaware Stale Dental 
Association. 

Dr. Eader had been an outstanding 
citizen of his community. For 16 years 
he served as organist and choirmaster of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He had 
been prominent in local musical circles, 
as a saxophonist in the Frederick Concert 
Orchestra and as a capable pianist. His 
numerous non-professional affiliations in- 
cluded membership in Lynch Lodge, A.F. 
and A.M.; Mountain City Lodge, I.O.O.F.; 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Dr. Eader married Catherine Elicit of 
Frederick in 1884. Mrs. Eader died in 
1928. Of their six children three survive: 
Mrs. Pauline Everhart. of Washington, 
D. C; Mrs. Margaret Moul. of Hanover. 
Pa.; and Mrs. Helen Johnson, of Fred- 
crick. 

Arthur W. Erskine, M.D. 

One of Maryland's most distinguished 
graduates. Arthur W. Erskine. M.D., 
'08. internationally recognized X-ray au- 
thority, died recently in Cedar Rapids. 
Iowa. 

Dr. Erskine's record in X-ray research 
was built up. literally, at the expense of his 
own health. 

Injury to his hands 
during experiments in 
a day whin the effects 
of r a d i a t i o n were 
little - known necessi- 
tated some 30 opera- 
tions and the loss of 
all but his thumb and 
little finger on his 
right hand. 

But he was honored 
many times and in 
various ways by his 
colleagues in radiolog- 
ical work. 

His book on "Practical X-ray Treat- 
ment" is considered by many to be the 
physician's "Bible" in this field. Its new 
fourth edition now is being proofread pre- 
paratory to issuance. 

Widespread use of the book is indicated 
by the fact that in recent years physicians 
from as far away as Siam and Greece had 
contacted him to tell him they used the 
book and to congratulate him for writing 
it. 

Dr. Erskine belonged to many profes- 
sional and civic organizations, and served 
in official capacities for many of them. 

He was secretary of the Iowa division of 
the American Cancer Society and holder 
of a bronze medal and citation as "the 
Iowan who contributed most to cancer 
control in 1951." 

He served as president of the Radiologi- 
cal Society of North America (1925); 
chairman of the Iowa committee on medi- 
cal education in hospitals; district coun- 
selor and president (1938-39) of the Iowa 
State Medical Society; chairman of the 
American Medical Association's section on 
radiology; president of the American Col- 
lege of Radiology, which sets the standards 
for education of X-ray specialists, and 
president of the Iowa X-ray club. 




Dr. Erskine 



Other professional organizations to 
which he gave his time were the commit- 
tee on standardization of X-ray measure- 
ments of the North American Society, the 
Iowa State Medical Society committee on 
cancer control, the executive board of the 
women's field army of the American Can- 
cer Society, the American Roentgen Ray 
Society and the board of censors of the 
American College of Radiology. 

While in France in the summer of 1950. 
he was the honored guest at a luncheon 
given by the Curie society of Paris. 

A dinner in his honor after his election 
as president of the Iowa Medical Society 
brought out an array of outstanding medi- 
cal men in numbers and importance seldom 
equalled in any gathering outside of a 
meeting of the American Medical Associa- 
tion. 

Among the many were two current pres- 
idents and two past presidents of radio- 
logical societies, as well as many other 
well-known medical men. 

Dr. Erskine had traveled extensively. 

In 1950 he attendeil the Sixth Interna- 
tional Congress of Radiology in London 
and the Fifth International Cancer con- 
gress in Pan-. 

In 1934. while touring Europe, he visited 
the island of Cavtat. Yugoslavia, legendary 
birthplace of the Greek "god of medicine 
and father of all medical men." He brought 
back wood from the island which he carved 
into a gavel which he later presented to 
the Linn County Medical Society. 

Dr. Erskine was known as a talented 
wood-carver. In 1944 one of his wood carv- 
ings won a prize given by the A. M. A. 
Physicians' Art Association. 

He also was known as a writer. 

His most recent works were a technical 
article in Radiology magazine in October, 
and the revised edition of his textbook, 
written while he was recuperating from a 
recent illness. 

In addition to his wood carving, he 
listed fishing as one of his favorite hobbies. 
Quietly, he had helped finance several stu- 
dents' study at Coe college. 

A native of Pennsylvania, he was born 
May 6. 1885. the son of George G. and 
Anna Wright Erskine. 

He studied at Hiram college, Hiram. 
Ohio, and received his M.D. degree in 
1908 from the University of Maryland. 

Before coming to Cedar Rapids in 1912 
he practiced for four years at Bessemer. 
Pa. He was married to Betsy Smith in 
Buffalo. X. Y., Aug. 24. 1916. 

Surviving in addition to his wife are 
two sisters, Mrs. Arthur Cunningham and 
Mrs. Edward Teal, and three brothers. 
Ralph, Paul, and George. 

Lewis W. Falkner, M.D. 

Dr. Lewis W. Falkner (Med. '07). 72. 
mayor of Youngstown. N. Y.. died recently 
at Buffalo. N. Y. 

A native of Youngstown. he was a son 
of Dr. William Falkner. with whom he be- 
gan his practice of medicine. He served as 
a major with the Medical Corps in France 
during World War I. 

He also attended Niagara University and 
the University of Buffalo. He is survived 
by his wife, Mrs. Eleanor Falkner, two 
sons, Carl and M. William, and a daughter, 
Mrs. Daniel McKeever. 



46 



Comdr. Hal K. Evans 

Cornell. Halbert K. Evans, Maryland 
hurdle star in the late 1930s, lost his life 
in Korea on what was to have been his 
last mission before starting home for 
Christmas, downed by enemy anti-aircraft 
while returning from combat to the carrier 
Bonne Homme Richard. He commanded 
the "Sunday Punchers." attack squadron 
75. 

The 35-year-old flyer went into the 
Navy's air arm after graduating from 
Maryland in 1040 and won two Distin- 
guished Flying Crosses and the Air Medal 
in World War II. 

He held the 220-yard low hurdle record 
at Maryland and was a regular winner of 
the low and high hurdle events in Southern 
Conference track meets. 

In 1040 Evans ran second in the 400- 
meter hurdles' championship of America, 
and in the National junior A.A.U. cham- 
pionships. 

Comdr. Evans is survived by his widow. 
the former Miss Mary H. Callander, and 
two children. Karen, 10. and Halbert K.. 
Jr.. 6. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Evans, Granville, Ohio; a brother. War- 
ren R. Evans, Frederick. Md., and a sis- 
ter. Mrs. Shaw H. Matthews, Bladensburg. 

Tin Commander was a brother of War- 
ren Evans, Maryland football and track 
luminary, who is Physical Education Di- 
rector for the Frederick County Board of 
Education. 

Hon. Samuel K. Dennis 

Judge Samuel K. Dennis. (Law '03) 
former member of the Board of Regents 
and very active in that office, died re- 
cently in Baltimore. 

Judge Dennis was born on September 
28. 1S74. at Beverly, the old Dennis home 
near Pocomoke. Worcester county. He was 
the son of Samuel K. and Sally Crisfield 
Dennis. 

He was elected to the State Legislature 
from his home county in 1904, and the 
sami year became secretary to Gov. John 
Walter Smith, and Judge Dennis was 
launched on a career which made him a 
power in Maryland affairs from then on. 
From time to time lie was mentioned as a 
candidate for the governorship. 

He was United States district attorney 
from 1915 to 1920 and was appointed 
chief judge of the courts in Baltimore on 
August 27. 1928. relinquishing that post in 
1944 at the statutory retirement age of 70. 

After Ins term in the House and secre- 
taryship under Governor Smith, he was 
elected to the State Senate from Wor- 
cester. 

He was United States district attorney 
after the election of Woodrow Wilson as 
President. 

Noted for his plain talk and impatience 
with unnecessarily round-about legal 
phraseology lie was known to friends as 
"Sam Dennis from the Shore." 

Among his pel projects were the trans- 
fer of the Juvenile Court to the jurisdic- 
tion of the Supreme Bench of Baltimore 
and the founding of the Maryland Tuber- 
culosis Sanatorium at Sabillasville. 

Judge Dennis had vigor and industry 
and a legal mind which knew how to get 
to the central point in any complicated 
proceeding. H» will be besl remembered 
by hi- many friends as a man of saltv 





WRITE OR PHONE FOR ILLUSTRATED FOLDERS ON 



Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Central America 




Havana 

Hawaii 

Mediteranean 

PHONE— ADams 2-8700 



Nassau 

Panama 

South America 



WORLD-WIDE TfiflVft S£RVIC€ CORP. 



2311 CALVERT ST., N.W. 



WASHINGTON 8, D.C. 



r 



"\ 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 



Members 

WASHINGTON STOCK EXCHANGE 

PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



Southern Building 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3131 



115 N. St. Asaph 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



V 



KENMAR 
STEEL 

CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



structural steel erection 



setting reinforcing steel 



\ 2041 K St., N.W. 
- Washington/ D.C. 
) STerling 3-3290 



ANDERSON ELECTRIC CO. 



SALES & 
SERVICE 

1433 P St., N.W. 



INDUSTRIAL 
COMMERCIAL 



MOTORS - PUMPS - MACHINERY 
DU. 7-5527 



Washington, D.C. 



[47 



Paul V. Downing 

PAVING CONTRACTOR 

Asphalt • Concrete 

Estimates Furnished 
upon request 

Phone 7590 
SALISBURY, MD. 



The Eley 
Construction Co. 

CONTRACTORS 
& BUILDERS 

"We Build and Finance 
Homes" 

OFFICE— HILLSBORO 3211 
NITE PHONE— 3212 

QUEEN ANNE, MARYLAND 



Berlin 
Milling 

Company 

Incorporated 1909 

Berlin's Best Feeds 

BERLIN, MARYLAND 



R. B. BAKER 
& SONS, Inc. 

Road Contractors 

Specializing in Macadam & Gravel 

NEW MARKET SAND & GRAVEL 
FOR SALE 

PHONE 3351 

QUEENSTOWN, MD. 



E. MACE SMITH 

Buyers & Shippers of Farm Produce 

FERTILIZERS, FEEDS OF ALL KINDS, 

BEAN BASKETS, ETC. 
Phone 163 Princess Anne, Md. 



WEBSTER 

"THE COAL MAN" 

SMALL LOTS TO CARLOADS 

Call Hurlock 3561 or 3571 

East New Market, Md. 



personality. He told remarkable stories 
and said remarkable things, the sort of 
man whose name was always cropping up 
in the conversation of those who knew him. 
"Sam Dennis said this" or "Judge Dennis 
did that" were phrases on many lips. Add 
to this quality his professional attainments 
and his outspokenness in support of his 
convictions and the result could not fail 
to be impressive. 

Judge Dennis is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Helen Gordon Moore Dennis, to 
whom he was married on June 1, 1911. 

Also, a brother, Arthur C. Dennis; a 
sister, Mrs. Mary Dennis Balloch ; a niece, 
Mrs. Joshua Bunting, and nephews Alfred 
Pearce Dennis. Jr., (U. S. Consul at 
Genoa) ; John Value Dennis ; John Dennis 
McMaster. Alfred McMaster, and Robert 
L. Oates. 

Charlotte Calvert Spence 

Mrs. Charlotte Calvert Spence, 82, a 
descendant of the first Lord Baltimore, 
died recently in Washington. 

She was married in 1899 to the late 
Thomas H. Spence, dean emeritus of the 
College of Arts and Sciences of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Mr. Spence died 
in 1937. 

A descendant of George Calvert, the 
founder of Maryland, Mrs. Spence was 
the granddaughter of Charles Benedict 
Calvert who founded the Maryland Agri- 
culture College, now the University of 
Maryland. 

She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. 
William J. Lescure, Mrs. E. Craig Wilton, 
and Mrs. Mary Spence ; four grandchildren 
and three sisters, Mrs. Henry Walter Lilly 
and Mrs. George Calvert and Mrs. W. 
D. Nelson Thomas and a brother, C. 
Baltimore Calvert. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Dr. Edward A. Looper (Sch. of Med. 
'12), 64, one of the nation's foremost nose, 
throat and bronchoscopic surgeons, died 
suddenly from a heart attack an hour 
after he had completed an operation at the 
Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore. 
His daughter. Miss Sybil A. Looper, no- 
ticed that he looked ill and called her 
brother and a physician. 

Dr. Looper was head of the ear, nose 
and throat department at University Hos- 
pital and a professor at the School of 
Medicine. University of Maryland. 

Dr. Looper was one of the country's lead- 
ing authorities on laryngeal tuberculosis; 
a national pioneer in the development of 
surgical techniques for the removal of can- 
cerous larynx; and one of the first men in 
Maryland to pioneer in the field of bron- 
choscopy. 

Several times during his career the pub- 
lic read dramatic accounts of delicate op- 
erations performed by him. 

Once he stopped a Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad train outside of Cincinnati to re- 
move a broken button from the windpipe 
of a 5-year-old girl who was choking to 
death. 

Dr. Looper set up an operating table 
in the baggage car and during a thirteen- 
minute stop removed the button and saved 
the girl's life. 

The collection of objects that Dr. Loop- 
er removed from bronchial tubes, throats, 



esophagi and larynxes ranged from a 2- 
ineh-long bolt with a half-inch nut on it 
to the pocket flap of a heavy overcoat. 

Dr. Looper kept this collection at the 
Looper Clinic, which he set up at Univer- 
sity Hospital as a memorial to his 2-year- 
old daughter, Lola Elsie Looper, who died 
from a bronchial disorder. 

The child swallowed a bit of celery, 
which became lodged in her bronchus, and 
the accident brought on pneumonia which 
caused her death. 

Dr. Looper purchased the equipment 
for the clinic and paid for its installation. 
The clinic was opened to serve all persons 
suffering from ear, nose or throat troubles. 

During the twenties, Dr. Looper used to 
spend almost every Sunday at the State 
Tuberculosis Sanatorium in Sabillasville, 
Frederick county, treating patients with 
tuberculosis of the larynx. 

Dr. Looper 's work was acclaimed by 
medical societies and institutions through- 
out the country. 

The son of John and Jennie Stewart 
Looper, Dr. Looper was born in Silver 
City, Ga., in 1888. He had been a pro- 
fessor at the University of Maryland Med- 
ical School since 1913. 

During World War I he served overseas 
for two years as a captain in the Army 
Medical Corps. 

In addition to his wife, son and daugh- 
ter, Dr. Looper is survived by three broth- 
ers, John, Harry and Glenn Looper, and a 
sister, Mrs. L. Mattlat. 

Charles A. Futterer 

Charles A. Futterer, A&S, '23- '26, former 
Government attorney, died as a result of 
smoke suffocation in a fire that completely 
burned out the Futterer home in Chevy 
Chase. 

Apparently he had been smoking while 
watching television and had fallen asleep 
in an upholstered chair. Only the chair 
springs remained after the fire was under 
control. 

There were no serious burns on the body. 
Mr. Futterer's son, Charles C. Futterer, 
19, told police that when he went out 
shortly after 5 p.m., his father was sitting 
in the chair watching television. 

Mr. Futterer's body was found in the 
hallway with his coat pulled up around his 
head as if to protect his face from the fire. 
It appeared Mr. Futterer was heading for 
the rear door. His wife, Mary Ann, was 
visiting her brother at the time of the fire. 

Mr. Futterer was with the RFC from 
1932 to 1936 and from 1939 to 1941. He 
went with the Army Engineers in 1941, and 
after the war served as counsel with the 
Congressional Committee on Government 
Expenditures under Representative Hardy, 
Democrat, of Virginia. 

Mr. Futterer was with the Charles W. 
Young Co., of New York from 1936 to 
1939, as an investment counsel. His spe- 
cialty was railroad research. He also was 
connected with the Union Trust Co., of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Franklin D. Day 

Frnnklin D. Day, (U. Md. Agr. Ed. '20), 
who recently retired from the superin- 
tendency of schools in Queen Anne's 
County, died recently. 

He had been Superintendent of Schools 



48 



in Queen Anne's since '32 and prior to 
that in Calvert County for five years. 

The recent Representative Assembly 
passed a resolution praising the late Su- 
perintendent as an educator whose "coun- 
sel and advice were highly regarded and 
sought after by his fellow superintendents 
and co-workers. By Ins death the Mary- 
land schools have lost a wise leader and 
able servant." 

Alexander L. McKibbin, D.D.S., '10 
Alexander Lee McKibbin, D.D.S. '10, 
of Clarksburg, W. Va., died on Janu- 
ary 12, 1952. Born in Buck Valley, Pa., 
he came to the B.C.D.S. from Crystal 
Springs, Pa. He was a member of Xi Psi 
Phi. Following his graduation Dr. Mc- 
Kibbin practiced in .Salem. W. Va. In 
1914 he moved to Clarksburg. He was a 
member of Clarksburg Lodge No. 155, 
A.F. and A.M., the Scottish Rite bodies of 
Clarksburg and Wheeling, the Nemesis 
Temple of the Shrine, and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, Mrs. Edna Wilson Mc- 
Kibbin, and a brother, John, of Olympia, 
Wash. 

Major Nelson J. Thomas 
Major Nelson John Thomas D.D.S. '29, 
died at the Base Hospital, Boiling Field, 
Va., on October 11, 1952. A native of Elm 
Grove, W. Va., he came to Baltimore in 
1918. After graduation he began practice 
in Baltimore. In World War II he served 
with the 14th Air Force in the China-India 
theatre. In February of 1951 he was re- 
called to the service as a reserve officer. 
Following a tour of duty in Puerto Rico 
he was assigned to Boiling Field. Major 
Thomas is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Katherine Mack Thomas. 

James L. Piper, D.D.S. 

James L. Piper, D.D.S. '02, of North- 
wood, N.H., died on September 26, 1952. 
He practiced for several years in Lynn, 
Mass., before removing to Northwood. 
Dr. Piper was well known in the poultry 
industry of New Hampshire and was a 
pioneer in the development of the New- 
Hampshire breed of poultry. He was a 
member of the Farm Bureau and the New 
Hampshire Poultry Growers' Association 
and held memberships in Psi Omega and 
the Morrison Lodge A.F. and A.M. 

Arthur A. Tetu, D.D.S. 

Arthur A. Tetu, D.D.S., '19, of Balti- 
more, Md., died on July 17, 1952. A na- 
tive of Woonsocket, R. I., Dr. Tetu had 
practiced in the Sparrows Point area of 
Baltimore County for over thirty years. 
He was a member of Psi Omega and the 
Gorgas Odontological Society. Dr. Tetu 
was a lover of outdoor sports, with a par- 
ticular interest in fishing. A pioneer in 
developing ice fishing in the Chesapeake 
Bay, he had returned from a fishing trip 
in the Gaspe region only a few days be- 
fore his death. He served in the Army 
during World War I and was a Past-Com- 
mander of the American Legion post in 
Sparrows Point. Dr. Tetu is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Lillian Tiemeyer Tetu; two 
daughters: Mrs. Meredith R. Wilson and 
Miss Suzanne L. Tetu. both of Baltimore; 
two sisters: Mrs. Anthony D'Angelo, of 
Bristol, R.I., and Mrs. Ralph Flynn, of 
Woonsocket, R. I.; and a brother, Dr. 
Henrv Tetu, of Woonsocket. 




Satisfy 

MIY... 

With the MILK 
that comes 
FIRST. . . 

FIRST WITH THE 
"CARRIAGE"TRADE! 



GOLDEN 
GUERNSEY MILK 



KOONTZ 




. EXTRA RICH 

• EXTRA NOURISHING 

. EXTRA DELICIOUS 



DISTRIBUTED ON THE EASTERN SHORE 
by 

KENNERSLEY FARM DAIRY 
CITY DAIRY, Inc. 



J. MeKenny Willis 

& Son. Inc. 




GRAIN 
FEED 
SEED 



Easton, Md. 




Phono 
744 





E. 


s. 


ADKINS & COMPANY 








"Everything Needed for Building" 




PHONE 


3171 




SALISBURY, 


MD. 



49' 




Phone JU. 5-4562 



ENGRAVING CO. 



969 T«Ay«R AVHE-SiLVtR SPRING MO' 



PHOTOENGRAVERS OF 

FINE LINE, BENDAY, HALFTONE AND COLOR PRINTING PLATES 
ON ZINC, COPPER AND TRIPLEMETAL 



WILSON PONTIAC, Inc. 

Silver Spring's Oldest Automobile Agency — Established 1935 

Pontiac Sales • Service • Parts 

7925 GEORGIA AVE. Opposite Hot Shoppe SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Montgomery - Stubbs 

Motors, Inc. 




fllERCURY 



SALES and SERVICE 
1200 EAST WEST HIGHWAY 

Silver Spring, Maryland 
JUniper 9-8040 




WISE OWL 

i^rse, Potato Chips 

Disfributors 

10753 Colesville Road 

Silver Spring, Md. 




r 



MODERN 
REALTY CO. 

REALTORS - INSURANCE 

Specializing in 
Montgomery Co. Property 

JU: 7-5350 
9719 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



INSURED SAVINGS 

Earn Liberal Dividends 

Citizens Bldg. & Loan 

Pershing & Fenton Silver Spring 



Culp Welding Co. 

GENERAL WELDING & 
MACHINE WORKS 

JUniper 5-8244 
937 Selim Rd. Silver Spring, Md. 



Ardie W. Gregory, D.D.S. 

Ardie William Gregory D.D.S. '26, of 
Baltimore, Md., died on September 7, 
1952. Dr. Gregory entered Maryland from 
Webster Springs, W. Va. He was the 
Assistant Deputy Councillor of Psi Omega, 
served on the Council of the Baltimore 
City Dental Society, and was a delegate 
to the American Dental Association. He 
was Associate Oral Surgeon at the Har- 
riet Lane Home of the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. An enthusiastic sportsman Ardie 
was the president-elect of the Wiltondale 
Gun Club. Besides his wife, Mrs. Marie 
E. Gregory, he is survived by three broth- 
ers— Oakie, Roy, and Olen, of Webster 
Springs — and by two stepsons, Dr. Ver- 
non T. Hart '50 and Theodore G. Hart, 
of Baltimore. 

Raymond E. Blais, D.D.S. 

Raymond E. Blais. D.D.S., '39. of Holy- 
oke, Mass., died on November 16, 1952. A 
native of Holyoke, he attended the Mt. St. 
Charles Academy before entering Hob- 
Cross College. At Holy Cross Ray played 
on the varsity football team. Following his 
graduation from Maryland, he interned at 
the Jersey City Medical Center. Desiring 
to specialize in orthodontics Dr. Blais took 
a postgraduate course at the Dewey School 
of Orthodontia. In June of 1943 he was 
commissioned a lieutenant in the U. S. 
Navy Dental Corps. On his separation 
from the service in January, 1946, he re- 
opened his office for the practice of ortho- 
dontics. Dr. Blais was a member of Psi 
Omega and was the treasurer of his class 
in the senior year. His other affiliations in- 
clude the Elks, the Knights of Columbus, 
and Kiwanis. Besides his wife, the former 



Maureen Shea, Dr. Blais leaves a son, Ray- 
mond E., Jr., and four daughters: Made- 
line, Jacqueline, Christina, and Maureen. 

Donald S. Hunter, D.D.S. 

Donald Scott Hunter, DJD.S., '36, of 
Towson, Md., died on January 5, 1953. A 
victim of poliomyelitis, Dr. Hunter had 
been totally paralyzed since he was 
stricken on November 21, 1946. Despite 
his condition he courageously endeavored 
to support his family by conducting an 
insurance business and selling stationery 
office supplies and magazine subscriptions. 
A severe attack of pneumonia suffered two 
years ago so weakened his respiratory tract 
that he had been continuously confined to 
a respirator. Dr. Hunter is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Heimert Hunter, 
and three sons: Donald Scott, Jr., Carroll 
Lee and Barry Edward. 

Armfield F. Von Bibber 

Dr. Armfield Franklin Van Bibber, 80, 
(M.D. '96) died recently in Baltimore. 

One of his sons Col. Edwin Michael Van 
Bibber, is on duty with the Army in Ger- 
many. The other, George Van Bibber, is 
on a trip to South America. 

A resident of Bel Air, he was the dean of 
physicians in Harford county, where he 
had been in general practice since gradu- 
ating. 

Dr. Van Bibber's avocation was poetry. 
He compiled a volume of verse under the 
title, "The Complete Poetical Works of 
A. F. Van Bibber." 

In addition to his two sons and wife, the 
former Rebecca Michael, Dr. Van Bibber 
is survived by two daughters, Miss Kath- 
arine Van Bibber, headmistress of the 
Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, and Mrs. 
William T. Whitney, of Randolph Center, 
Vt. 

Two sisters, Miss Lena Van Bibber, and 
Mrs. Harriet Shriver, and four grandchil- 
dren also survive. 

*••*•*•**** 

No Resurrection 

In burying the hatchet don't insist on a 
shallow, well-marked grave for it. 

*********** 

'S True! 

Silence d< monstrates a fine command of 
language. 

********** 

Nature gives you features, but you pick 
your own teeth. 




"Our Terpy isn't like other children. He 
lives in a little world all his own!" 



501 




CLUB HONORS 

All-America Athletes and Outstanding 
Citizens. New Officers Elected 



Maryland's Alumni "M" Club had not 
fully completed its annual banquet 
at the Belvedere Hotel in Baltimore the 
evening of January 30 before it had an- 
nounced that the 1954 affair would he held 
at the same place at the same date, but 
that it would he on a Saturday instead 
of Friday, as it was this year. 

With more than 425 in attendance, in- 
cluding Governor McKeldin and many 
other of the outstanding men of the State, 
it was easily the most pretentious event 
yet given by the men who have won 
"M's" in various athletic endeavors. 

In addition to awarding of trophies to 
Maryland's five all-Americas of the year, 
honorary "M" Club memberships were 
extended to five citizens, adjudged by the 
organization to have made notable contri- 
butions to the American way of life. 

"M" Presentations 

Presentation of famed "M" certificates 
were made to the following: 

Charles F. McCormick, president and 
chairman of the board of McCormick and 
Co., spice importers, by Hon. Millard E. 
Tydings. 

Dr. George E. Bennett. Maryland 
Alumnus, Baltimore orthopedic surgeon, 
widely known in sports for his medical 
reclamation of injured athletes, by Judge 
William P. Cole, chairman of the Board 
of Regents. 

James P. S. Devereaux. United States 
Congressman, second district of Maryland, 
Brigadier General Marine Corps hero of 
Wake Island, by Dr. Charles W. Sylvester. 

Melvin H. Baker, outstanding indus- 
trialist and chairman of the board of the 
National Gypsum Company, by Gov. 
Theodore R. McKeldin. 

Neil H. Swanson, executive editor of 
the Baltimore Sunpapers, by Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, University president. 

Present were Maryland's Charley Keller, 
New York Yankees baseball great, and 
Bob Williams, former Notre Dame star, 
now with the Chicago Bears. 

Tom Biddison, Speaker 

Thomas Biddison, city solicitor of Balti- 
more, a former Johns Hopkins football 
and lacrosse star who pla3'ed against many 
of the "M" men present, pinch hit for 
Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro, who was 
out of the city, to present all-America 
awards to Jack Scarbath, Dick Modzelew- 
ski and Tom Cosgrove in football and 
Bill Hubbell and Bill Larash in lacrosse, 

Art Guepe, football coach at Virginia, 
was the principal speaker, giving his ideas 
of what goes to make up a grid star; 
Ford Loker, retiring president, gave a 
few words of welcome. Joe Deckman was 
ti last master, and the invocation was given 
by the Rev. J. Arthur Geschwind, pastor 
of Park Community Church. 

Coach Jim Tatum, who introduced 
Guepe, said that the new football rules 
had not done away with the platoon sys- 



By Bill Hottel 

tem, but, that there would be two teams 
which would have to play both offense 
and defense for two quart cms each. He 
likes Maryland's outlook for 1953, except 
for ends, pointing out that the Terps had 
two fine all-around quarterbacks in Ber- 
nie Faloney and Lynn Beightol to run 
the split-T. 

It was announced at the banquet that 
it was planned to have the annual Varsity 
— "M" Club spring football game on 
May 1. 

Prior to the banquet the annual busi- 
ness meeting of the "M" Club was held at 
which time officers for the year were 
elected. 

Ralph Shure, '32, one of Maryland's 
cross country and track stars, was elected 
president, with Samuel L. Silber, '35, a 
football and lacrosse ace who was all- 
America in the stick pastime in 1934 and 
1935, as vice president. Silber also was 
chairman of the dinner committee, all of 
whom deserve a vote of thanks for a. real 
job. 

Albert Bogley Heagy, secretary; Dr. 
John E. (Jack) Faber. treasurer, and 
the writer, historian, were retained in 
those offices. 

To Faber and Krouse 

Faber and William (Big Bill) Krouse. 
varsity wrestling coach, were presented 
silver services in recognition of their out- 
standing work. Krouse responded the 
next day by beating Navy for the first 
time in history. 

Sports representatives chosen at the 
business meeting are: Football — Jess 
Krajcovic; Baseball — Lieb McDonald; 
Basketball — George Knepley ; Lacrosse — 
Bob Nielson; Track — Earl Thomson; 
Boxing — John Cordyack; Cross Country 
—Chester Ward; Tennis— J. R. McCool; 
Soccer — Jim Belt; Wrestling — R. E. Mar- 
sheck ; Golf — Richard Sturgis. 

Representatives at large are: W. B. 
Clemson and Charley Ellinger, Baltimore; 
Bernie Ulman, Towson; Joe Deckman, 
Gene Kinney and R. C. Schmidt of Wash- 
ington, and Bo James of Silver Spring. 



/ C35, 




KeATE 



"I'm taking up an office collection! I'm col- 
lecting employees that are supposed to be work- 
ing in my office !" 



Jf ulUr & b'8lf)ert 

INCORPORATED 



S \JPPLY\NG 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
HEED 

Since 1920 



Phone— EXecutive 3-8120 

81 5 TENTH STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



9 



A 



i% 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



ENJOY OUR DELICIOUS FOOD 

PIZZA 

Our Specialty 
1837 M. STREET. N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Off Connecticut Avenue 



JAFFE 

• PAPERING 

• PAINTING 

• HOUSE REPAIRS 

METROPOLITAN 8-2460 



911 13th St. N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



51] 



R. MARS 

THE CONTRACT 
CO. 

Wholesale 

• Furniture • Carpets 

• Linens 

• Electrical Appliances 

For information on how YOU can 

shop here, write to 

L. R. MITCHELL, or phone 

Lincoln 4-6900 

410 FIRST ST., S.E. 

Washington, D. C. 



Washington 

It's never too early, or too 
late to begin to save . . . Habits 
of thrift formed today could 
mean the difference between 
success and failure for you in 
the years ahead. 

Determine NOW to save a 
part of all you receive, and 
have funds in reserve when 
you need them most. 

District 7-2370 

FIRST F€D€RflL 
SflVIDGS^nflSST) 

610 13th St., N.W, (bet. F & G) 



USE THIS COUPON 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS b LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of WASHINGTON 
610 13th Street, N.W. (bet. F G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 

Inclosed is check for $ 

to open a Savings Account . . . OR — 
Please send information about Savings 
Service □ 

Street Phone 

City State 





FOOTBALL 




1953 Schedule Complete 
UCLA Opponent in '54 

aryland will go to the 
West Coast in 1954 for 
the first time in history to 
play U.C.L.A. on Oct. 1. 

The game in Los An- 
geles is the first of a two- 
year home - and - home 
agreement with U.C.L.A. 
The date of the return game in College 
Park has not been decided. 

The '54 game in Los Angeles' Coliseum 
will be a Friday night event and may be 
aired over a nationwide television hookup. 
Maryland's Head Coach, Jim Tatum, 
and Coach Red Sanders of U.C.L.A. 
worked out the new series while they were 
assistants of the College All Stars against 
the Professional Los Angeles Rams in 
Chicago last summer and in the North- 
South game in Miami Christmas night. 

It will be the third time Tatum and 
Sanders have been on opposite benches. 
When Sanders coached at Vanderbilt, Ta- 
tum beat him with Maryland in 1947, 20-6, 
and lost to him the next season, 34-0. 

This year's schedule ('53) has been com- 
pleted and is as follows: 

Sept. 12 — Missouri 

* Sept. 26 — Washington and Lee 
Oct. 3 — Clemson 

* Oct. 10 — Georgia 

Oct. 17 — North Carolina 
Oct. 23— Miami 

* Oct. 31— South Carolina 
Nov. 7 — George Washington 

* Nov. 14 — Mississippi 

* Nov. 21 — Alabama 



* Home Games at College Park. 

Terps Star for South 

Maryland's Jack Scarbath was voted the 
outstanding player for the South in the 
Shrine's annual North-South football con- 
test which ended in a 21 to 21 tie at 
Miami. 

Professional football scouts drooled all 
over the sidelines as Scarbath went 95 
yards for a touchdown, played brilliant 
ball throughout and, as a climax, threw a 
64 yard skyscraper pass to Missouri's Jim 
Hook for the tie score. 

Dick Modzelewski and John Alderton 
also received votes in the outstanding 
player poll. 

Tom Cosgrove, Maryland's center, 
turned in his usual perfect job. Alderton 
played a stand out game, as did Modze- 
lewski. 

In the South 28 to 7 victory over the 
North, the annual Blue-Gray game at 
Montgomery, Alabama, Maryland's Lloyd 
Colteryahn, lined up with the winning 
Dixie combination. 



North Wins 

Not so lucky were Scarbath and his 
Dixie associates in the North-South Senior 
game at Mobile, the North, paced by Bos- 
ton's ex-marine, Harry Agganis, won 
easily, 28-13. 

The South was completely outclassed 
until the last half when it pushed across 
two touchdowns. 

Scarbath had a bad day of it. He was 
trapped behind the Southern lines for a 
safety and also lost the ball on a fumbled 
handoff. 

Terps in the lineup in addition to Scar- 
bath were Cosgrove, Colteryahn and Mod- 
zelewski. 

The game made pros of the participants. 
$500 to the winning team members, $400 
to the losers. 

With Service Champs 
Five former Maryland players were in 
the line-up of the Boiling Air Base team 
as the D. C. Airmen won the All-Service 
title in the Poinsettia Bowl at San Diego, 
Cal., defeating the San Diego Naval Train- 
ing Center team, 35-14. 

Erstwhile Terps with the All-Service 
champions are Elmer YVingate, Pete Augs- 
burger, Roy Martine, Paul Lindsay and 
John Troha. 

The Boiling Field squad was good 
enough to take the Syracuse Orange Bowl 
team and also defeated the redoubtable 
Quantico Marines. 

High Praise for Jim 
Vice-President James W. Stevens '19 
Ag., of the Terrapin Club, was Chairman 
of the dinner held in Baltimore in honor 
of Maryland's Head Football Coach and 
Director of Athletics, Jim Tatum. Mr. 
Stevens said, "In doing honor to Jim 
Tatum, we, of the Terrapin Club honor 
ourselves. In the annals of sports, Jim 
Tatum's name shines with the lustre of 
fabulous achievements that contribute to 
the lasting glory of our Alma Mater. In 
the annals of the University of Maryland, 
no chapter is brighter than the one written 
by Jim Tatum's complete devotion and 
singular accomplishment. In the record 
which is made on human hearts by a 
man's high aspiration, audacious effort 
and brilliant success, Jim Tatum has traced 
an indelible chart of great love and great 
triumph, both unforgetable. We are hon- 
ored to pay him tribute." 

Elias at Purdue 

Purdue University has grabbed off Bill 
Elias, Richmond (Ind.) High School's 
highly successful football coach, who 
played his college football at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Elias has been hired as an assistant 
to Head Coach Stu Holcomb. His Rich- 
mond football teams scored 22 consecu- 
tive victories. 



52' 




CO-CAPTAINS FOR '53 

Quarterback Bernie Faloney, left, and Tackle 
Bob Morgan, right, were elected co-captains for 
the 1953 Terrapin football team. 



Terps Top Choices 

"My Maryland" could have easily been 
the theme song for the annual National 
Footbajl League draft meeting. 

Led by All-Americas Jack Scarbath and 
Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, eight 
Terps were named in the first 10 rounds, 
and its doubtful if any school ever so 
greatly dominated the early pro choices. 

Scarbath and Modzelewski remain close 
to College Park with the Redskins, so 
does end Lou Wiedensaul. Ends Lloyd 
Colteryahn and John Alderton join the 
Pittsburgh Steclers. 

Ed Fullerton, co-captain and fine offen- 
sive and defensive man, was grabbed by 
the San Francisco 49'ers. Tackle Stan 
Jones was picked by the Chicago Bears, 
and tackle Francis "Blubber" Morgan was 
snatched by the Los Angeles Rams. 

Morgan, co-captain elect, still has a 
year to go at Maryland and so does Jones. 

In addition to this impressive list, three 
of the 1952 Mary landers were drafted last 
year by the eager pros who were willing 
to wait a year for them. 

Center Tom Cosgrove and guard Bill 
Maletzky are the property of the Cleve- 
land Browns, and the Chicago Bears laid 
an earlj- claim to the services of end 
Paid Nestor. 

Thus all of Maryland's first four ends 
may be playing pro football next fall. 

Baltimore Freshmen 

Five varsity football prospects, all from 
Baltimore, have matriculated at Maryland. 

Backfield Coach Tommy Mont said, 
"The past season produced the best foot- 
ball players I have ever seen in the State." 

The players are Fred Petrela, 6-foot, 
200-pound quarterback from Baltimore 
Polytechnic High; Howard Dare, a 6-foot, 
180-pound halfback, also from Poly; Leon 
Zlotowitz, 6-foot, 3-inch, 230-pound tac- 
kle, and Grafton Crawford, 6-foot, 2-inch, 
210-pound tackle, from Forest Park High 
School, and Bob Morgan, 6-foot, 185-pound 
end from Patterson Park. 

"Petrela is a fine player, one of the best 
I've ever seen in Baltimore," said Mary- 
land's Ail-American quarterback Scarbath. 

Mont added, "There are still many fine 
high school football players in the State 
who will not graduate until June." 

"Many of them have told us they're 



rftevayt 7*zcU TVdt 



BEST 

DEALS 

EVER 



AT 



WHEELER 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH DEALER 



INC. 



HOME of the WHEELMOBILE 
Useful ONE-OWNER CARS 



ENTIRE 4800 BLOCK WISCONSIN AVE. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



N.W. 




J ropertu I / jc 



anaaemeni 

Place your property under professional management 

41 years' experience in every phase of real estate is your assurance 
that we are equipped to render a profitable, prompt and efficient service 
to you on every detail of your property management. 

Procuring selected tenants, proper and consistent control of expendi- 
tures, maintenance of property at lowest costs; periodic inspection of 
property, collecting rents, paying taxes and many other details attending 
professional management. 

W. C. AND A. N. MILLER 

DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 
Builders and Developers of Wesley Heights, Sumner, and Spring Valley 
4872 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., WASHINGTON 16, D. C. EM. 2-4464 



Serving the 

FINEST MEATS & POULTRY 

To Hotels - Clubs - Colleges 

SOUTHERN 

HOTEL SUPPLY COMPANY 

LINCOLN 7-8275 



4th & Morse Street, N.E. 



Washington, D.C. 



WASHINGTON WOODWORKING 
COMPANY, INC. 

"Tailors of the Woodworking Industry" 
CUSTOM MADE 

BOOKCASES PANELLING PARTITIONS 

STORE FIXTURES DISPLAY CASES 

CABINETS FOR HOME, OFFICE, INSTITUTIONS 

FURNITURE TO SPECIFICATIONS 

PHONE: NAtional 8-5624 

912 — 4th STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 




[53; 



MU. 281 



SA. 9366 



w 



a r i a 6 

MARIA ALLORI, Prop. 

Serving Baltimore's 
Finest Italian Cuisine 



• Open for Lunch 

• Closed Monday 

• Service 1 1 A.M. to 4 A.M. 

Private Leisure Lounge 

300 Albemarle St. Balto., Md. 



PLaza 4821 

BLUMENTHAL-KAHN 
ELECTRIC CO., INC 

Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures 

43 S. LIBERTY STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



B. & B. Exterminators, Inc. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

Black Eagle Products 

Phones: LExington 2140-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Specialties 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. Howard Street 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, INC. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 1990 BALTO., MD. 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore, Md. 




planning to enroll at College Park next 
fall,'' Mont concluded. 

Included on the list are Montgomery 
Blair's tackles Moose Turner, Allan Freaa 
and Ralph Ward, and North western's Cen- 
ter Bob Dorse v. 



BASKETBALL 



aryland's basketball team 
kept the ball away from 
West Virginia's 85-point- 
a-game offense and upset 
the Mountaineers. 52-45. 
It was the first loss for 
West Virginia in four 
starts. 
The Mountaineers scored only four field 
goals in the first quarter and a meager pair 
in the second period. The Terps main- 
tained control of the ball, mainly through 
their hustle and command of the back- 
boards. 

Gene Shue, ace Maryland forward, led 
the scoring, hitting for 18 points. Most of 
them swished on set shots from the corner. 
Ralph Greco gave Maryland a 12-11 lead 
one minute after the second period started. 
Maryland never relinquished it. 

The Terps' 23-18 halftime lead was cut 
to 36-33 as the final period began. Once 
again Greco came to Maryland's rescue. 
This time with two field goals in less than 
30 seconds. 

With four minutes to play, West Vir- 
ginia came within four points of tying 
Maryland. 41-37, as Eddie Decker and 
Ralph Holmes began to score on long, one- 
handed shots. 

At this point, Maryland's Don Moran, 
who was having a tough time during most 
of the games slammed in two baskets and 
added a free throw as Shue tossed a field 
goal. Maryland then had a safe 48-36 lead 
with less than three minutes to play. 

In a preliminary game the unbeaten 
Maryland freshmen defeated Bullis Prep, 
60-40. It was the baby Terps' third win. 

Maryland 54; VMI 37 

The Terps put up an airtight defense 
against V.M.I, and came off with their 
third straight Southern Conference victory, 
54-37. 

While the Terps were keeping the Key- 
dets out of shooting range, particularly 
after the first quarter, Maryland's posses- 
sion game gradually wore down the V.M.I. 
defense and provided the Marylanders 
with easy shots. 

V.M.I, made it an interesting game for 
a half and actually held a 13-9 lead after 
the first period, but Maryland took charge 
after that and held a 21-18 lead at half- 
time. 

The Terps' most consistent scorer was 
Gene Shue, who tallied 17 points. Don 
Moran poured in 12 points to help Mary- 
land with its win. 

Maryland 58; W & L 40 

Maryland made it four straight Southern 
Conference victories by defeating Wash- 
ington and Lee, 58-40. 

The Terps never trailed as they out- 
classed the Generals. 

With Shue and Moran showing the way, 



Maryland jumped to a quick lead and 
coasted home. 

The deliberate Terp offense kept the 
ball away from W & L most of the night 
while the Terps shot only when goals 
seemed certain. 

Maryland also took command of the 
backboards, gathering more than 75 per- 
cent of the rebounds. 

Moran was Maryland's high scorer with 
18 points, while Shue scored 14. 

N. Corolino 59; Maryland 49 

North Carolina defeated Maryland at 
Chapel Hill. 59-49. 

Don Moran, Gene Shue and George 
M.inis led a charge which brought Mary- 
land to within two points of the Tar 
Heels in the fourth period, but receded 
from there to the finish. 

Maryland 59; Virginia 56 

Maryland staved off a last ditch Vir- 
ginia rally to whip the Cavaliers. 59-56. 

The Terps, behind only once in the 
game, but never ahead by more than 11 
points, led by 8 going into the final period. 
The Cavaliers shaved the lead to one 
point, 57-56. with little more than a min- 
ute remaining. 

Gene Shue provided Maryland two in- 
surance points when he sank a layup with 
35 seconds remaining, and climaxed his 
scoring with 20 points, highest for the 
game. 

Maryland 63; Richmond 60 

Gene Shue, Maryland's sharpshooting 
forward, flipped in two quick layups in an 
overtime period to enable Maryland to 
defeat Richmond 63-60. 

Shue's 32 points set a new Maryland 
scoring record. The old mark was 30, set 
in 1932. 

Shue almost single-handedly showed 
Maryland the way to its fifth conference 
victory to go with one setback. With 
Richmond leading 57-55, it was Shue who 
dropped in the goal in the last four 
seconds that dead-locked the score at 57-all 
and sent the tussle into overtime. 

The Terp forward sank 12 field goals 
and added eight foul conversions for his 
32 point total. 

Georgetown 54; Maryland 45 

Georgetown, which hadn't led since the 
early moments of the second quarter, 
finished with a rush to defeat Maryland, 
54-45. 

Lou Ciigante hit on a jump shot with 
three and one-half minutes remaining to 
give the Hoyas their first lead since they 
were ahead, 16-14, at the start of the 
second period. 

Gigante's basket made the score, 46-45, 
and the Hoyas added six fouls and one 
basket after that as the Terps had to use 
rougher tactics in trying to regain posses- 
sion of the ball. 

Gene Shue was high for the Terps and 
for the game with 27 points. 

Georgetown played Maryland's posses- 
sion type game until the halfway mark of 
the second period when the Hoyas broke 
into a fast break. The Hoyas trailed, 25-18, 
when they decided to make the change 
and it earned them the halftime tie. 

In the third period Maryland gained 
the opening tap, worked the ball for two 



54] 



and a half minutes and then Don Moran 
hit on a short push shot. Hekker came 
back to tie the score on a layup but it 
was Maryland in front, 40-36, at the 
period's end. 

In the freshman preliminary game, the 
Terps handed the Hoyas a 71-66 beating. 
John Salvador was high for the Terps and 
game with 20 points. 

Maryland 65; VPI 46 

Maryland handed Virginia Tech its 
seventh loss in as many tries and wrapped 
up the game with a 65-46 margin. 

It was Maryland's eighth win in eleven 
games and sixth victory in seven confer- 
ence games. 

A crowd of 1.500 fans watched V.P.I. 
outscore the Terps, 19-16, in the second 
quarter to tie the game at the half. V.P.I, 
also took the lead again early in the 
third period, before giving way to the 
Terps and Maryland's scoring ace. Gene 
Shue. 

Shue broke his own scoring record for a 
season. His 24 points raised his season 
total to 226, four more than lie scored in 
21 games as a sophomore last year. 

Maryland 68; No. Carolina 67 

It was Maryland 68-67 over North Caro- 
lina, knocking the Tar Heels out of the 
Southern Conference lead, and avenging an 
earlier 59-49 defeat. 

Carolina led, 14-13. at the end of a see- 
saw first period. After Maryland pulled 
away to a 26-19 lead in the second quarter, 
North Carolina scored eight straight points 
and trailed only 29-27 at halftime. 

Maryland appeared to be home with a 
47-39 third quarter lead, but the Tar Heels 
dropped their zone defense and applied 
the press in the fourth quarter and began 
to close the gap and Carolina pulled to 
54-53. 

Maryland then took a five point advan- 
tage, but Carolina moved to within one 
point, 64-63. 

A foul shot by the Terp's Gene Shue 
made the score 65-63 and Moe Levin made 
a free throw to make it 66-63. 

The Tar Heels came back to 66-65, but 
on two plays within five seconds Don 
Moran drew two fouls, each time making 
one shot to bring the score to 68-66. 
Likins' foul ended the scoring at 68-67. 

Don Moran led the scoring for the Terps 
and the game, edging Maryland's high 
scoring ace, Gene Shue, 22 to 19. Shue, 
nevertheless, had an excellent night, when 
Carolina applied a full court press. 

In the preliminary game. Fort Myer's 
Tommy O'Keefe relinquished individual 
scoring honors to Bob Kessler of the Mary- 
land Frosh, but Fort Myer won, 75-64. 
Kessler tossed in 23 points to 18 for 
O'Keefe. 

Between Halves 

A classic example of getting your sports 
mixed took place at half-time featuring a 
roller skating exhibition by a former box- 
ing mascot. 

Miss Clay Keene Bernard, and dance 
partner Rusty Miller skated their inter- 
pretation of Ray Martin's "Blue Violins ". 

Miss Bernard, then known as "YVinkie". 
was boxing mascot for '37, '38. '39. and '40 
Terp ring teams. 

The Bernard-Miller duo is a bronze 



commercial and 
residential installations 
asphalt . . . rubber . . . 
cork and plastic tiling 
carpeting and rugs 
linoleums 



0fc SPEc '^ 







W. M. Patterson Company 

2101 NORTH CHARLES STREET 



BALTIMORE 18, MARYLAND 



BELMONT 7430 



The 
WALKER-HASSLINGER 

RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

SERVING FINE FOODS FOR OVER HALF CENTURY 

1701-05 N. Charles St., Baltimore 

Closed Mondays Near Penn. Station 



Open noon 'til II p.m. 



VE 9410 




B»sw 



BRASS & COPPER SUPPLU CO., 

BRASS and COPPER PRODUCTS 



PHONE: LExington 4181 



109-11 Cheapside 



Baltimore 1, Md. 



TIRES 



FIRESTONE 



LANVALE 



McCREARY 

M9CREARY 

I T l Built for L on.yer Sen ice"\ 

I I TIRES VULCANIZING, Inc. 

RECAPPERS - RETREADERS SINCE 1919 
DRIVE-IN SERVICE ROAD SERVICE 

2302-6 N. HOWARD ST. HO. 4880 BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE • BALTO. 13, MD. • BRoadway 1600 

(near intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



TORO'S 76" 

Professional Power Mower 

Used on Maryland's Campus 

and Many Other State and 

County Institutions 




COMPLETE LAWN & 

MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT 

From 18" to 76" 

CALL FOR DEMONSTRATION 
AUTHORIZED SERVICE DEPT. 

JUniper 7-7800 

NATIONAL 
CAPITAL TORO, Inc. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 




A Sign 

In Silver Spring 

This sign marks the 
location of the best 
in banking service. 



Drive-In Banking 
Service 

JU. 9-9000 



8701 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 




The Perfect 
Gift . . . 

YOUR PORTRAIT 

by 




PORTRAIT & COMMERCIAL 

Custom Picture Framing 

STUDIO— 914 THAYER AVE. 

JU. 9-1517 - Silver Spring 



medal dance team. Miss Bernard is a stu- 
dent at Holton-Arms. Miller, a qualified 
civilian flyer is a corporal in the Air Force 
soon to be recalled to duty for cadet 
flight training in Texas. 

G. W. 63; Maryland 62 

Maryland's basketball team, ranked sec- 
ond nationally in defense, held the high 
scoring Colonials of G.W. to 52 points in 
a regulation contest, but succumbed in 
two overtime periods, 63-62. It was a 
heartbreaker to lose — just barely to lose. 

The Terp's deliberate tactics slowed 
G.W.'s race horses to a trot, but in the 
end, a free throw by a sophomore substi- 
tute, Ed Catino, with four seconds re- 
maining, gave the verdict to the Colonials. 

Maryland led 22-13 midway in the sec- 
ond period, but the Colonials continued 
to peck away at the Maryland lead, and 
with 11 seconds left in regulation play, 
Buzz Cirello looped in a set shot to pull 
the Colonials even at 52-52. 

The two teams came out even in a 
game of cat-and-mouse during the first 
overtime, 56-all. 

In the second overtime, Joe Holup 
dropped in a free throw to give the Colo- 
nials the jump. 57-56. Gene Shue and 
Ralph Grecco, Maryland mainstays, fouled 
out to put the Terps under a definite han- 
dicap. The Terps pulled even at 58-58, 
but a set shot by Catino followed by free 
throws by Walt Devlin and Catino, again 
put G.W. ahead. 

Catino's last foul toss made it 63-60, 
with four seconds left. Dilworth of Mary- 
land brought the ball up-court, fired an 
underhand layup as the buzzer sounded, 
but a foul caused him to over shoot. He 
connected on his two free tosses, but the 
game was already over. 

Maryland had command of the game in 
the first three quarters, and it appeared 
that the Terps were on their way to their 
first win over G.W. since 1947. 

Don Moran and Morris Levin, a couple 
of underrated Maryland seniors, were bot- 
tling up Joe and John Holup, G.W.'s famed 
scoring twins. Joe was shut out from the 
floor until the fourth quarter, and had to 
do a one-man job under the boards, be- 
cause Brother John and Walt Devlin, 
G.W.'s usual rebound artist, were off form. 

Morylond 70; V. P. I. 56 

Maryland's Terps went on a second 
period scoring spree to produce all but 
three points of their eventual winning 
margin to trim Virginia Tech, 70-56. 

The Gobblers stayed even with Mary- 
land for the first quarter, and trailed by 
only one point at the end of the period. 

Marjdand had trouble with V.P.I. 's zone 
defense in the opening stanza, but the 
Gobblers' scoring pace fell off in the sec- 
ond period and Maryland went on to open 
up a 39-27 halftime lead. 

The Techmen matched Maryland point 
for point again in the third quarter, but 
early in the final period the Terps turned 
on the heat and won going away. 

Don Moran set the scoring pace for the 
winners with 18 points, Gene Shue added 
15 and Moe Levin dropped in 13. 

Richmond 49; Maryland 46 

The Richmond Spiders scored their 
ninth straight triumph by wringing from 
the Terrapins a 49-46 victory. 



The Spiders, the surprise team of the 
Conference took Maryland at the Terps' 
own deliberate game, building up a lead 
in the second period and out-delayed 
Maryland in the late stages. 

Leader of the Spiders was Walter 
Lysaght, a 6-foot, 5-inch freshman who 
played last season with the Quantico Ma- 
rines. Lysaght scored 14 points and was 
the top rebounder of the night. 

With one minute left in the game, the 
Terps pulled up to 47-46. A one-handed 
shot by Gene Shue and a tap-in by Bob 
Everett pulled Maryland to within one 
point. 

Here, however, Richmond froze the ball. 
Two points were added to the final score 
when Shue fouled Warren Mills. 

Maryland 67; V.M.I. 41 

Coach Bud Millikan's lads defeated Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, 67-41, despite the 
fact that Gene Shue, leading scorer, made 
only seven points. 

However the Terps got a lift from Don 
Moran, whose 16 points were tops for the 
second straight game. Ralph Greco, sub- 
stitute guard, was runnerup with 11. 

Facing virtually the same zone that had 
stymied them against Richmond, the 
Terps had better luck in hitting from the 
outside and driving in. 

The Millikanmen were never headed 
after the middle of the first period as they 
ballooned a 7-6 lead to 30-15 margin at 
half time. Forward Don Moran and Guard 
Ronnie Brooks scored 8 and 6 points re- 
spectively during this drive. 

In the final period, the Terps, their line- 
up sprinkled with substitutes, tossed in 
29 points for their highest scoring period 
of the game. 

Maryland 79; W&M 57 

Gene Shue flipped in 34 points here to 
lead the Terps to a 79-57 victory over Wil- 
liam and Mary in a Southern conference 
basketball game. The triumph assured 
Maiyland of a conference tournament 
berth. 

The Indian squad struggled to a 16-16 
tie at the end of the first period, but faded 
(Concluded on page 61) 



BOXING 



Maryland 4; Syracuse 4 

aryland's mitmen came 
home joint Sugar Bowl 
trophy winners after a 
hectic tit-tat-toe 4-4 draw 
with a power-packed 
Syracuse boxing team, 
Eastern Intercollegiate 
Champions. There were 

those at the ringside who thought the 

Terps won. 

The Frank Cronin-coached College 

Parkers opened with a convincing win 

when little Gary Garber in his first bout 

for Maryland, took the 125 pound bout 

from Tom Coulter. 

At 132 Jackie "Snorky'Letzer won for 

Maryland over Art Nelson, the aggressive 

Letzer taking all three frames. 

It was one of those that "could have 

gone either way" when Syracuse's John 

Granger was awarded the nod over Mary- 




56 



land's flashy Gary Fisher at 139. Some 
thought Fisher won this. 

The show stealer came at 147 when 
Bob Theofield, Maryland's belter from 
Beltsville. out punched Larry O'Sullivan, 
power hitter from Syracuse. Theofield 
won clearly enough. One of his solid 
punches dropped O'Sullivan for a clean 
knockdown. 

At 156 Maryland's Davey Lewis, who 
used to box for the 1947 Trips as a 16 year 
old 125 pounder, lost to Ed Martin. Syra- 
cuse. It was close. Lewis, back after two 
terms in the Army and rugged duty in 
Korea, was in the way. 

At 165 Texas Ronnie Rhodes, the Terp's 
Southern champion, lost the nod to Bill 
Miller, rugged, rushing Syracuse star. 
Rhodes turned in some excellent counter 
punch boxing. Some "neutrals" thought 
he won. Others thought a draw would have 
been fair. 



The 


Score by Rounds 


Syr. 


10 10 9=29 


Md. 


8 10 10=28 






Vincent Rigoloso, experienced Syracuse 
175 pounder, won from Maryland's Davey 
Ortel in the tatter's varsity debut. 

With the Orangemen ahead, 4 to 3, Cal 
Quenstedt, Terp heavy, made it even- 
Stephen by handily taking the measure 
of Syracuse's Wilson Winne3 r . 

The show was refereed by Chuck Davey, 
former Michigan State four-time cham- 
pion. 

So. Carolina 5; Maryland 4 

One of "those close decisions," in favor 
of Allan George, South Carolina's 125 
pounder, over Maryland's Guido Capri. 
was the deciding factor in the Gamecock's 
5 to 4 win over the Terps. 

At 119, Maryland's former All- Army 
champ, Gary Garber, defeated Johnny 
Stokes. The Terps received their second 
setback of the night as Jackie Letzer of 
Maryland was defeated by Andy Sciambra 
at 130. 

The 139 pound bout went to Chuck 
Davis, South Carolina over Gary Fischer, 
while at 147 pounds Bob Theofield of 
Maryland was stopped in the second round 
by Emmitt Gurney. 

Russell Eddy, Maryland, 156, was 
stopped in the third round by Malcolm 
Dewitt. The remaining three classes of 
165, 178 and heavyweight were won by 
Maryland as Ronnie Rhodes handily de- 
feated Jack Cassidy, Bill Mclnnis took 
Haywood Davis and Cal Quenstedt won 
on a forfeit. 



Syracuse 5; Maryland 3 

At Syracuse, Maryland was nosed out 
by the Orangemen, 5 to 3. 

At 125 Maryland's Gary Garber lost 
the decision to Tom Coulter. 

At 132 Terp Jackie Letzer won from Art 
Nelson. 

Maryland's Gary Fisher, 139, lost to 
Jim Granger, Eastern Intercollegiate 
champ. 

At 147 Bob Theofield won for Mary- 
land over Larry O'Sullivan. 

Davy Lewis, Maiyland, lost to Ed Mar- 
tin at 155. 



TIMBER 

IS A 

CROP 




The Harvest 

is 

HOMES 



GOOD LUMBER PROPERLY USED NEVER FAILS! 

SILVER SPRING 
III I LD1 \<p SUPPLY CO. 



Established 1922 



LUMBER 



MILLWORK 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 



Georgia Avenue and Ripley Street 
Silver Spring, Md. 




Get Acquainted with . . . 

QUAINT ACRES NURSERY 

ON THE COLESVILLE PIKE (U.S. 29) 

Complete Line of Nursery Stock in Wide Variety 
and Landscape Service 

TREE MOVING PRUNING TRANSPLANTING 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

5 Miles from Georgia Ave. 

JUniper 9-5810 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



The Citizens Bank of Takoma Park 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Takoma Park, Maryland 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE . . . "3ined 3o J Service" 

MONROE ^ p S B fr COMPANY 

1237 East West Hgwy. ^5^41^ Silver s P rin 9' Md - 



Clarke Instruments 

Div. of 
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MACHINE SHOPS, INC. 

Design • Development • Manufacturing 
Electronic Instruments 



919 JESUP BLAIR DRIVE 



SILVER SPRING, MD. 



[57: 



HELSING 
BROTHERS 

INCORPORATED 



PAVING 
CONTRACTORS 



4207 - 39th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C. 



EMerson 2-2231 



William F. Nelson 
BRICK WORK 

Phone: TUckerman 2-2290 

3817 - 14th Street, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food ■ 

FREE INSPECTION 

WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

MEtropolitan 8-1520 

1023 12th St., N.W. Washington 



Maryland's Ronnie Rhodes dropped a 
decision to Bill Miller. 

Terrapin 175 pounder Bill Mclnnis lost 
to Vince Rigolosi. 

Cal Quenstedt, Maryland heavy, won 
from Bill Winner. 

The decisions met with considerable 
audience disapproval while the wire serv- 
ices and the Syracuse local newspaper re- 
ferred to the officiating as "weird". 

Press box opinion was that Referee 
Lou Ritzie, making his debut as third 
man, erred in awarding the 132 and 147 
pound bouts to Maryland, and the 125, 
155 and 165 to SjTacuse. 

Maryland 4'/ 2 ; Penn State 3 Vi 

Gary Garber, Maryland's diminutive 
former All-Army champion, unlimbered 
too much speed and fire power for Penn 
Stale's Sam Marino. 125 Eastern Inter- 
collegiate champ, as Coach Frank Cronin's 
truculent Terps took a 4% to 3% win 
over the Nittany Lions. 

At 165 Ronnie Rhodes, classy Mary- 
land boxer from Abilene, Texas, last year's 
all-South champion, also had too much 
artillery for State's Dick Cameron, stop- 
ping the latter in round three. 

Jackie Letzer. at 132. turned in a con- 
vincing win for the Terps by taking all 
three rounds from Sammy Butler. Let- 
zer scored a clean knockdown in the 
third. 

Maryland's Russell Eddy, at 147 who, 
not too many years ago, was boxing in 
juvenile exhibitions at College Park, out- 
boxed and outpunched State's Sam Engle. 

In the unlimited class Maryland's un- 
beaten Cal Quenstedt sustained a lacera- 
tion over the eye in round one against 
Bill Arnold. The bout was stopped and, 
under NCAA rules, was a draw. 

At 178 State's Adam Kois decisioned 
Maryland's Bill Mclnnis. 

Maryland's Davey Lewis, at 155, in a 
punching bee which took a lot out of both 
boys, lost the nod to Henry Arnold. It 
was a close one. 

Gary Fisher, for Maryland at 139, was 
outboxed by Penn State's Tony Fiore 
after an interesting three rounds. 

Joe Bunsa, CUA, was referee. 

Maryland 7; Citadel 1 

In their home debut Maryland's Cronin- 
clouters made it easy to believe that some 
of the arbiting they encountered on the 
road must have been, in spots, slightly 
camembertian, as they took the Citadel 
7 to 1. 

Friday, the 13th, was a bad day for the 
Terps' Ronnie Rhodes, 165. He dropped 
the only nod for Maryland by walking 
into a punch from Don Shriner in round 
one. It was clean and dropped Rhodes 
convincingly. It cost him the round by a 
wide margin. The second was even. The 
thud was Rhodes by a country mile with 
Shriner helpless and badly beaten. But 
that round one was there on the score card 
and not enough time to square it. 

Maryland's Gary Garber, 125, every inch 
the All-Army and AAU champ he was 
sewed buttons all over Ken Pearce, wing- 
ing double left hooks a la Nedomatsky '37 
to stop Pearce in two. 

Terp Jackie Letzer, 130, had too many 
port batteries for Bill Gasque, the Mary- 
land lad winning all three rounds. 




Goofus: "Have you any four-volt, two-watt 
bulbs?" 

Rufus: "For what?" 
Goofus: "No, two." 
Rufus: "Two what?" 
Goofus: "Yeah." 

Maryland's Gary Fisher unwrapped a 
masterful boxing lesson and administered 
to Ralph Rosata at 139. 

Hardpunching switchhitter Bob Theo- 
field, 147 for Maryland, belted it out with 
tough Mike Coppola. The hectic melee 
found Theofield the tougher guy and bet- 
ter puncher. 

Russell Eddy, Terp 156 pounder, had 
too much speed and know-how for Nathan 
Rephan, Eddy winning the nod. 

Billy Mclnnis. at 178, outpunched Cita- 
del's rugged Bryant Johnson. 

In the unlimited class Calvin Quenstedt, 
Terp lefty, picked up another southpaw 
in Charley Harvey. In such a match the 
southpaw with the better right hand wins. 
That was Quenstedt. 

Charley Reynolds, Washington, refereed. 

Cronin's boys have yet to meet Army 
and Michigan State away, South Carolina 
and L.S.TJ. at home. 

Ring Honors 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, former Mary- 
land boxing coach, head of the Univer- 
sity's Department of Publications and 
Publicity, who is also Chairman of the 
District of Columbia Boxing Commission 
as well as Executive Secretary of the 
National Boxing Association, was named 
among the "First Ten Commissioners" in 
the New York Enquirer's Annual ratings. 
It is the tenth time he has been so rated. 



WRESTLING 



aryland's wrestling squad, 
defending Southern Con- 
ference champion, 
opened its season with a 
16-12 victory over West 
Virginia. 

The Mountaineers were 
runners-up in the Confer- 
ence tournament last year. 

The deciding points for Maryland, a 14- 
12 victor over W T est Virginia at their last 
meeting, came on pins by 137 pound Rod- 
ney Norris and 167 pound Ernie Fischer. 
The two defeated Lewis Guidi and Bruce 
Kramer, respectively. 

Mountaineer Captain Don Struble was 
outpointed, 7-5, in the 157 pound class by 
Bob Fischer, brother of Ernie Fischer. 




58' 






West Virginia heavyweight John Bu- 
chanan won a dramatic two point take 
down in the final seconds of his match with 
Maryland's Captain .lack Shanahau. to win 
6-5. 

In the remaining classes. Bob Perry of 
West Virginia defeated Jerome Carroll 6-1, 
at 123 pounds; Bdl Pritchard of West Vir- 
ginia defeated Frank Scarfile 4-0, at 130; 
Tom Diamond of West Virginia decisioned 
Alex Papavasilious 7-2, at 147 and Mary- 
land's Bob Drake defeated Carman Scnsky 
6-0, at 170. 

Maryland 23; N. C. State 10 

Maryland's wrestling team, led by three 
Southern Conference champions, handed 
North Carolina State a 23 to 10 setback. 

The champion brother act of Ernie 
Fischer, 167. and Hob Fischer, 157, boosted 
the scoring with first round pins as did 
Rodney Norris, 137 pound class and the 
third conference champion on the Mary- 
land squad. 

At 123 Alfaro of Maryland decisioned 
Morgan, but at 130 State's Sideris de- 
cisioned Carroll of Maryland. 

In the 147 pound match. Little of Mary- 
land and Taylor grappled to a draw, but 
Bob Drake of Maryland at 177. decisioned 
Kaiser. 

The most spectacular bout came in the 
heavyweight class when State's Leone used 
a body press to pin Carl Everly of Mary- 
land in 59 seconds. 

Maryland 15; Navy 11 

For the first time in history, Coach Sully 
Krouse's Terp wrestling team won from 
Navy when the Terps' Bob Drake, a sub- 
stitute heavyweight decisioned Norm Bis- 
sel, Maryland 15; Navy 11. 

Navy surprised by halting Maryland's 
Ernie Fischer, after a sensational 41- 
straight winning streak over three years. 
Fischer was pinned by Navy's Pete Blair 
with a crotch and body press. It was the 
first defeat of Fischer's career. 

Rodney Norris, Bob Drier, Bob Fischer 
and Jack Shanahan scored Maryland's 
other victories, all on decisions. 

Maryland 23; W&L 10 

Maryland's Krouse-coached Conference 
wrestling champions made it four straight 
by downing Washington and Lee, 23-10. 

The Terps' Rod Norris and Bob Drake 
scored their fourth triumphs of the year. 

The summaries : 

123 pounds — John Ellis (W&L) decisioned 
Bobby Rauer, 5-2. 

130 pounds— Rennie Carroll (M) pinned Gordy 
Thomas, 47 seconds. 

137 pounds Rod Norris (M) pinned Sid Kap- 
lan, 2:35. 

147 pounds — Dan Little (M) and Jack Sites 
(W&L) drew, 5-5. 

157 pounds — Gibby McSpadden (W&L) pinned 
Alex Papavasilion, 5:35. 

167 pounds — Ernie Fischer (M) pinned Fred 
Staunton, 8:43. 

177 pounds — Jack Shanahan (M) decisioned 
Bob Maccubbin, 12-0. 

Heavyweight — Bob Drake (M) decisioned 
Chuck Rauh, 6-5. 

Maryland 32; V.M.I. 

Maryland blanked V.M.I. 32 to 0. 

Rodney Norris decisioned Jeff Robert- 
son to make it 42 straight wins. 

Jerry Carroll, 123, took Gus Barclay in 
:1.22. Dick Crowley, 130, pinned Jock 
Wheeler in :1.49. 

Ernie Fischer, 167, flattened Bill Ander- 
son in the second and Jack Shanahan did 
the same to Ed Nowitzky at 177. 



EisEn-mnDERS consTRumon co 



david t. eisen 
william f. magers 



construction contractors 

to the 

university of maryland 

general contractors 
commercial and 
residential 
construction 

145 kennedy st. n.w. 
Washington, d.c. 
TUxedo 2-3838 



WALLOP and SON 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Class of 1919 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, 3rd 
Class of 1942 



• I NSURANCE • 

Fire - Automobile - Life - Accident - Liability - Bonds 

EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 

Suite 405, 1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W. Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON 5, D.C. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WAS H I NGTON 3 , D. C. 

BALTIMORE 1 , M D . 

NORFOLK 10, V A. 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE COMPANY 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

LIMESTONE 
GRANITE MARBLE 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St. N.E. 

Washington 18, D.C. 



g>cf)ratft'$ Chocolates! 

Distributor — 
Edward Zupnik & Sons 

1307 Fourth St., N.E. 
Li. 4-6166 Washington, D.C. 









^*w 



BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

J^zcoms. LzliiaLiku C-onicioiii. 

PLANT: 621-27 G ST., N.W. MEtropolitan 8-2220 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



When patronizing advertisers -please incntion ''Maryland" 



59' 



BALTIMORE 




DON'T GUESS 
GET -* 




qUALITk 



MEATS 




BALTIMORE 



''Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 



TRISTATE 



ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS • SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 



OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 



PESTS? 



"Gall Ik* 



TERMITES: 



(loie Man* 




PEST Control siNCE 1861 



SAratoga 61 18 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



GOEB PRINTING CO. 

347 N. HOLLIDAY ST. 
PLaza 5675 Baltimore 2 



At 147, Little, of Maryland, decisioned 
Brown (VMI) (4-2). 

R. Fisher, Maryland, took Berry (VMI) 
(6-0) at 157. 

Heavyweight Everley, (Md.), decisioned 
Bonnett (VMI) (5-1)." 

The Krousekrushers have yet to face 
North Carolina and Penn State. 

RIFLE 

Maryland continues to be among the 
nation's leading producers of rifle 
teams. This year's story is much the same 
as that of the past few years — -victory. 

The Varsity Rifle Team, participating 
in both intercollegiate competition and 
the Maryland Rifle Civilian League, is 
undefeated. The Rifle Terps have out- 
blasted Western Maryland State College 
by 1435 to 1331, and the United States 
Military Academy by a score of 1437 to 
1414. Most recently on February 7th 
Maryland's Sharpshooters, with a score 
of 1433, bettered VPI 1386, George Wash- 
ington U. 1380 and Georgetown U 1383 
in a four team match fired on the Maiy- 
land rifle range. 

In the Maryland League with the first 
half of the schedule gone, Maryland U. 
remains undefeated, with ten (10) wins 
and no losses. Those ten include wins 
over the best teams in the State, including 
the U.S. Aggies and the Greenbelt Wolves. 
The Freshman Team fired 1100 to 1151 
against their varsity brothers. The Var- 
sity has been State Champs for the past 
two years. 

The high scorer and "Big Gun" for the 
Varsity team is Roy Oster, whose 288.88 
average is something for its teammates to 
shoot at. Oster's highest score for the 
season was a 293 out of a possible 300. 

The Air Force ROTC Rifle Team is 
composed of those members of the Var- 
sity team who are AFROTC Cadets. 
About half the Varsity team are in the 
AFROTC program. 

Last year the AFROTC Team won the 
Air Force Championship Trophy and five 
first-place medals, the trophy for which 
is on display in the main corridor of the 
Armory. 

Maryland posted a score four points 
under its own intercollegiate record to 
beat Navy 1436-1420. Martorano fired a 
292, Savage a 290 as the Terps whipped 
the Middies for the sixth time in the last 





"Now here is an exotic little number at 
$40.00; it is called 'Perhaps'." 

" 'Perhaps'? At forty bucks yet it should be 
'For Danged Sure'!" 



seven years. The 1436 total broke Navy's 
range record of 1432 set last year by the 
Terps. Maryland holds 6 wins in 7 tries 
against Navy. 

The remaining intercollegiate schedule 
for the Varsity is: 

VPI (at Blacksburg)— 28 Feb. '53 

National Intercollegiate Sectional Match 
— 7 Mar. '53 

Univ. of Penn. (at Philadelphia)— 

21 Mar. '53 

Staunton Military Academy (home & 
home)— 28 Mar. '53 

& 18 Apr. '53 

George Washington U. (home & home) 
20 Mar. '53 27 Mar. '53 

M/Sgt. Paul D. Barnes is coach of the 
Maryland Rifle Teams. 



TRACK 



Terps Win at VMI 

aryland trackmen ran off 
with most of the honors 
in the second annual Vir- 
ginia Military Institute 
Winter Relays. 

Coach Jim Kehoe's 
teams placed first in the 
half mile, mile, 2-mile and 
4-mile relays and Maryland's George But- 
ler placed first in his event. 

The Terps wrapped it up with a stirring 
win in the 4-mile relay event, finishing 2 
yards ahead of North Carolina State to 
win in 19:15.2. 

There was no team award. 

Mile Relay — 1, Maryland (Straub, Wilson, 
Smith, Coss) ; 2, Duke; 3, VPI; 4, VMI. Time, 
3:32.4. 

Hurdle Shuttle Relay— 1, Duke ; 2, VPI. Time, 
:32.6. 

Distance Medley— 1, N. C. State (Cook, Span- 
gler, Miller, Garrison) ; 2, Maryland; 3, VMI; 4. 
VPI. Time, 11:11.4. 

Shotput — 1, Durham Lawshe, Duke; 2, Hol- 
land, VPI; 3, Dyson, Maryland; 4, Carter, VMI. 
Distance 48 feet, 10 inches. 

Mason-Dixon Conference Distance Medley — 1, 
Catholic University (Lee, Arient, Favo, 
Schmidt); 2, Roanoke College; 3, Bridgewater. 
Time, 11:24. 

Half-Mile Relay— 1, Maryland (Straub, Nord- 
quist, Jones, Wilson); 2, VPI and Duke; 4, 
VMI. Time, 1 :36.0. 

High Jump— 1, Lankford, VPI; 2. Gaston, 
VPI, and Keintz. Richmond; 4, Alexander, N. C. 
State, Yoder, N. C. State and Shanklex, Duke. 
Height, 6 feet, 2 inches. 

Two-Mile Relay — 1, Maryland (Groad, Faass, 
Goldstein, Thornton) ; 2, VPI; 3, Duke: 4, VMI. 
Time, 8:24.6. 

Sprint Shuttle Relay— 1, VMI (Mapp, Shay, 
Menefee. Honkins) ; 2, Maryland (Waller. Karp, 
Jones, Nordquist) ; 3, N. C. State ; 4, Virginia. 
Time, :26.3. 

Pole Vault — 1, George Butler, Maryland ; 2, 
Roberts, VPI, Diggs, W&L. Grant, CU, and 
Cates, Duke. Height, 12 feet, 3 inches. 

Sprint Medley Relay — 1, VMI (Shay, Svendsen, 
Mapp, Angle) ; 2, Duke ; 3, Maryland ; 4, Catholic 
U. Time 3:43.1. 

Four-Mile Relay — 1, Maryland (McGee, Good, 
Tibbetts. Goldstein); 2, N. C. State; 3, Rich- 
mond; 4, VPI. Time, 19:15.2. 

In Baltimore 

The Terps felt the first major conse- 
quence of rebuilding as they failed to win 
a single first or second place in the Balti- 
more Fifth Regiment Armory Games. 

Maryland's lone third place finish came 
in the One-Mile Relay event against rug- 
ged competition. First place went to the 
Grand Street Boys, consisting of nation- 
ally renowned speedsters, George Rhoden, 
Mai Whitefield, Andy Stanfield and Herb 
McKenley. Morgan State was the only 
college to finish in front of the Terrapins 
in this race. 



601 



BASKETBALL 

(Concluded from page 56) 

quickly as Shue bucketed 10 points in the 
second quarter to push the Millikanites to 
a 36-26 margin at half time. 

Georgetown 49; Maryland 48 

Maryland's basketball team slowed 
Georgetown to a walk but still lost a 49- 
to-48 real hard luck thriller. 

Guard Lou Gigante swished two foul 
shots in the final 25 seconds to insure 
Georgetown victory. 

Gigante's pair of free throws were 
needed. In the last ten seconds Gene Sliue. 
Maryland's scoring ace, connected with a 
field goal which made the final margin 
49 to 48. 

In a hectic last quarter the teams 
swapped basket for basket with never 
more than two points separating them. 

Georgetown led 26-22 at halftime but 
lost the lead five times in the last two 
periods. 

Shue led Millikin's lads with 18 points 
and center Don Moran hit for 14. 

The Terps, qualified for Conference 
Tournament play, have yet to meet Navy 
and George Washington. 



ILLUSTRIOUS ANCESTOR 

How about the newly rich old gal who 
was paying out to a genealogist, who 
pepped her up with all the data he could 
regarding her ancestors. Then he dug up 
Great Uncle Felix who had been executed 
for murder. Not wanting to ruin his rep 
by a false report but quavering in his 
boots lest the income from this particular 
tap should suddenly cease, he reported, 
"Uncle Felix occupied the chair of applied 
electricity in one of New York State's 
leading institutions." 

DEFINITIONS 

Cemetery: — A dead end. 

Cleverness: — Knowing how stupid you 
arc and hiding it. 

Diplomat: — .4 man whose wife respects 
him. 




FIFTY-FIFTY 

Betty: — "Why does the Swiss cabinet have a 
Secretary of the Navy when the Swiss have no 
navy?" 

Bootsie : — "That's easy; for the same reason 
that the Soviet Republic has a Minister of 
Justice". 






KCAMEE-DAVIJ 

Construction Company 

General Building Contractors -**=M 



llchester Rd. 
Ellicott City 
Md. 



Phone: CAronsville 750 




ow to buy a carpet 

Yorkshire will measure the rooms to be carpeted and 
draw a floor plan of these rooms. We bring samples 
of ALL the famous brands and give you an accurate 
price on wall-to-wall carpeting or correctly fitted 
rugs. There is absolutely NO CHARGE for York- 
shire's Extra Services and you are under no obliga- 
tion to buy. 



<»<»<» 




*/ / 



impure 

CARPET HOUSE 



RETAIL 



CONTRACT 



IDIewood 8400 

514 E. BELVEDERE AVENUE • BALTIMORE 12, MD. 



INSTITUTION 
PHYSICIANS' 
SURGEONS' 




HOSPITAL 
NURSES' AND 
LABORATORY 



Murray-Baumgartner Surgical Instrument Co., Inc. 

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

5 and 7 W. CHASE STREET BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

Telephone, SAratoga 7333 



61 



JOHN H. DAVIS 

COMPANY 
* 

Paint Contractor 



Phone Lincoln 3-2337 

1019 G STREET, S.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D.C. 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIPS DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear — 1229 D St., S.E. 
LI. 3-4848 Washington 





Multigraphing 




Multilith 


ng 


Addressing 




Mail 


ng 


Mimeogrc 


phing 






Ace Lette 


r Se 


rvice 




Phone: Na 


8-7927 






1424 K St. N.W. 


Washi 


ngton, D. 


C. 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 

Established 1850 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

District 7-0995 

522 - 1 2th ST., S. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



American Disinfectant- Co. 

Pest Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D.C. NAtional 8-6478 



ECME 



EASY TERMS— TRADE IMS 

Photo-Movie SaDDllea 

• Free Parking 

• Free Catalog 

Open 9 to 6 — Than. 9 to 9 



Brenner 933 penn.Av*.£ 



Opposite Justice Department 
RE. 7-2434 Washington 





In 1863 Gettysburg, Pa., had a lair forbidding discharge of fire arms 



Cowpoke from Texas died. Arriving at 
the eternal gates he looked about and 
opined, "This Heaven looks a lot like 
Texas." 

"You're right and wrong", replied the 
imp tending the gate, "it looks like Texas 
but it ain't heaven". 



These boys from Texas who are called 
"Tex" lohen they're away from Texas. 
Have you ever wondered what they call 
them when they're at home in Texas? A 
young feller from Abilene tells us they're 
called "Bud" or "Podneh". 



Bitsy: — "I'm looking for a husband." 
Betsy: — "But you've got one." 
Bitsy: — "That's the one for whom I'm 
looking." 



"Pardon me. miss." asked the freshman 
"may I have the next dance?" 

"I never dance with a child," snubbed 
Up-Stage Annie. 

"Your pardon." replied the frosh, "I 
didn't realize your condition." 



Rules for playing Moronia. Three 
players are required. They sit down to- 
gether, each with a bottle of Noka Nola. 
They empty their respective bottles. One 
player gets up and leaves. The other two 
then try to guess who left. 

"I don't think we did too bad in that 
English exam." 

"You should have said 'badly' instead 
of 'bad.' " 

"What's tin difference? You know what 
I mean." 

"Oh. there is quite a difference. You 
can look at a coed sternly but you should- 
n't look at her stern. (Or should you?)" 

"How do you mean he was the laziest 
player you ever saw?" 

"Well, he played for Wake Forest but 
he always spelled it with a hyphen in the 
middle, like so: — 

"Wake-Forest" 
so he'd have something on which to sit 
down." 



M.D.: — "Have you kept a chart on his 
progress?" 

Nurse: — "No — but you should read my 
diary." 

Jean: — "Marriage is no good. Snorky 
stopped kissing me right after the cere- 
mony." 

Joan: — -"A poor husband!'' 

Jean: — "Oh, Snorky isn't my husband." 



Feller from Texas t< lis about the great 
dry spell down thar when cattle were 
so thin the cowhands used carbon paper 
and branded 'em in triplicate. 



Journalism student — "Fvc got a real 
news story." 

Prof:— "Man bile a dog?" 

Student: — "No, a bull threw a TV an- 
nouncer." 

Sandy MacTavish. "Here, mon, is the 
last payment of my installments on the 
baby carriage". 

Dealer, "And how is the little baby?" 

Sandy, "Mon, he's fine. He's a junior 
in Agriculture". 



Customer:— "Call the manager! I have 
never met anything as tough as this 
steak!" 

Garcon: — "You will when you meet the 
manager!" 



The Better 6% : — "I gave you the best 
years of my life?" 

Husband : — "And who made them the 
best vears of your life?" 



"What do you mean Gertie Swivelpuss 
won a beauty contest?" 

"She did! Attended the National Mor- 
ticians' Annual Convention and was 
crowned 'Miss Rigor Mortis of 1953!''' 



The plumber's face flushed. Being a 
modern plumber, it flushed silently. 



Q: "Name two ancient sports." 
A: Anthony and Cleopatra." 



Fuddy Duddy: "Sit down in front!" 
Mucilage Addict: "I don't bend that 
way!" 



"Look here", said the felloiv from over 
Salisbury way, complaining to the Post- 
muster, "I've been receiving a lot of 
threatening letters". 

"From whom?", he was asked. 

"Those income tax people", was the 
reply. 

"If this cheese came from Switzerland 
tell me if it was imported or deported!" 



Norwegian left Baltimore at 5 p.m., on 
B. & 0. bound for Washington. Drunk 
left Washington at 5 p.m. on B. & 0. 
bound for Baltimore. Trains arrived on 
time on parallel tracks but the Norwegian 
anil the drunk did not pass each other 
because Norse is Norse and Souse is 
Souse and never their twains shall meet. 



"This room", said the Atlantic City ho- 
tel clerk to the visiting Terp alumnus, 
"overlooks the sea. The other one you 
looked at overlooks the garden. Which do 
you want?" 

"Do you," asked the Terp, "have one 
that overlooks about 80% of the rent?" 



A girl needn't be a golfer just because 
you play a round with her. 



Rose's are red, 
Violet's are blue, 
Jean don't wear any, 
What color do you? 



62 




"This letter from the University. Maw, is 
signed by a feller who sez he's a Phi Delt and 
that he's been a-goin' steady with our Marthy 
now fer seven semesters and that it's reached a 
stage where he wants to come up here to Acci- 
dent to see us." 

"Good gosh. Paw. do you reckon he's aimin' 
to apply to us fer a pension?" 



"Mrs. Snippitone, I came to call on 
your daughtc 

"You get out and stay!" 

"But see this badge? I'm a store de- 
tectivt ." 

"Oh. come right in. I thought it was 
a fraternity pin." 



"I do not care how well the French chef 
prepares frog's legs." said the co-ed, "and 
I do not care whether or not the French 
like them. I shall NOT eat them. We 
are having classes in zoology." 

"There isn't time in life— there isn't time 

To fret about each petty ill or wrong! 

You'll find folks low you better when you 

smile ; 

They do not want your frown, they want 

your song." 

Take-Your-Time Tommy says there's an 
old axiom, "never put off 'til tomorrow 
what you can put off 'til next week!" 



Good friends do not have to advertise 
the fact. 



"Oh, the monotony of this long day," 
said Kenilworth Kate, "by tonight I'll be 
wild." "Can I see you tonight?" asked 
Willie the Wolf. 



Terptopics 

Some men are Ufa 
wheelbarrows 
— stand still unless you 
push 'em . . . All mar- 
ried folks ore no! un- 
happy, only the men . . . 
A firefly glows brightest 
when surroundings are 
darki st . . . Som< minds 
are like concrete, thor- 
oughly mixed and permanently set . . . 
You don't need references to borrow trou- 
ble . . . The train roared into Washington 
terminal, ground to a slowdown and 
stopped with a big jerk. A certain well 
known columnist got off. 








Smoothly Delicious 
and Oil -So 
Refreshing! 

Enjoy it Often! It's Good For You! 

Meadow Gold 

Ice Cream 

Meadow Gold Products, Inc. 

ASK FOR OUR FLAVOR OF THE MONTH 



S. D. MOSES, INC. 

Concrete Construction 



817 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtional 8-8586 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 



ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 
(SCAGLIOLA) 



ARTIFICIAL 
TRAVERTINE STONE 



ARTIFICIAL STONE 
FOR INTERIOR 



STANDARD ART, MARBLE and TILE CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

SCAGLIOLA - MARBLE - MOSAIC - TERRAZZO 
TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 



I 117 D STREET, NORTHWEST 



WASHINGTON 1, D. C. § 



Telephone NAtional 8-7413 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT Cr SUPPLY CO., Inc. 



Link Belt Company 
Power Transmission i 

Supplies 
1244 NINTH STREET N.W. 



"Pyrene" & 
"C-O-TWO" i 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 1, D.C. 



"MSA" Industrial 
Gas Masks, Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 
HUdson 3-4430 



JACK MULLANE 


FOR HIRE 

Tuxedos - Full Dress - Cutaways - Caps 




714 - 11th STREET, N.W. 


Gowns - Hoods - Masquerade 
Costumes - Wigs - Theatrical 




MEnopolitan 8-9395 Washington, D.C. 


Make-Up Supplies 





63 




The Thomsen-Ellis- 
Hutton Company is 
proud to be associated 
with the University 
through the printing of 
the Maryland 
Magazine. 

Thomsen- Ellis -Hutton Company 

PRIDEMARK PRESS 

418 Water Street at Gay 
Baltimore 2 • Maryland 

LETTERPRESS AND OFFSET PRINTING 



LARGEST AF-ROTC 

(Concluded from page 4) 
various National Defense acts, but it was 
not until the First World War that the 
need for educated and trained officers was 
brought home with bitter results. Piatt s- 
burg Barracks, where officers were turned 
out on the assembly line and were forced 
to learn their military lore on the battle- 
fields of Fiance, was a lesson which the 
Armed Forces will never forget. In 1920 
the first ROTO program as we know it 
today was initiated. It, of course, was a 
T-Model affair compared to the present 
day development. However, from this pro- 
gram came the life-line of officers that were 
needed in the dark days of 1940-1943. 

It was this program that provided 85 per 
cent of al! commissioned officers on duty 
with the Armed Forces during that period 
when this nation, suddenly realizing its 
desperate plight, worked feverishly to 
I mild up its Officer Corps. In this modern 
age of technical warfare officers cannot be 
made overnight and more important is 
the fact, that the nation's youth cannot be 
made to realize their responsibilities in a 
matter of a few years. It requires years of 
indoctrination to prepare the nation's 
youth for the role it must play in future 
years. 

Today's Responsibilities 
With this thought in mind the Air Force, 
from its inception in 1947, had been striv- 
ing for a course designed to fit the student 
not only for eventual service as a commis- 
sioned officer, but also to indoctrinate the 
youth of today with responsibilities as 
citizens of tomorrow, along with fitting Air 
Science into the academic program. 



In summing up the change in curriculum 
from the specialization theme to the gen- 
eralized theme the spirit and intent of the 
original land grant act seems to be more 
apparent. In offering military instruction 
in broad related fields to augment the 
students academic course of study, the 
theory and history of military lore is 
placed in the college portion of instruction. 
The practical application is placed in the 
service training. This then produces an 
officer conversant with all phases of mili- 
tary tactics and science, ready to take his 
place along side of his regular brethren 
after the proper specialized training has 
been received and, insofar as the Univer- 
sity of Maryland is concerned in this year 
of 1953, the University may well augment 
Colonel Smallwood's exclamation to make 
it "See, the Old Line still holds". 



Selah! 

Experience is compounded upon yester- 
day's mistakes. 

*•••••••••* 

Anatole France: — 

At night we see the sad vestiges oj 
what we have neglected during the day. 
A dream is often tin revenge oj things 
neglected or oj persons deserted; hence 
its unexpectedness ami sometimes its sad- 
yiess. 



share in their family living. We saw life in 
Switzerland as no tourists will ever see it. 

DOMINICAN WORKSHOP 

(Continued from page 0) 
officials were asked to guide the construc- 
tion of courses of study in physical educa- 
tion for the entire country. Arrangements 
were made for future supervisory trips to 
the Republic in order that periodic evalua- 
tion might be made as to the extent to 
which the workshop materials and tech- 
niques are being utilized. The U. of Mary- 
land group was invited to return next 
summer for a second workshop on a more 
extended basis. 

The experience convinced all concerned 
that ventures of this kind make an im- 
mensely important contribution in the field 
of international relationships. It is difficult 
to describe the evidences of friendliness 
and appreciation shown by the Dominican 
teachers and their administrative leaders. 
The American group was there to give 
something which it considers to be tre- 
mendously important for satisfying living 
in the modern world. In return it received 
most gratifying professional and personal 
experiences. 

*•••••••••• 
Twin Assets 

To be great, a man with a head on his 
shoulders still needs a heart in his breast. 



CUT IT OUT NOW!" gg 




secretary, alumni association, 
university of maryland, college park, md. 



Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to 

the Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to 
"MARYLAND" for one year. 



Conservorive 

.4 conservative fellow is one who takes 
a twig oj mistletoe with him on his honey- 
moon. 



SWISS FAMILY 

(Concluded from page 5) 

fying one. Now I understand why they 
question all of the elaborate things that 
we do. Their way of life is one that is 
plain and made up of hard work. How- 
ever, they derive a great amount of en- 
joyment from it. It was nice to note how 
these people obviously enjoyed the beau- 
tiful scenery that surrounded them. It was 
a wonderful opportunity to be able to go 
into the homes of our foreign friends and 



Sez Testudinette: 




When a man 
sticks out his 
hand while driving it 
is a sign that the 
worm will turn . . . 
A girl need not be a 
theatre usher to put 
a man in his place . . . 
Best way to tie a girl 
hand and joot is with 
a rope oj pearls . . . 
A suitcase is a thing 
that, ajter packing, 
you remember you 
forgot to put so>ne- 
thing in the lid oj. 



64 



manufacturers of 
paints and 
varnishes 




INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL FINISHES 

AMERICAN 
PAINT PRODUCTS 

COMPANY, INC. 

PLANT & OFFICES 

1 108 O ST., S.E., Li 3-8993 

WASHINGTON STORE 

49 H ST., N.W., ST 3-9582 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



J 



DO IT NOW! 

USE THE COUPON 
ON OPPOSITE PAGE 



THE 

WASHINGTON 

BRICK CO. 

Manufacturers & Distributors of 

CLAY PRODUCTS 

COMMON BRICK 

FACE BRICK 
CINDER BLOCK 

SLAG BLOCK 

FLUE LINING 

DRAIN TILE 

SEWER PIPE 

WALL COPING 

There's Nothing Better 
On the Market 

OFFICE & PLANT ON THE 

Washington-Baltimore Blvd. 
MUIRKIRK, MARYLAND 

Phone: TOWER 9-6300 



ns^asniMiM® (g®< 



I NCORPORATED 



ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 



REpublic 7-1343 



2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 



WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 




Tennis Courts 

% Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 

Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91-0 Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D.C. 



SALES 




SERVICE 



AIR CONDITIONERS - REFRIGERATION - AUTOMATIC ICE MAKERS 

WASHINGTON REFRIGERATION CO 



2052 WEST VIRGINIA AVENUE, N.E. 



Lincoln 7-8300 



Washington, D.C. 



WHEN PATRONIZING ADVERTISERS PLEASE MENTION "MARYLAND" 



i 



4 






* * 







lS WHAT 






'Yo// receive every 
consideration at Suburban 
Trust. Go to any of their 
12 offices and you receive 
a friendly reception." 



No matter which of our many banking services you use, we believe you 
will like — and profit by — the sincere interest and extra friendliness found 
at SUBURBAN TRUST COMPANY. 

For our feeling is this: You deserve not only a BANK of broad scope 
and sound management, but also a neighborhood BANKER who takes 
an active personal interest in whatever contributes to your financial and 
business welfare. 

You who live and/or work in the Maryland segment 
of greater Washington, have an especially cordial 
invitation to call upon us for your banking 
and trust needs. 



Suburban Trust Company 

A Strong, friendly Bank 





SILVER SPRING, MD. 

8252 Georgia Ave. JUniper 5-1000 

College Pork, Md. — 7360 Baltimore Ave. 
Greenbelf, Md. — 25 Crescent Rd. 
White Oak, Md. — Naval Ordnance Laboratory 
West Hyattsville, Md. — 5416 Queens Chapel Rd. 
6842 New Hampshire Ave. — Takoma Park, Md. 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

5214 Baltimore Ave. UNion 4-7500 
Bethesdo, Md. — 4600 East-West Highway 
8722 Flower Ave. — (And Piney Branch Rd.) 
Mt. Rainier, Md. — 3716 Rhode Island Ave. 
Takoma Park, Md.— 6950 Carroll Ave. 
Wheoton, Md. — 11427 Georgia Ave. 



Suburban Washington's Largest Bank — Resources Over 70-Million Dollars 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



Regular Checking Accounts 
Special Checking Accounts 
Savings Accounts 
Christmas Savings Accounts 
Travelers Checks 
Safe Deposit Boxes 
Night Depository 
Trust Services 
Personal Loans 
Business Loans 
Collateral Loans 
Automobile Loans 
Insurance Loans 
Home Improvement 
: Modernization Loans 



MAY -JUNE 1953 
50 cents the copy 



UNWfc**» 



UB*AR Y 



»M 



re 



I*r* 







K 



/ 



■? * 










« *.<*£ 



.N 







1 3 ■ 2E!^% 


^ 


* r 38^e''^' ' 


i Auk!**!"- ' - ''■ 
- t J- /-■:, 




'**:•-.'• 



jfl^BSZ?^^"^ 



-.ivm 



West Brothers 
Brick Company 

Manufacturers in the Nation's Capital 

Since 1844 



We Supplied the Brick 

. . . used in the construction 

of the beautiful 

Administration 

Building 

at the 

University of 

Maryland 



l perry west 
john n. lyle 
william p. recker 
collins h. Mcdonald 
norval w. righter 
james b. carrico 



Face and Common Brick 
Hollow Building Tile 
Slag Building Block 
Mortar 
Cement 

Plant: 

Fairmount Heights 

Prince Georges County 

Office: 

Southern Building 
805 15th St., N.W. 
Washington 5, D.C. 





For Modern Plumbing & Heating 

We offer the finest quality in wholesale 

PLUMBING & HEATING SUPPLIES 
PIPE • VALVES • FITTINGS 

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIFICATIONS 
AVAILABLE FOR ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS 




Visit Our Complete, Modern 
PLUMBING and HEATING SHOWROOM 

1206 K Street, N.W., • Washington, D. C. 



WAREHOUSES 
4th & Channing Sts., N.E. 



NEW BRANCH BRANCH 

82 1 6 Georgia Ave. 1 680 Clough Street 

1206-8 K Street, N.W. Silver Spring Baltimore 

Washington, D. C. Maryland Maryland 

R. D. Watson, President — Class 1917 



•iA3ii:s a. >ii;nni;k company 



Vol. XXIV 



May-June 1953 



No. 4 




^Wfefe^ 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, 
and entered at the Post Office. College Park. Md.. as 
second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of 
March 3, 1879. S3. 00 per year Fifty cents the copy . 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



JULIET WOODFIELD, Subscriptions 

5 East 33rd St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10, Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 



General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Lee W. Adkins '42, Abram Z. 

Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Marjorie R. Wharton '41, C. G. Donovan '17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Norman Sinclair '43, Harry A. Boswell, Jr. '42, 

Roger L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Harry Levin '26, C. Clifton Coward 

'23, Arthur I. Bell '19. 
EDUCATION— E. Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart 

McCaw '35, Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING— S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mary R. Lankford '26, 

Mary S. Humelsine '39, Hilda Jones Nystrom 

•32. 
LAW — C. Ferdinand Sybert '25, G. Kenneth 

Reiblich '29, John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurston 

R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY— Frank Block '24, Frank Black '04, 

Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING— Flora Street '38, Eva Darley '27, 

Nancy J. Strong '52. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Charles W. Sylvester '08. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly '21. 
"M" CLUB— Albert B. Heagy '30. 
NEW ENGLAND— Dr. Walter S. Longo '22. 
NEW YORK— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Gordon Kessler '29. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Egbert Tingley '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher '45. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President— T. T. Speer '17 
University President — Dr. H. C. Byrd '08 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham '38 



Urge Your Fellow 

Alumni to Support 

"Maryland" 



USE THE SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 
ON PAGE 80 



C^ditoriald 




HARVEY L. MILLER 

Editor 



Honors and Awards 

Tribute to "losers" 

This is the season of the year when out- 
standing performances among college 
men and women result in Honors and 
Axoards assemblies. There, quite properly, 
the winners in various lines of endeavor, 
from class room 
to the athletic- 
field, receive the 
awards, the lau- 
rels of victory. 
That is definitely 
as it should be. 
Winners should 
receive the top 
honors. To the 
victor belongs the 
spoils. There is 
no substitute for 
victory. 
However, since 
those accorded the accolades at Honors 
and Awards are winners they will, we feel 
sure, join with us here, just for once, in 
a tribute to losers. 

In order to win, every winner needs a 
loser. The winner needs the loser much 
more than the loser needs the winner. 
Winner and loser are a team. Without 
both there can be no contest and, hence, 
no victory and no honors and awards. 

Let us mention a few losers in sports 
and in more important fields. 

In the index files of a Hollywood mo- 
tion picture studio is the card of a loser. 
a rejectee. It reads, "Aging. Slightly bald. 
Can't act. Can dance a little". The card 
is titled "Fred Astaire". 

In New York a mother remarked. "My 
son Paulie is handicapped. He is deaf and, 
as a result, almost dumb. That is why he 
cannot take part in athletics like other 
boys. They leave him behind". 

"They", however, did not leave Paulie 
too far behind. He became lightheavy- 
weight boxing champion of the world. Lad 
named Paul Bcrlenbach. 

Similarly, a young boy in Hegewi.-rh, 
111. broke his left elbow while playing 
circus. Insufficient medical attention avail- 
able for poor people, foreign born, could 
probably be blamed for the fact that the 
lad's elbow heeled "frozen". No mobility 
in it. That lad. too, took up boxing. He 
became the greatest long distance fighter 
the world has ever known, his chief stock 
in trade a blow he called "the left half 
scissors to the liver'', adding. "I thank the 
Lord for this broken elbow". Fellow named 
Battling Nelson, world's lightweight cham- 
pion. 

Back in the '20's U.S. destroyers in Tur- 
kish waters staged a minstrel show for the 
benefit of burned out citizens of Smyrna, 
Turkey. Remarked the Lieutenant Com- 



mander in charge of production. "That red 
headed banjo player on the end tries so 
hard that we'll keep him in the show. 
He's excess baggage and not a good per- 
former. We'll keep him on only because 
he tries so hard". The fellow kept on 
trying. As radio came into being he hooked 
en there but failed on his first attempt to 
crash radio in New York. He tried some 
more. That "red headed banjo player on 
the end" did not do badly for a loser. 
Fellow named Arthur Godfrey. 

An old fashioned stove exploded in a 
house in Kansas. A young fellow sitting 
nearby was so badly burned he was not 
expected to walk again. He walked. He 
bought a little wagon and pushed it so 
he would restore mobility to his legs, badly 
scarred from waist to toe. Twice Olympic 
champion he was America's greatest all- 
time miler. Lad named Glenn Cunning- 
ham. 

In the 8th Marines in World War I the 
fellows used to laugh at a big. awkward 
kid who announced that he was destined 
for a world's boxing title. They laughed 
some more when he signed up for the AEF 
championships. Some how, however, he 
won in that field. Turning pro he was 
tossed out of the ring in Philadelphia in 
a bout so poor it was called "no contest". 
He boxed a preliminary on the Dempsey- 
Carpentier card and was convincingly un- 
impressive. But he kept on trying. A 
middleweight, much smaller than our Ma- 
rine, beat him so badly he became nau- 
seated in the ring. However, he didn't 
know how to quit. His medical advisors 
told him his hands were too small, brittle 
and breakable. He hied himself to the 
Maine woods and swung an axe. He 
emerged with hands like hams and weigh- 
ing over 200. He won the world's light- 
heavyweight title. Quite an accomplish- 
ment but dwarfed by the fact that he 
later retired as undefeated heavyweight 
champion of the world, twice winner over 
Jack Dempsey. The sports world knew 
him as Gene Tunney. 

Newton, Massachusetts, is very proud 
these days of having given the United 
States another world champion. Thereby 
hangs the story of a little eleven year old 
girl who took up ice skating after an 
attack of polio. Muscular stiffness and 
weakness indicated need for exercise. The 
consistent practice in that sport did not 
keep her from gaining straight "A's" at 
Manter Hall Prep School in Cambridge. 
She plans to enter Radcliffe College (pre- 
medicine). The world of sports hails her 
as the 17 year old who came back from 
the Swiss Alps and top international com- 
petition as the first American girl to have 
ever won a world figure skating champion- 
ship. She is beautiful little Tenley Al- 
bright, her life a vivid and living example 
of the bright red badge of courage. 

In the U.S. Fleet a would-be boxer 
named Josef Paul Cuckoshay, L'.S.S. Den- 
ver, tried three times to win the fleet 
heavyweight title. He bowed out each 
time in bouts against a pudgy ship's baker 
named Crowley. Josef Paul Cuckoshay 
could not win a Fleet title. But he kept 
on trying. The record books list him as 
Jack Sharkey, world's heavyweight boxing 
champion. 

{Continued on page jg) 



[2; 



YOU ARE THE HEIRS 

A Maryland Day Tribute to the "Ark" and "Dove" Men Who 

Lost Their Shirts, Urging Maryland Youth to Carry on the 

Traditions Established by These Founding Fathers 



The Maryland Doy Convocation Address Delivered 

By Neil H. Swanson 

Executive Editor 
Baltimore Sunpapers 

Three hundred and nineteen years ago 
two puny ships dropped anchor in 
Potomac waters. 

It was the climax of a dangerous and 
often miserable voyage that had lasted 
just a few days less than half a year. 

Jam-packed on the decks were "twenty 
gentlemen of very good fashion, and three 
hundred laboring men well provided in 
all things/' That's what it says in Lord 
Baltimore's quaint old letter. 

I'm sorry to have to tell the girls, that 
Lord Baltimore didn't bother to count the 
women. They weren't important. 

And fashion, to his way to thinking, was 
the concern of the gentlemen, not the 
ladies. How times have changed! 

They have changed in a great many 
ways since that March 25th in the year 
1634 when three hundred and twenty men 
— and some women who didn't count — 
founded the colony of Maryland on an 
island they called St. Clement's. 

Shallow Water 

There was no Plymouth Rock. There 
was no "stern and rock-bound coast" for 
the poets to write about. The stream was 
too shallow for boats. The Maryland 
pilgrims simply .jumped overboard into 
the water and waded ashore. They arrived 
m the Promised Land muddy and wet and 
bedraggled — unglamorous — unromantic. 

Some of them lost their shirts! 

They used Chesapeake Bay for a wash- 
tub, and the tide took their laundry away. 

Those are the people I see — the people 
who lost their shirts. 

Men of Bold Dreams 

They aie the reason for Maryland Day 
— the men of far vision — the men of bold 
dreams — the men not daunted by six 
months of winter ocean in wet, stinking 
ships so small that storms worried and 
tossed them and crunched them like bones 
in the teeth of a mastiff 
. . . the men not afraid of new worlds: 
not even a dangerous world that blazed 
with alarm-fires of savage tribes as the 
Ark and the Dove came to their Maryland 
landfall 

. . .the men who risked more than their 
shirti — who risked fortunes and lives — 
and lost them, too, often enough 
. . . the men — and the women who didn't 
count, but whose courage and endurance. 
patience, sacrifice and hardship matched 
the courage and endurance, patience, sacri- 
fice and hardship of the men they loved 
and followed. 

They, and the generations that came 
after them in this new world, created a 
new way of life. They, and the generations 
that came after them, created here the 



most comfortable, the most luxurious 
civilization history has ever known. 

You arc the heirs. You have inherited 
earth's richest treasure. It is a treasure 
whose value you cannot know unless you 
understand its nature and its source. Your 
legacy can't be weighed on a grocer's scale 
nor counted on adding machines. 

It can't be appraised by the test of 
statistics that say we own most of the 
world's telephones and bath-tubs, radios 
and refrigerators, automobiles and electric 
washers. Cadillacs and television sets are 
not the measure of the way of life that 
you inherit. They are only a by-product. 

We must not forget that the main 
product of three centuries of risk and 
striving is still freedom — the ideal of per- 
sonal liberty guaranteed by law — even- 
handed and impartial justice — equality of 
opportunity — the inalienable dignity of the 
individual — the inalienable right of the 
people, under laws made by the people, 
to think, to write, to speak, to worship 
without fear. 

To be Uncommon 

The main product is still the inalienable 
right of the common man not to be sup- 
pressed and classified and limited to com- 
monness, but to make himself uncommon 
— to build himself the amplest, richest life 
his hopes and dreams, his ability, his 
energy and his initiative enable him to 
build." 

We dare not forget, in the pride of our 
material achievements, that these achieve- 
ments did not grow from a material soil. 
They were rooted — they are rooted yet — 
in the rich soil of the spirit. 

They sprang from the seed of a great 
dream — from the hopes and longings and 
the aspirations of men and women to be 
free. The seed was scattered in this new 
world by the little ships that brought men 
longing to be free — to have a chance — to 
meet the challenges of opportunity with- 
out the crippling chains of privilege and 
caste. That was the source of everything 
we have — of all we are. 

Powerful Force 

When the dream of freedom was set 
down on paper, it released a pent-up force 
more powerful that the atom bomb. 

It released, for the first time, the aspira- 
tions, the abilities, the energies and the 
initiative of ordinary men. 

You are the heirs! 

It seems to me to be important that 
we know at least a little about how this 
legacy has been created — how it has been 
built up, generation after generation. 

That is why I pay tribute to the men 
who lost their shirts. 

They were people who were not exclu- 
sively concerned with getting — about 
people who possessed the vision, the heart 
and the will for giving. There are and 




YOU ARE THE HEIRS!" 



"These words are yours. To 'act as friends 
of liberty and the general interests of mankind.' 
They are the source of your inheritance", said 
Mr. Neil H. Swanson, Executive Editor of the 
Baltimore Sunpapers, in Maryland Day con- 
vocation address. 



have been many more such people in the 
world than some of our philosophers would 
lead us to believe. On Maryland Day, it 
is fitting to seek out a few examples from 
the story of the Free State. 

Maryland's part in the making of Amer- 
ica cannot be measured by its size. Many 
years before its famous act of toleration, 
it provided the new world's first practical 
example of religious tolerance and free- 
dom. 

When Maryland was less than seven 
years old, it took the first step toward 
united action by the colonies — an alliance 
with Virginia for mutual defense against 
the Indians. 

Virginia provided the United States with 
the father of his country. 

Maryland Fore-sighted 

Maryland was even more fore-sighted. 
It helped to found Virginia and also helped 
to run it. Lord Calvert was a member 01 
the Virginia Company in 1609. In 1624. 
he was one of the councillors appointed 
to govern the province of Virginia. And 
that's not all! 

It was Maryland that thoughtfully fur- 
nished Virginia with George Washington's 
first American ancestor — his great-great- 
great grandfather, Nicholas Martian. 
Maryland was one of the seven colonies 
that took the first long step toward union 
twt nty-two years before the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

On July 10th, in the year 1754, Mary- 
land's delegates cast their votes for an 
American confederacy — the forerunner of 
our constitution. 

It is not too much to say that twice 
Maryland has saved the nation. At the 
Battle of Long Island, it was the repeated 
charges of the Maryland battalion that 
saved Washington's defeated army from 
destruction. In the long perspective of the 
years, I believe that the heroic defense 
of Baltimore against the t luce-day am- 



[31 



phibian attack in September, 1814. lias 
become in fact one of the decisive battles 
of the modern world. 

On August 24, 1814, the American army 
was routed on the field of Bladensburg. 
Washington was captured. It was burning 
The president of the United States was a 
fugitive. 

The Ultimatum 

On that same day, the American peace 
commissioners at Ghent were reading a 
British ultimatum. This is what it said: 

1. The United Slates must disarm its 
northern border. It must destroy its forts 
there. It must have no forts, no troops, no 
warships on that frontier. 

2. England would annex the northern 
half of Maine. 

3. England would annex the northern 
half of Minnesota. 

4. The Mississippi would no longer be 
an American river. It would belong to 
England as much as it belonged to the 
United States. 

5. The United States must give up all 
of that great region which now includes 
Ohio. Indiana. Illinois, Michigan. Wis- 
consin, Iowa and the southern half of 
Minnesota. England would set up there a 
British satellite — a buffer state — an Indian 
nation under British military guardianship. 

If the United States had been compelled 
to yield to the terms of that ultimatum, 
there would not be today any nation 
faintly resembling the United States as we 
now know it. 

We did not yield. Why? 

On the seventeenth day of October, 
London heard the news that its great fleet 
and army had been repulsed in their at- 
tack on Baltimore. Four days later, on 
October 21, the British government with- 
drew its ultimatum. 

It abandoned its attempt to cripple the 
United States by the creation of a satellite 
state that would have blocked our way to 
the Pacific. 

Historical Speculation 

What I am about to say now may sound 
fantastic. But I believe it is quite possible 
that the issue of the War Between the 
States was decided, not at Gettysburg or 
Vicksburg or on the Peninsula of Virginia 
or in the Wilderness, but in the Battle of 
Baltimore on September 12, 13 and 14 in 
1814. 

For the states that sprang up in the 
region where the British ultimatum of 1814 
would have set up a foreign satellite sent 
800.000 men into the Northern armies. 

I believe it is a reasonable historical 
speculation to say that those 800,000 men 
were the balance of manpower that won 
the Civil War. 

I believe that if American defeat at 
Baltimore in 1814 had kept those states 
from being born, we might now have two 
nations — the United States and the Con- 
federate States. 

Where then would have come the 
strength that turned the tide of battle 
against German tyranny in 1918 and again 
in 1945? 

Where then would have come the 
strength that now holds in check the new 
tyranny of Russian communist imperial- 
ism ? 



The free world might not exist today if 
Maryland men had not stood fast and 
fought at Baltimore in 1814. 

There is another aspect of the story of 
the Free State that should be remembered. 
The people of Maryland have dared to be 
unpopular. They have dared to stand by 
their convictions in the face of overwhelm- 
ing national opinion. 

It was Maryland, one of the first seven 
colonies to take part in a plan for an 
American confederacy, that held out for 
five long years against the Articles of 
Confederation that would make the United 
States for the first time a nation. In the 
face of violent abuse, it refused to ratify 
the Articles until the states that claimed 
the vast inland reaches of the continent 
agreed to cede their western lands to the 
United States. By that stubborn opposi- 
tion, Maryland provided the new nation 
with the resources that were to sustain it 
in its early years of trial and trouble. Out 
of the territory it preserved for the central 
government sprang the states of Indiana 
and Ohio, Michigan and Illinois and Min- 
nesota and Wisconsin. 

President John Hanson 

And it was Maryland that furnished the 
first president of the United States "in 
congress assembled." His name, you may 
know, was John Hanson. 

There is one thing that hasn't changed 
in the three centuries of our existence as 
a people— one thing that probably has 
never changed in all the centuries mankind 
has known. 

That is the unvarying conviction of 
each older generation that, somehow, there 
is something wrong about the younger 
generation. 

I'd like to read you two examples out 
of letters that have come to me within 
the last few weeks. One of them said: 
"Patriotism, religious conviction, the dig- 
nity of the individual as contrasted with 
the mass man have been in the intellectual 
doghouse for two generations." The other 
said : "I am acutely aware of the fact that 
we have in this country a whole generation 
of young cynics who say 'Oh, yeah?' to 
anything connected with patriotism or 
religion." 

False and Foolish 

To the young men and women of this 
new. maligned, indicted generation, I 
would like to say: "1 don't believe a word 
<>) it!" I believe that those indictments 
are both false and foolish. 

One of the difficulties about getting old 
is the difficulty of accepting the simple 
fact that time is running out. I can't quite 
get used to the idea that I am now a 
member of the older generation. 

I remember other convocations — con- 
vocations when I wasn't up here on the 
platform: when I was out there, with you. 

I remember — how distinctly! — we were 
very sure that there was nothing wrong 
with us. Perhaps, now, I am trying to hold 
list, with reluctant fingers, to my long 
lost youth. Perhaps, now, I am trying to 
identify myself with you. / wish I could! 
But I can't. 

Here I am, gray-haired, too blind to see 
your faces clearly. What can a man of 
my generation say to the young people 



to whom we are passing on an endangered 
country, beset by problems much graver 
than those we faced when we were young 
in a world half slave and half free? What 
can I possibly say that you can accept 
and believe? I'm not sure. But I'm going 
to take a chance. I'm going to talk tough. 
I'm going to talk to you now as I talked, 
a long time ago. to some people about 
your age. 

Learned the Hard Way 

They were boys from Dakota farms and 
the Ozark mountains. They were soldiers. 
At least, we called them soldiers. It wasn't 
true. They weren't ready to fight. If my 
memory hasn't failed me. most of them 
hadn't had uniforms on for even as much 
as three months, when they were shipped 
overseas. They weren't decently armed. 
They had no grenades, and they wouldn't 
have known what to do with grenades if 
.they had them; they'd never pulled the 
pin of a live grenade. They were going 
in with weapons they'd never fired — with 
weapons they'd never xecn — with new 
automatic rifles still in the factory packing- 
cases, shoved into their hands the day they 
were sent to the front. They weren't very 
happy about it. They knew they weren't 
ready, and they were nervous and scared. 
So was I. 

I had come down from the lines to take 
them into the trenches where Maryland's 
famous Fifth Infantry got its baptism of 
fire in 1918. It seemed to me that the 
only thing I could possibly do to help 
them, that day. was to tell them the hard- 
boiled truth about what it was going to be 
like. I was criticized for it. I was informed 
that I'd scared them and wrecked their 
morale. However, as long as I live I'll 
remember the pride I felt when the first 
fight came — when our front was hit — and 
not one of those kids from the farms and 
the Ozark hills budged from a single fox 
hole. They held their line, and advanced. 

Hard-Boiled Truth 

Now I want to tell you some hard-boiled 
truth. You have come into manhood and 
womanhood in a difficult and dangerous 
time. We are at war with an armed doc- 
trine. We are a nation beseiged b> r a 
fanatic ideology that brazenly announces 
its intention to destroy us. It is no figure 
of speech to say that we are living once 
more in the days of Genghis Khan and 
of Attilla. Against its will, this peaceful 
nation has been compelled to turn itself 
into a garrison. 

For thirty years, the tyrants in the 
Kremlin have given us no reason to sup- 
pose that the Red men of our time are 
less treacherous, less ruthless, less barbaric 
or less cruel than the red men who burned 
and killed and tortured within thirty miles 
of Baltimore, a hundred and twenty years 
after Maryland was founded. It is no 
figure of speech to say that we have been 
driven once more to the stockades and 
the loopholes. 

You are the ones on whom this burden 
falls. You are the new defenders of 
America. So what? 

So I've been hearing things about you 
I've been told that you don't like it. I've 
been hearing that you young American: 
believe a dirty trick has been played on 



[4] 



you. I've been hearing that you think 
the men and women of my generation 
have loused up the world — that we have 
made a mess of tilings, and blandly left 
the mess to be cleaned up by you. That 
is not altogether true. 

The men and women of my generation 
have made their mistakes. You will make 
yours. God help you not to make too 
many. 

But neither my generation nor the gen- 
erations of Americans who have genu 
before us have played any dirty tricks 
upon you. It is not unfair that you should 
now have to take upon yourselves the 
burden of defending this America. It is 
quite fair and reasonable. For America 
i> yours. You have inherited a nation. 

If you inherit a piece of property, you 
will expect to take care of it. You'd be 
pretty foolish if you didn't. If somebody 
gives you an expensive automobile, you 
will keep it washed and polished — you will 
keep gas in the tank — you'll keep air in 
the tires — you'll keep the motor tuned. 

House of Freedom 

You know that if you don't, it just won't 
run. But you are the heirs to something 
much more precious than the finest auto- 
mobile. You have inherited a house of 
freedom. 

If some relative leaves you a house, you 
will think it only sensible and proper to 
keep the roof in good repair. You know 
that if you don't the rain will come in and 
the plaster fall. You'll keep the furnace 
clean. You know that if you don't, you'll 
have no heat. You'll keep the woodwork 
painted. You know that if you don't, the 
boards will warp and rot — the house decay 
— your legacy be lost. 

You've got a house. It's yours. But 
you didn't build it. It was "conceived in 
liberty'' by architects long dead. 

Its foundations were laid by men who 
dared to dream of freedom in a time when 
being guilty of such dreams could mean 
a noose around the neck. It doesn't show 
in the paintings, but when the blueprints 
i if this house of freedom were prepared 
in Philadelphia in 1776. the shadow of the 
gallows lay across the table. 

This house that you inherit was begun 
by men who dared to build a nation upon 
what the world then regarded as the flimsi- 
est and most ridiculous foundation ever 
heard of — the foundation of an ideal writ- 
ten on a piece of paper. To the world's 
amazement, those ideals turned out to 
have the qualities of steel and granite. 
And the walls are just as solid. 

Fundamental Principles 

They have been built of fundamental 
principles of human rights and liberties — 

of justice — and of opportunity. . . . Your 
rights and liberties. . . . Your guarantees 
of justice. . . . Your opportunities. . . . 
Your legacy, unearned, but given to you 
freely the day you were born. 

But when you inherited this house you 
didn't build, this house you didn't pay 
for. you inherited also the responsibility 
to keep it in repair, to keep it strong, to 
keep it safe. I'm not going to kid you. 
I'm not here to tell you that it's going 
to be easy. It's going to be tough. It may 
be very tough. Many of you young men 




HEADS OF RED CROSS DRIVE 



Haley Foto 



The University Faculty and Personnel took enthusiastic part in the 1953 Red Cross campaign. 
Seated are Mrs. Geary Eppley, Berwyn District Chairman; and Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, Faculty 
Chairman. 

Standing (L to R) : Miss Sally Lynde, President of the Student Red Cross Unit; Mrs. Miriam 
Baselaar, Executive Secretary; Leland Worthington, County Campaign Chairman and Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, University President. 



will go from your classrooms into uniform. 
Many of your girls will know the heart's 
emptiness of hope deferred — of loneliness 
and dread. 

This is not a burden that has been im- 
posed on you unfairly. Your generation 
has not been singled out for a responsibil- 
ity that others have escaped. Generation 
after generation, young men have put their 
bodies between this house of freedom and 
t lie envy, hate and malice of enemies who 
try to tear it down. Whatever it may 
cost, it's worth the price. 

If there ever was a dream house, it is 
this one. It has been fashioned of the 
dreams and hopes, the vision and the 
courage, the sacrifice and hardship and de- 
votion of three hundred years. Its walls 
have been cemented by the sweat of men 
who lost their shirts — by the blood of men 
who gave their lives — and by the tears of 
women. It is the noblest, the most 
spacious, the most comfortable house ever 
built by mankind since the world began. 

Can Change It 

That's not all. The most amazing thing 
about this house of freedom is that you. 
the heirs, can change it. If it isn't yet 
quite perfect, you can make it better. You 
can build it into a more stately mansion. 

The architects who planned it had the 
vision to provide you with the tools to go 
on building. They included, in the blue- 
prints, plans for changing to meet changed 
conditions — to build always broader, 
stronger, higher — to make it possible for 
future generations to match the farthest 
reaches of their dreams. I can't help 
wondering whether you realize how high 
that first dream soared. It isn't in the 
books. 

Go back with me now, if you will, not 
to St. Clement's Island in 1634. but to 
Maryland's Eastern Shore one hundred 
and forty years later. It is May 24th in 
the year 1774. The people of Talbot 
county have jusi heard the news of the 



blockade of Boston and the military occu- 
pation of the city. They are not excep- 
tional people. They are ordinary people, 
even as you and I. A few of them own 
broad plantations. Most of them are 
watermen and farmers. 

At militia musters, many of them march 
on bare feet. But they have assembled 
now in county meeting to decide what 
they should do. They are confronting the 
greatest power on earth, in the world as 
they now know it. They are facing the 
possibility of war against the massive, 
dominating strength of Britain. 

This is their decision, set down in the 
first sentence of the resolution they adopt : 

— to "act as friends to liberty and to 
the general interests of mankind." 

Genius to Share 

There, in that simple and great-hearced 
phrase, is the essence of the ideals we 
cherish. Those early Marylanders did not 
assert the right to liberty as a right to be 
established and defended for themselves 
alone, for their own selfish reasons. 

They asserted it as a right to be shared 
with all mankind! 

There is the fundamental characteristic 
of this nation that has made it and still 
makes it different from all other nations 
history has ever known. There is the 
genius of this American people — the will 
to share their liberty with others. 

Mark those words: not a passive will- 
ingness to share — a will to share — a posi- 
tive, undaunted will to share the price 
such liberty demands. It is a quality that 
partakes of God. That quality is yours. 

Those words are yours: to "act as frit mis 
to liberty ami to the i/i neral interest oi 
mankind." 

They are at once the sum and source 
of your inheritance. They are the eternal 
fire that lights and warms this house of 
freedom. It is your house, now. It is 
yours to guard and cherish. It i- safe in 
your hands. 



[5; 




Mr. Burke 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

C. Ewing Tuttle and Edmund 

S. Burke Appointed to Fill 

Vacancies 



r. C. Ewing Tuttle, of Baltimore, and 
Mr. Edmund S. Burke, of Cumber- 
land, have been 
appointed to the 
University's 
Board of Re- 
gents, vice the 
Messrs. Philip C. 
Turner and J. 
Milton Patter- 
son, who died re- 
cently. Mr. Burke 
is one of Cum- 
berland's most 
prominent busi- 
ness men and 
civic leaders. He 
was born in Wal- 
lingford, Connec- 
ticut in 1893 and 
attended high 
school there while working part time. He 
has been in the rubber manufacturing bus- 
iness since 1911 and is President of the 
Kelly-Springfield Tire Company. 

Mr. Burke has been a resident of Cum- 
berland since 1935 and is President and 
Director of the Cumberland Chamber of 
Commerce. He was formerly director of 
the Y. M. C. A. at Cumberland. He is 
Director of the Liberty Trust Company 
of Cumberland as well as of the Com- 
munity Chest of that city. He is also a 
member of the Cumberland Rotary Club. 

C. E. Tuttle 

Mr. Tuttle was born in Hastings, Minne- 
sota, and after graduation from High 
School there, attended the University of 
Minnesota for a short period. 

Mr. Tuttle's business career really began 
before he left school, and the impelling 
reason for not continuing a formal edu- 
cation was an interesting opportunity in 
industry. Here he served in various ca- 
pacities and eventually established his own 
business which he operated exclusively 
until 1923, at which time he also became 
Chairman and President of the Pittsburgh 
Terminal R. R. and Coal Co., and a direc- 
tor and officer in other related enterprises 

His activities included an interest in 
investment banking, with particular em- 
phasis on the development of new in- 
dustries and enterprises, and from 1928 
through 1935 was Vice-President and Di- 
rector of Payson & Co., private bankers 
in New York City specializing in the 
financing of new enterprises. In 1929 with 
Mr. Payson and others, he became in- 
terested in the possibilities of stainless 
steel, then in the early period of its 
development, and a controlling interest 
in a small company organized for the 
manufacture of stainless steel was acquired 
in Baltimore. In 1930 Mr. Tuttle assumed 
the management of the undertaking, which 
subsequently became the Rustless Iron & 
Steel Corp., and in 1935 he relinquished his 
other principal business connections to lie- 
vote his attention to the growing industry. 



By 1944 the Rustless Iron & Steel Corp. 
had grown to be the largest producer of 
stainless steel in the world, and contributed 
greatly to the growth of the entire indus- 
try through new developments in processes 
and products. In that year Mr. Tuttle sold 
his interest to Armco Steel Corp., and 
served as management consultant with that 
company until March of 1949. During his 
association with Rustless Iron & Steel 
Corp., Mr. Tuttle was also President of 
Alloys Research Corp. and Rustless Min- 
ing & Smelting Corp. 

Since his disassociation from Rustless. 
Mr. Tuttle has continued active in the 
management of other diverse situations 
including a cattle ranch in Oregon, and a 
horse and cattle breeding farm in Mary- 
land. He is a stockholder and director in 
the Maryland State Fair & Agricultural 
Association. In 1949 he became one of the 
Voting Trustees and Directors of the 
Maryland Jockey Club, which positions 
he resigned this past December when the 
control of the Club and its holdings were 
sold to the "Old Hilltop Corp.". 

Mr. Tuttle is a member of the Maryland, 
Greenspring Valley, Elkridge, Elkridge- 
Hartford Clubs, and also of the Chicago 
Club (Chicago) and the Duquesne Club 
(Pittsburgh). 

Although long and actively interested 
in National affairs, Mr. Tuttle has never 
sought elective or appointive office ; how- 
ever, he was on Mr. Herbert Hoover's 
special advisory committee at the time 
Mr. Hoover was Secretary of Commerce. 

Mr. Tuttle has a daughter, Mrs. J. F. 
Colwill of Lutherville, and a grandson. 
Stiles Tuttle Colwill. 

Spring Reunion 

Alumni of six College Park Schools 
will converge on the University 
campus for class reunions and a banquet 
on Friday, June 5. Arrangements are 
being made for class reunions by five year 
periods including the classes of 1903, 1908, 
1913, 1918, 1923, 1928, 1933, 1938, 1943, 
1948. Class officers are being asked to con- 
tact members of their classes regarding the 
respective programs for each. 

This Spring Alumni Day, scheduled im- 
mediately before Commencement, will 
place emphasis on class reunions com- 
mencing shortly after Noon and will also 
include planned tours of the campus in- 
cluding the new Chapel, the Athletic Plant, 
new Engineering developments, the rifle 
range, and many other points of interest. 

Individual School business meetings are 
being planned for 5:00 P.M. and will be 
followed by an alumni banquet in the 
Dining Hall honoring the reunion classes. 

Notification of events and an invitation 
to attend on Friday, June 5 will soon go 
to all College Park alumni. In addition 
each will be invited to remain for the 
Commencement program on June 6. 

Commencement '53 

The 1953 Commencement Day Exercises 
will take place on the Quadrangle on 
Saturday June 6th beginning at 10 a.m. 
(leary F. Eppley, Dean of Men is General 
Chairman. 

Alma H. Preinkert, University Registrar, 
announced that there would be 1550 candi- 
dates for degrees. 




Registrar Preinkert 



Enrollment '53 

Student enrollment figures recently re- 
leased by the Univer- 
sity of Maryland's 
Registrar, Alma Prein- 
kert, indicate a total 
of 8,386 men and 
women completing 
undergraduate work, 
while 1,539 students 
are doing graduate 
studies. 

Of the 8,386 under- 
[ graduate students' 
listed 2,352 men and 
women are doing work 
at one or more of the 
University's extension schools, while 496 
of the 1.539 graduate students are study- 
ing apart from the College Park campus. 
Students are listed by the individual 
colleges at College Park as follows : 

College Men Worm n 

Agriculture 425 18 

Arts and Sciences 1,204 

Business and Public Ad- 
ministration 
Education 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
Military Science 
Nursing 
Physical Education and 

Recreation 

Special and Continuation 

Studies at College Park 

Special and Continuation 

Studies apart from 

College Park 

In the senior class there are 714 men, 

197 women; junior class, 693 men, 249 

women; sophomore class, 1,179 men, 444 

women; freshman class, 1,554 men, 627 

women ; unclassified students, 89 men, 38 

women and part-time students total 250, 

167 of whom are men. 

The grand total listed by Miss Preinkert 
stands at 9,925 with 7,619 men and 2,306 



577 



997 


127 


190 


388 


717 


4 


10 


356 


174 





115 



573 



47 



65 



1.966 376 



Honor Dr. Byrd 

The Faculty Club gave a tea at Ross- 
borough in honor of Dr. H. C. Byrd in 
recognition of the President's forty-one 
years of service to the University. 

The Faculty Club presented Dr. Byrd 
with a golden key to his office in com- 
memoration of the occasion. 

Professor Russell B. Allen is currently 
president of the Faculty Club. 




Gloomy Gus : — "My dad wrote to the Dean 
asking him how I was doing as a student?" 

Smiley Smirkins: — "Yeh? What did the 
Dean answer?" 

G. G. : — "He wrote. 'As a student your son 
will go down in history but, possibly, on 
easier subjects he may pull up to a passing 
mark' ". 



[6] 




Many Little Ones in Our Business 

Ninety-five out of every hundred telephone calls are local. Average 
sale is smaller than the neighborhood drug store or grocery store. 



When you think of the Bell System you're 
likely to think of some big figures. But we're 
pretty much of a small-town business and 
our average sale is small. 

More than nine out of every ten cities and 
towns in which we operate have less than 
fifty thousand population. Ninety-five out 
of every hundred telephone calls are purely 
local. 

The Bell Telephone Companies own 



property locally, pay taxes locallv and hire 
local men and women. 

The Bell telephone business is owned bv 
people living in cities, towns and rural areas 
all over America. It is as much a part of the 
community as Main Street. 

Matter of fact, our average sale is smaller 
than the neighborhood grocerv or drug store. 
For toll and local calls combined it averages 
only 7 cents. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Local to serve the community. Nationwide to serve the nation. 




WELL KNOWN ALUMNI 

Many Maryland Graduates Have Reached Prominent Posi- 
tions in Various Walks of Life 



OX the opposite page "Maryland" mag- 
azine is happy to print another pic- 
ture page of prominent graduates of the 
University. 

This is the sixth such page. The pic- 
tures are gathered with little effort and 
less research. The presentation of such 
graduates could, apparently, be an almost 
endless undertaking and Maryland alumni 
have every reason to be proud of the Uni- 
versity's many distinguished graduates. 

Skeletonized biographical data follows. 

Judge Ogle Marbury 

The distinguished Chief Judge of the 
Maryland State Court of Appeals, Judge 
Ogle Marbury. received his law degree 
from the University of Maryland in 1904. 

While Judge Marbury has served as 
Chief Judge of the court since 1944, his 
record also includes many other notable 
accomplishments. He has served as presi- 
dent of the Maryland State Bar Associa- 
tion, chairman of the Hall of Records 
Commission of Maryland, and member of 
the House of Delegates. 

He has held the posts of both Assistant 
and Acting Attorney General of the State, 
chairman of the State Board of Prison 
Control, Associate Judge of the Seventh 
Judicial Circuit, and Associate Judge of 
the Maryland Court of Appeals. 

Judge Marbury is a resident of Laurel 
and has served Prince Georges county as 
Attorney for the Board of Education. At- 
torney for the County Commissioners, and 
as City Solicitor for Laurel. 

Moj. Gen. Robt. H. Mills 

A member of the dental profession who 
concentrated on an active and prominent 
military career as well, is Major General 
Robert H. Mills, United States Army, re- 
tired (Dent. '07). 

Upon graduation Dr. Mills entered prac- 
tice in Monticello, Florida. In 1909, he 
joined the Army Dental Corps as a Con- 
tract Dental Surgeon. 

Ordered to the Philippine Islands in 
1910. he served under the command of 
General Pershing on Jolo Island. He saw 
duty in France during World War I. From 
1925 to 1928 served again in the Philip- 
pines. 

General Mills was Director of the Army 
Dental School of the Army Medical 
School in Washington for four years. At 
the outbreak of World War II he was 
on duty at Headquarters. Ninth Service 
Command. San Francisco. Promoted to 
Brigadier General and Assistant Surgeon 
General, he was, in 1942, Chief of Dental 
Service. USA. 

It was in September, 1943 that the dis- 
tinguished Maryland graduate was pro- 
moted to the rank of Major General, the 
first dental officer ever to be promoted to 
that grade. For his service during World 
War II, he received the Distinguished 
Service Medal. 

In 1946, General Mills received an hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Science from 



the University of Maryland and retired 
from the service after 37 years of active 

duty. 

George E. Bennett, M.D 

Considered by members of his profession 
to be the outstanding orthopedic surgeon 
in the country is Dr. George E. Bennett, 
(Med. '09). He received his honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Science from Maryland 
in 1941. 

Only three years after his graduation 
from the University Medical School Dr. 
Bennett began practice in association with 
Doctors William S. Baer and Frederick H. 
Baetjer. These two are credited with aid- 
ing Dr. Bennett immeasurably in his early 
work in bone surgery. 

Currently Adjunct Professor Emeritus 
of Orthopedic Surgery for the Johns Hop- 
kins University School of Medicine, the 
Baltimore doctor holds numerous profes- 
sional titles, as well as membership in 
many prominent medical organizations. He 
has been connected almost continually 
with the Johns Hopkins school since 1914. 
The medical director of Baltimore's Chil- 
dren Hospital School, he is visiting ortho- 
pedic surgeon for The Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital. Union Memorial Hospital, Hospital 
for the Women of Maryland, and Church 
Home and Hospital. 

He has served as president of many in- 
stitutions and organizations including the 
Baltimore League for Crippled Children 
and Adults, the American Academy of 
Orthopedic Surgeons, and the American 
Orthopedic Association. He also held the 
post of Medical Director of the Robert 
Garrett Hospital Dispensary, and during 
World War II was chairman of the Na- 
tional Research Council's subcommittee on 
Orthopedic Surgery. 

Mahlon N. Haines 

One of the nation's outstanding business- 
men, is Mahlon N. Haines, (Agriculture 
'96) owner of the Haines Shoe Company 
the largest individually owned chain of 
shoe stores in the country. 

In addition to his business, and such 
past-times as farming, ranching, and news- 
paper writing, Mr. Haines' energy and re- 
sources have been devoted to his church, 
the Boy Scouts of America, and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Recently he contributed generously to 
the University Memorial Chapel and is 
now taking the lead in support of an ad- 
joining Memorial Garden. He is a Na- 
tional Councilman of the Boy Scouts and 
has served both youth and adult organi- 
zations tirelessly. In 1948. he sponsored a 
community brotherhood banquet attended 
by thousands representing many races and 
creeds. 

He is a Mason, Knight Templar and 
Shriner. Mr. Haines' company raises its 
own cattle, tans its own leather, makes 
its own shoes, and markets them in its 
own stores, its slogan "the company's 
operation is from hoof to hoof and that's 
no bull." 



Robert White 

An executive with one of the country's 
largest and widely-known business enter- 
prises is Robert White. ( Agric. '16). 

Mr. White is production manager of the 
Fertilizer Works of Armour and Company, 
He has been with the same company since 
1919 when he was hired as head chemist 
of the Fertilizer Division of Armour in 
Baltimore. He later became chief chemist 
and plant manager of the company's Car- 
teret . New Jersey plant . 

Transferred to the general headquarters 
of the company in Atlanta, Georgia in 
1934, he assumed duties as general super- 
intendent of all the business's plants then 
numbering 24. In his present job, he is 
production manager in charge of 32 such 
plants, with one each in Puerto Rico and 
Cuba. 

Dr. Robert L. Swain 

Outstanding in the pharmaceutical pro- 
fession is Dr. Robert L. Swain, editor of 
the well-known professional publication, 
"Drug Topics", since 1939. 

Dr. Swain also holds the unique distinc- 
tion of having been graduated also from 
the University's School of Law; Pharmacy 
'09, Law '32. 

For many years secretary-treasurer of 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, Dr. 
Swain has served as president of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Na- 
tional Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 
and the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. He was Deputy Food and Drug 
Commissioner, Maryland Department of 
Health, from 1922 to 1940. 

His honorary degrees include a Doctor 
of Laws from Temple University, Doctor 
of Science from Washington College, 
Master of Pharmacy from the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy and Science, and 
Doctor of Pharmacy from the College of 
Pharmacy of the University of Connec- 
ticut. 

He has been a member of the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education since 
1934. and has served as a member of the 
American Foundation of Pharmaceutical 
Education since 1940. In 1950, he received 
the University of Maryland's Pharmacy 
Alumni Distinguished Service Award. 

George A. Bunting 

Famed as one of the country's leading 
pharmacists and businessmen is George A. 
Bunting, (Pharmacy '99) president and 
chairman of the board of the well-known 
Noxema Chemical Company of Baltimore. 

Concluding his work at the School of 
Pharmacy in two years where he was 
Valedictorian of his class, he began as a 
four dollar a week errand boy and soda 
fountain attendant at 26 years of age. 

He is the father of the "little blue jar" 
containing Noxema, the initial mixture of 
which was prepared in an old coffee pot. 
Organizing his company in 1917, he soon 
assumed the presidency and chairmanship 
of the board. 

He early became a noted figure in 
pharmaceutical affairs and served as presi- 
dent of the Maryland Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation in 1916. He was a member of 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy from 
1922 to 1934. 

Other organizations to which Mr. Bun- 
ting belongs include the National Associa- 
tion of Retail Druggists, Maryland Acad- 



[9] 



emy of Sciences. University Club of 
Baltimore, Eastern Shore Society, and the 
Proprietary Association. 

He directs a company which annually 
sells over forty million "little blue jars". 
Dr. Bunting has gone a long, long way 
since that old coffee pot. 

Lt. Col. Mary Gavin 

Lieutenant Colonel Mary Gavin, (Nurs- 
ing '08) the "angel of mercy" in charge 
of the University of Maryland's overseas 
hospital unit during World War I, was 
graduated from the University in 1908. 

Miss Gavin served as Chief Nurse of 
Base Hospital No. 42. AEF, located at 
Bazoilles-siir-Meuse in France — a unit also 
served by the forementioned Miss Connor. 
When this Maryland unit returned to the 
United States early in 1919, Miss Gavin 
remained in Fiance for further service 
with the Allied Expeditionary Forces. She 
arrived in the United States late in the 
same year. 

She served in the Army Nurse Corps 
for more than 26 years. Before her Army 
service, she had engaged in general and 
private duty nursing in Baltimore. 

During her long service with the U.S. 
Army, Miss Gavin was assigned to numer- 
ous Army hospitals both in and out of 
the United States. Her final assignment 
was as Chief of Army Nurse Corps Section. 
Headquarters Fourth Service Command. 
Atlanta, Georgia, comprising seven south- 
ern states. 

She was promoted to the rank of Cap- 
tain, ANC, in 1940, and to Lieutenant 
Colonel on March 31, 1943. She retired 
from active service on August 31. 1944 
with her latter rank. She now lives in 
New York City. 

Edgar W. Montell 

A Maryland graduate who has distin- 
guished himself in both agriculture and 
business is Edgar YV. Montell (Agr. '15) 
of Edgewater Park. New Jersey. 

A Vice President for Campbell Soup, 
Mr. Montell earlier headed the Agricul- 
tural and Ag. Research Department and 
is now in the Procurement Section. Prior 
to joining Campbell he was with the 
US. Department of Agriculture and served 
as County Agricultural Agent for Mary- 
land's Dorchester county. 

He attended Oregon Agricultural Col- 
lege for two years after graduating from 
Maryland. There he received his Masters 
in Horticulture. He was 2nd lieutenant 
of Infantry Corps in World War I. 

He began his association with the Camp- 
bell Soup Company in 1925 as an assistant 
purchasing agent and agricultural field 
representative. 

He is a member of the Union League of 
Philadelphia, New Jersey Horticultural and 
Agricultural Societies, American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science. He 
is formerly of the Raw Products Commit- 
tee of the National Canners Association. 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning 

One of the country's most prominent 
pharmaceutical executives is Henry A. B. 
Dunning (Pharm. '97) chairman of the 
board of the Baltimore firm of Hynson, 
Westcott, and Dunning. 

Responsible for the development of 
many products which have become im- 
portant in therapeutic work. Dr. Dunning 
first joined the Baltimore company in 



1894 when it was Hynson, Westcott, and 
Company. He purchased part of the 
business in 1901. 

He was Awarded a Doctor of Pharmacy 
degree at the Centennial Commencement 
of the University of Maryland in 1940, 
and received a Doctor of Science from 
the University the following year. 

Dr. Dunning's activities are many and 
varied and include participation in out- 
standing philanthropies. He established 
the first scholarship in schools of pharmacy 
in the United States for graduate work, 
providing $1,000 a year for the recipient. 
and maintains a practice of donating 15% 
of his annual income for charitable pur- 
poses. He personally established the 
Science Building at Washington College 
in Chestertown, Md., and was the sole 
contributor to the National Memorial to 
pharmacists who have served in the wars of 
this country. The latter is located on 
Constitution avenue in Washington, D.C. 

Prof. Elaine K. Weaver 

The Maryland Home Economics Asso- 
ciation's first certificate for research and 
teaching, awarded in 1950, went to Mrs. 
Elaine Knowles Weaver, (H. Ec. '31) 
currently associate professor of home eco- 
nomics at Ohio State University. 

This award was a tribute to the noted 
Maryland alumna who has been extremely 
active in the field of home economics. 

Before assuming her present position, 
which she has held since 1947, Mrs. Weaver 
served as assistant professor of home 
economics at Cornell University and at 
the Teachers' College of Columbia Univer- 
sity. She had been an instructor at Cornell 
since 1938 when she received her Master 
of Science. She was awarded her Ph.D. 
from Cornell in 1944. 

She has served as member of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors, Ohio Home Economics Association, 
American Home Economics Association, 
and Society for the Advancement of 
Management. 

Mrs. Weaver has acted as home econo- 
mics consultant for several companies and 
has written more than 70 articles for 
various publications. She married James 
A. Weaver, an industrial engineer, in 1946. 
They have one four-year-old son, John 
David. 

Dr. Chos. W. Sylvester 

A University alumnus who has distin- 
guished himself in educational work in 
his home state is Charles W. Sylvester, 
assistant superintendent for vocational 
education for the Baltimore City Public 
Schools. 

Dr. Sylvester was graduated from the 
Maryland Agricultural College with a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering 
in 1908 and was honored by the University 
of Maryland in 1948 when he was awarded 
an honorary Doctor of Science degree. 

He has served in his present office since 
1947, and has been employed by the Balti- 
more City Public Schools since 1922. Previ- 
ous to 1947, he was Director of Vocational 
Education for the Baltimore schools. He 
directs a division responsible for all phases 
of vocational education and heads the 
city's public school cafeterias, which feed 
35.000 pupils daily. 

Dr. Sylvester has been active in many 
civic and educational organizations. Since 
1929. he has served consecutivelv and con- 



tinuously as president, member of the exec- 
utive committee, or treasurer of the Mary- 
land State Teachers' Association. He also 
has acted as president of the Maryland 
Vocational Association and has been treas- 
urer of the American Vocational Associa- 
tion for the last 25 years. 

He has served as president of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Association 
and is currently president of the Maryland 
Alumni Club of Baltimore. 

Anne R. Matthews 

A feminine graduate of the University 
who has more than distinguished herself 
in her chosen profession is Miss Anne R. 
Matthews, (A.&S. '29) chief nutritionist 
of the Department of Health of the State 
of Maryland. 

A native of the Eastern shore of Mary- 
land, Miss Matthews holds an M.S. in 
Nutrition from Columbia University and 
an M.P.H. in Public Health from Harvard. 

She has served in her present capacity 
with her home state government since 
1946. Prior thereto she served two years 
as a dietitian in the U.S. Army Medical 
Corps, and for a year and a half as 
assistant director of nutrition for the 
Eastern Area, American Red Cross. 

Miss Matthews taught high school home 
economics for more than six years, and 
served for five years as nutrition specialist 
in the extension service of Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

During World II, she acted as Consultant 
for Hospital Dietitians in 18 general and 
station hospitals in England. She has 
served as Food Director for National Girl 
Scout Camps. 

Michael B. Messore, DDS 

A Maryland graduate who has distin- 
guished himself in the dental profession 
is Dr. Michael B. Messore, (Dent. '30) 
formerly president of the Rhode Island 
State Dental Society and currently a 
member of the State Board of Dental 
Examiners. 

Dr. Messore is noted for his sponsorship 
of the present Dental Practices Act of 
Rhode Island, nationally recognized as 
model legislation for its protection of the 
public and the dental profession. 

During World War II he served three 
years as Group Dental Surgeon with the 
Army Air Force. 

The well-known New England dental 
surgeon has participated in numerous poli- 
tical and civic activities as well as those 
pertaining to his profession. He served 
two years in the City Council of Provi- 
dence, and four years in the Rhode Island 
House of Representatives. For a year, he 
was a member of his state's Unemployment 
Relief Commission. In regards to civic 
groups he served as vice president of the 
Providence Gridiron Club for two years, 
is a member of the Netopian Club of 
Rhode Island, the Air Force Association, 
the Rhode Island Historical Society, and 
the Dental Staff of the Rhode Island 
Hospital. 

Bernice Connor 

A lady who has done much to hold 
high the nursing profession is Miss Bernice 
Connor, (Nursing '12). 

In addition to such distinctions as having 

been the first Public Health worker in 

Baltimore county, sponsor of the Social 

Service Department of the University of 

(Concluded on pape 18) 



[10] 





FLAGS OF THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE 



Washington's cruisers flew 
this "Appeal to Heaven" flag. 
It was mentioned in English 
newspapers and was familiar on 
the seas. A coiled rattlesnake 
under the pine tree appeared on 
some of these flags. 



Armed ships out of New York 
as early as 1775 flew this flag, 
the beaver representing indus- 
try as well as the fur trade. The 
beaver was used on the seal of 
New Amsterdam and later on 
the seals of New York. 



The maritime state of Rhode 
Island had its own flag. It saw 
action at Brandywine, Trenton 
and Yorktown. The white stars 
on a blue field later appear in 
our National Ensign. Rhode 
Island's state flag today is 
similar. 



This flag was carried into ac- 
tion by Revolutionary troops. 
The banner was red with a 
white jack bearing a green pine 
tree. It is now on display at 
Annapolis. Most colonial mili- 
tary units carried individual 
standards. 




KEY'S INSPIRATION 

This flag, made by Mary Young Pickersgill 
and her 14 year old daughter, Caroline, on the 
malt house floor of Clagett's Brewery in Balti- 
more, is the original Fort McHenry battle flag, 
ane of its fifteen stars shot away. This ensign 
inspired the writing of "The Star Spangled 
Banner." The flag is now on exhibition at the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



MOST any grade school youngster knows 
that Francis Scott Key. of Maryland, 
wrote "The Star Spangled Banner." Fewer 
realize that the actual flag that inspired 
the anthem was also the handiwork of 
Marylanders. Still fewer know that, but 
for the effort of three people very close 
to the University of Maryland, "The Star 
Spangled Banner" might not have, by act 
of Congress, been made the official anthem 
of the United States, an event that did not 
take place until 1933! 

The story of the writing of "The Star 
Spangled Banner" is one of the most in- 
teresting in the picturesque and colorful 
history of Maryland, one of the thirteen 
original states. 

Stotes With "Color" 

There are many grand chapters in the 
Maryland story that have come in for 
little enough glory, probably because 
Marylanders themselves take the history 
of their great State for granted. 

That is nothing new, of course. Native 
Waahingtonians seldom bother about 
climbing the Washington monument, leav- 
ing that to the visitors. 

Some years ago Irving Berlin, after an 



OLD GLORY AND MARYLAND 

"The Star Spangled Banner/' Written by a Marylander In- 
spired by a Flag Made by Maryland Women. Made Official 
by Act of Congress Based Upon Effort of Marylanders Close 

to the University 

By Lucille M. Bernard 



~J/\ /'"'"V/Tlff / 






mortalize in song. Kentucky. Maryland. 
Virginia, Carolina. Georgia. California; 
such states inspire songs. Not all of them 
do that." 

Greatest of All 

Probably the most greatly inspired song 
of all time is our National anthem. 

Peoples of all nations, races and colors, 
know that star spangled banner is the ban- 
ner of freedom and the hope of the world. 

There are only two places in the United 
States where the flag is permitted to fly 
night and day. One is over the dome of 
the Capitol in Washington, D. C. The other 
is over the grave of Francis Scott Key, 
at Frederick, Maryland. 






FAMED IN HISTORY 



"// Any One Attempts To Haul Down The 
American Flag, Shoot Him On The Spot." 

The above is the original order of Gen. John 
A. Dix, Secretary of the Treasury, to Mr. Wil- 
liam H. Jones, his personal representative who 
had proceeded to the Gulf Coast prior to the 
outbreak of the Civil War to save, if possible, 
the revenue (Coast Guard) cutters then sta- 
tioned in those waters. The above quotation 
has become famous in American history. 



afternoon of Stephen Foster music, was 
asked. "Why are there not more 'state' 
songs like 'My Old Kentucky Home.'? 
Beautiful numbers that will last?"' 

"There are very few states," replied 
Berlin, "possessing color sufficient to im- 




FRANCIS SCOTT KEY 

Author of "The Star Spangled Banner." 



11 



& 






Cs J~a-j ab-ej //£*■<<- <f7Z*-~ j/.**t-*<£> &*.*^,^r~ *e^~~ '-■ 







rt. f~^> f?*rA~. t^ttA'-f^'rt-tr*^! 



^P\^ 7%L 4 £rT^M- "^~~^ ^<^~- ^NT^| 







j£-< 










rf^. 



C4- fce—i^.*- 



- ^ &*&<£. * <^j£^. 



-***» ->w> 










"rftZ." &fut^£*^e t^_ Sr£astA*^_ 







C&*,/z~*^. fez?- ^^ *£ 

"IN GOD IS OUR TRUST" 

Facsimile of the original manuscript of "The Star Spangled Banner" in which Francis Scott Key 
coined the national motto, "In God is Our Trust". Many nations, down through the ages, iiave 
claimed God on their side in war. Note the qualifying line in Key's manuscript, "Conquer we must, 
when our cause it is just". 






Key, accompanied by John S. Skinner 
of Baltimore, had boarded the British flag 
ship "Tonnant" to negotiate for the release 
of Dr. William S. Beanes, a 65 year old 
resident of Upper Marlboro who had been 
incarcerated, charged with hostile actions 
toward British troops. Key was then 35, 
Skinner 26. Just two young Marylanders 
trying to help an older Marylander. The 
three were transferred to the British cartel 
ship "Surprize." 

On the "Surprize" Key kept vigil during 
the long hours of the night as the British 
fleet bombarded the stout walls of Fort 
McHenry. The fort protected Baltimore, 
the city the British called "The Hornet's 
Nest" because it sent to sea, at President 



Madison's request, more privateers than 
any other port in America. 

Dr. Beanes' Question 

Old Fort McHenry stood up well, its 
walls made of brick set in oystershell 
mortar were fourteen feet high and thirty- 
five feet thick. 

"Oh, say can you see," asked Dr. Beanes, 
addressing Key, "the flag?" 

The morning fog lifted and by "the 
dawn's early light" Key saw the flag and 
the verses of the national anthem began, 
in his mind, to take form. 

Back in Baltimore, after having been 
released from the cartel ship, Key sat 
alone in an inn. He wrote later, "I sat 
alone with my God." In those quiet hours 



he began his immortal poem with Dr. 
Beanes 1 question: 

"0 say can yon sec by the dawn's early 

light 
"What so proudly we hail'd at the twi- 
light's last gleaming, 
"Whose broad stripes and bright stars 

through the perilous fight 
"O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so 

gallantly streaming? 
"And the rocket's red glare, the bombs 

bursting in air. 
"Gave proof through the night that our 

flag teas still there, 
"0 say docs that star-spangled banner yet 

wave 
"O'i r Iht land of the free and the home 

of the brave? 

The mists lifted and Key caught the 
glimpse of the Maryland-made flag over 
Baltimore's proud fort. He penned: 
"On the shore dimly seen through the 

mists of the deep, 
"Where the foe's haughty host in dread- 
silence reposes, 
"What is that which the breeze, o'er the 

towering steep. 
"As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half 

discloses? 
"Now it catches the gleam of the morn- 
ing's first beam, 
"In full glory reflected now shines in the 

stream, 
" 'Tis the star-spangled banner — long 

may it wave 
"O'er the land of the free and the home of 

the brave! 

Song of Victory 

His third verse was a song of victory as 
well as challenge, as he wrote: 
"And where is that band who so vaunt- 

ingly swore, 
"That the havoc of war and the battle's 

confusion 
"A home and a country should leave us 

no man .' 
"Their blood has wash'd out their foul 

footsteps pollution. 
"No refuge could save the hireling and 

sla ve 
"From the terror of flight of the gloom of 

the gravt . 
"And the star-spangled banner in triumph 

doth wave 
"O'er the land of the free and the home 

of the brave. 

"In God We Trust" 

And finally, devoutly, he accorded full 
meed of credit to his God. the maker and 
breaker of nations. In this stanza he 
coined the motto of the American Gov- 
ernment, "In God We Trust." yet another 
Maryland contribution. Key concluded: 
"0 thus be it ever when freemen shall 

stand 
"Between their lov'd home and the War's 

desolation! 
"Blest with vict'ry and peace may the 

heav'n-rescued land 
"Praise the power that hath made and 

preserved us a nation! 
"Then conquer we must, when our cause 

it is just. 
"And this be our motto — "In God is our 

trust." 
"And the star-spangled banner in triumph 

shall wuri 
"O'er the land of the free and the home of 

the brave." 



12 



BATTLE STANDARDS OF THE COLONIES 



This flag, which is at Annapo- 
lis, was carried at the Battle of 
Bunker Hill and is known as 
the "Bunker Hill Flag." The 
Cross of St. George is red on a 
white field. The pine tree is 
green. The field is blue. 



This is the "Bennington 
Flag." The thirteen stripes are 
white at top and bottom. There 
are thirteen stars. This one was 
carried into action by Ver- 
mont's "Green Mountain Boys" 
on August 16, 1777. 



Yellow, with a black rattle- 
snake and black lettering, was 
this flag flown by Commodore 
Ezek Hopkins. The snake and 
motto appeared on drums of the 
first Marines during recruiting 
in Philadelphia. 



WNIiiHItfttliMiVKr 



Thirteen red and white stripes, 
crossed by a rattlesnake with 
the letters "Dont Tread on Me" 
was flown by the South Caro- 
lina Navy, by the Minute Men 
of Culpeper, Va., and by John 
Paul Jones. 



And the star-spangled banner, the flag 
itself; the one that flew over McHenry? 
That too was a Maryland contribution to 
the world. The flag, later pierced by Brit- 
ish shell, had been made by a Maryland 
widow. Mary Young Pickersgill. with the 
aid of her 14 year old daughter, Caroline. 

The ensign was made at the joint re- 



& FLAG "DON'TS" 




Do not use the Flag 
as drapery for a 
speaker's platform or 
similar use. Use bunt- 



^fci's^RSt&^Ssas d not display the 
Flag on a float in a parade except from a 
staff. 

Do not drape the Flag over the hood, 
top, sides, or back of a vehicle, railroad 
train, or boat. When displayed on a motor 
car, the flagstaff should be affixed firmly 
to the chassis, or clamped to the radiator 
cap. 

Do not use the Flag as a portion of a 
costume or athletic uniform. Do not put 
it on cushions, handkerchiefs, or boxes. 

Do not put lettering upon the Flag. 

Do not use the Flag in any form of ad- 
vertising or fasten an advertising sign to 
a pole from which the Flag is flown. 

Do not display or store the Flag in such 
manner that it will be soiled or damaged. 
When no longer in condition for use, the 
Flag should be destroyed privately and 
reverently; preferably by burning. 



quest of General John Strieker and Com- 
modore Joshua Barney. 

Strips of white and red and the field of 
blue were cut from bunting laved out on 
the floor of the malt house in Clagett's 
Brewery. The flag measured 29 feet by 
36 feet' 

Mother and daughter worked far into 
many nights, crawling over the massive 
flag, humbly assembling the "broad stripes 
and bright stars" now so famous in song, 
story and history. 

The daughter, Caroline, recalled years 
later that about four hundred yards of 
bunting went into the banner and that 
each of its fifteen white stars measured 
two feet from point to point. The original 
flag may be seen at the Smithsonian In- 
stitution, Washington, D. C. 

"Official" in 1933 

From Fort McHenry that flag could 
be seen for many miles. Today it is rec- 
ognized half a world away and back again. 

Just a little old Maryland widow and 
her small daughter, on their hands and 
knees on a malt house floor! Yes, Irving 
Berlin was right when he spoke of the 
Maryland "color" that makes for song and 
story ! ! ! 

How many appreciate that not until 
March, 1933, was the Star Spangled Ban- 
ner made the official National Anthem of 
the United States of America by an Act 
of the Congress? 

In the early 1900's "Columbia, the Gem 
of the Ocean" and "America" were some- 
times played at morning and evening 
colors. 




HON. MILLARD S. TYDINGS 

University of Maryland Alumnus, then in the 
Senate, contributed greatly toward making 'he 
Star Spangled Banner "official" in 1933. 



For many years the Veterans of For- 
eign Wars assumed the lead in an effort 
to make the Star Spangled Banner the 
official national anthem. Finally there 
were hearings on a bill before Congress 
intended to accomplish that purpose. 

Many and strong forces were against 
the bill. It was contended that the song 
was hard to sing, that the words were 
words of hatred. Forgotten the history, the 
incidents that inspired the words. They 
had something more modern, more "peace- 
ful," more singable. Neither did they like 




DONTGIVE (JP 
THE SHIP 



FORERUNNERS OF TODAY'S FLAG 



The "Grand Union Flag." or 
"First Ensign" preceded the 
Stars and Stripes. This is the 
flag, referred to in the text, 
hoisted by John Paul Jones and 
planted ashore by Marines in 
the Bahamas. 



The first "Stars and Stripes," 
as authorized by Congress, the 
flag of the thirteen United 
States, of thirteen stripes, alter- 
nate red and white and a union 
of thirteen stars, white in a blue 
field, representing a new con- 
stellation. 



The "Fort McHenry Flag," 
star spangled banner, fashioned 
by the hands of Maryland wo- 
men, inspired Francis Scott Key. 
This flag, 15 stars and stripes, 
was flown over Tripoli by U. S. 
Marines and was the flag of 
Andrew Jackson at New Or- 
leans. 



This is Perry's flag on Lake 
Erie. With white letters on a 
blue field, "Dont Give Up The 
Ship" (no apostrophe in 
"Dont"), it was inspired by 
Lawrence's dying words on the 
decks of the "Chesapeake." 



13 



the fact that the music of the anthem was 
from an old English drinking song "Ana- 
creon in Heaven." 

Yes, there were people in powerful posi- 
tions who wanted to pitch Francis Scott 
Kev's anthem right overboard. Just like 
that I 

However, there also were others alert 
and ready to tight to make it official. At 
the hearings musicians played it and tal- 
ented male and female voices sang it in 
various keys. 

Yet the bill, to secure passage, needed 
considerable effort. It required permission 
to have it placed upon the unanimous con- 
sent calendar. That took some work. Calls 
upon Vice President Curtis, president of 
the Senate. Calls upon this Congressman 
and that one. Only ONE negative reply 
was needed to make the Star Spangled 
Banner bill a dead thick. 

Maryland People 

Most of the credit for leading the battle 
for unanimous consent went to three peo- 
ple very close to the University of Mary- 
land. One was Senator Millard S. Tydings, 
Maryland alumnus 
and former member 
of the University's 
Board of Regents. The 
Senator did much of 
the advising on what 
should be done and 
how. 

The second wheel 
horse for the bill was 
the late Congressman 
Stephen W. Gambrill, 
Prince Georges 
County, also a Mary- 
land alumnus. He 
guided the workers for the bill and steered 
them right. 

The third worker was Mrs. Clay Keene 
Miller, wife of a Maryland faculty mem- 
ber. Mrs. Miller was Regent of Ruth 
Brewster Chapter, D. A. R., and national 
legislative chairman for the Ladies Aux- 
iliaries of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
She spent many days in work for the bill. 
In recognition of her efforts toward mak- 
ing "The Star Spangled Banner" the offi- 
cial national anthem the Governor of her 
native Kentucky appointed her an Hon- 
orary Colonel on the Governor's staff. 

History and historical color? Maryland 
fairly blooms with it. The niches and 
crannies of Maryland history should be 
probed right along and the half forgotten 
chapters of the glorious traditions of the 
Old Line State should be kept alive. 

A Gift to the World 

Written by a Maryland man, inspired 
by a flag made by Maryland women, made 
official through the efforts of Maryland 
people, "The Star Spangled Banner" today 
means more the world over than it has 
ever meant before. 

So long as men love liberty more than 
life itself; so long as they treasure the 
priceless privileges bought with the blood 
of our forefathers; so long as truth, justice 
and charity remain the ideals of human 
hearts, "The Star Spangled Banner" will 
continue to represent the world's greatest 




Miller 



hope for freedom, understanding and 
peace. 

As we stand in reverence for the flag 
or for the official anthem inspired by it 
let us also remember that it was "made 
in Maryland." a Maryland gift to the 
world. 



From Amsterdam 

Ground was broken for a new laboratory 
of the University and the van der Waals 
Laboratory of Amsterdam University, 
Holland. Appropriately, the first spadeful 
of earth was moved by Professor J. D. van 
der Waals, Jr., who is eighty years old, 
and who succeeded his father, J. D. van der 
Waals, Sr., in the chair of Theoretical 
Physics at Amsterdam. The younger van 
der Waals happens to be in America visit- 
ing his daughter. He was persuaded to 
extend his visit in order to take part in 
the ground breaking. 

The new laboratory will be headed by 
Professor A. M. J. F. Michels. of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the van der 
Waals Laboratory in Amsterdam and will 
be devoted to study of interactions be- 
tween molecules. The progress will thus 
include, broadly, study of phenomena 
which are affected by and have effect on 
molecular forces. In the new laboratory, 
which will be ready for use January 1, 
1954, emphasis will be placed upon high- 
pressure and high-precision techniques 
which have been so successfully employed 
by Professor Michels in his work of the 
last thirty years. 



Library News 



Mrs. Marguerite Ritchie, Engineering 
Librarian, attended the Workshop on the 
Production and Use of Technical Reports 
to be held at Catholic University of Amer- 
ica. The workshop is sponsored not only 
by Catholic University, but also by the 
American Chemical Society, the American 
Documentation Institute, the Special 
Libraries Association and the National 
Science Foundation. 

Dr. Gladys Wiggin representing the 
teaching faculty, Miss Mary Urban repre- 
senting the library, and Mr. Keith S. 
Donnellan representing the students at- 
tended a conference at Goucher College, 
on "The College Library in a Changing 
World." The Conference marked the 
dedication and opening of the Julia Rogers 
Library located on the new Towson 
campus. 



Diamondback Wins 

The Diamondback won All-American 
rating in the Associated Collegiate Press 
contest, accumulating 45 points over the 
minimum of 1,000 needed for the superior 
rating. 

One judge rated the Diamondback st}de 
"as professional as I have ever seen in a 
college paper." 

The ACP conducts contests for all types 
of college publications biannually. 



Trees for Japan 

"Trees for the Forest of Peace," was the 
theme of a ceremony staged at the Uni- 
versity with the joint participation of The 
Japanese Embassy, the Japanese-American 
Citizens League. The Department of State, 
The Voice of America, and the Holly 
Society of America. 

The holly trees dedicated on this occa- 
sion are to be shipped to Japan just 44 
years since Japan's cherry blossom trees 
were planted in Washington, D. C. 

Speakers at the holly exercises were Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, President; Roger Pease, 
Horticulturist, West Virginia; John Wister. 
Scott Horticultural Foundation, Swath- 
more College, Pennsylvania; Professor 
Robert Clark, Rutgers University, New 
Jersey; Mrs. Barbara Piegari, Twin Brook. 
Maryland; Professor Carl Johnson. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 



Maryland Band 

After marching through Washington. D. 
C. in the annual Cherry Blossom Parade, 
a few members of the Red and White Band 
nursed sore muscles. 

Maryland's marching ambassadors, di- 
rected by Lt. Robert L. Landers, partici- 
pated in the parade along with such 
organizations as the Air Force and Marine 
Bands. This is not the first time this year 
that the band has marched in the District 
of Columbia. On January 20. the AFROTC 
and the band were in the Inaugural Parade. 

Marching in parades is only one of this 
organization's activities. Last fall the band 
gave color to Terp gridiron clashes, while 
throughout the year it adds spirit to pep 
rallies. 

On April 30, the group climaxed its sea- 
son with their annual home concert. At 
that time, Sergeant Bill Jones of the Sing- 
ing Sergeants was soloist. George Gersh- 
win's "Rhapsody in Blue" was featured. 

The band, organized in 1909 as an ROTC 
unit of 19 musicians, has grown to an 
organization of over 100 members. It has 
increased in reputation as well as size. 
After it performed at the 1951-52 Sugar 
Bowl, Charlie Zatarin, president of the 
Sugar Bowl committee, stated that out of 
the 38 bands that have participated in the 
Sugar Bowl the Maryland band was the 
best. 

All band activities are under the direc- 
tion of Bill Dunsman, president; Bill Fisk, 
student director; Bill Stokes, drum major; 
Betty Woodard, head majorette; Clarence 
Reynolds, vice president ; and Jean Ends- 
low, secretary. 



Seniors Smallest 

The senior class remains the smallest 
at the University with 911 and the fresh- 
man class the largest with 2,181. The junior 
class numbers 942 and the sophomore, 
1,623. 

The freshman class dropped 361 going 
into the second semester. 



[14] 



UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 

ALUMNI CLUBS 



"The Hasty Heort" 

Sponsorship of "The Hasty Heart" pre- 
sented by the University Theater 
Group was undertaken by the Baltimore 

and lower Eastern Shore Alumni Club. 
John Patrick's great play concerning 
heroes of World War II was well pre- 
sented by Maryland's student actors. The 
project was undertaken by the two chilis 
to bring an excellent student group to 
the alumni of the University and to create 
a cross-interest between the alumni and 
student organization. 

The Baltimore presentation was held at 
the Xorthwood School auditorium. Typi- 
cal alumni reaction. "The Theater Group 
could not have done a more superb or 
sincere job had they been playing to a 
Manding-room only audience at the Ford 
Theater." 

An enthusiastic alumni gathering saw 
the production at the State Teacher's 
College in Salisbury. Alumni were so 
favorably impressed, they assured a packed 
house for next year if the Theater Group 
agrees to return with another play. 

Officers of the Saint Andrew's Society 
were in attendance for the Baltimore 
presentation and expressed particular ap- 
proval of James Radonski's lead as the 
Scottish "Lachlen." The group requested 
a May production of the play for the 
Society of Scotsmen which includes Gov- 
ernor McKeldin in its membership. 

In addition to Radonski, the unusually 
fine cast included Floyd Peterson, Jerry 
Gough. John Powell, L. Parker Fairlamb, 
Donald Peacock. John Yeabower, Rhea 
Mermelstein, and Andrew Burgoyne. The 
University Theater Staff is under the same 
direction of Warren L. Strausbaugh and 
the play was directed by Dr. G. Charles 
Xeimeyer. The settings were handled by 
Earl Meeker. Assisting in the production 
was Bernhardt Works and the Company 
Manager was Rudolph Pugliese. The Pro- 
duction Staff included Assistant Director 
William J. Gough, Stage Manager Stanley 
Kruger. Lights — Bill Price, and Properties 
— Caroline Hogan. 

Pittsburgh Banquet 

Seventy-five Alumni of the Pittsburgh 
area joined for a banquet on Feb. 6. which 
featured Coach Jim Tatum and a number 
of the present and past Maryland Football 
greats from the Pittsburgh section. 

The social and the banquet which fol- 
lowed were under the direction of Presi- 
dent Gordon Kessler, Vice-President 
Martin L. Brotemarkle and entertainment 
Chairman, Charles S. Furtney. 

A highlight of the occasion came in the 
form of recollections of College days by 
Rev. J. Lawrence Plumley. Special greet- 
ings were brought by H. H. Goodman, 
President of the Terrapin Club, and 
Alumni Secretary, Dave Brigham. Movies 
of the Maryland-Navy game were shown 
by Assistant Coach Jack Hennemier. 




MICHIGAN 



RE* S 









RJ8&S 



^ass^s* 1 



A secure future, exceptional opportunities for 
advancement, and an excellent starting salary await you at 
Fairchild, if you are one of the men we are looking for. 
We have openings right now for qualified engineers and 
designers in all phases of aircraft engineering; we need 
top-notch men to help us in our long-range military 
program: turning out the famous C-119 Flying Boxcars 
and other projects for the U. S. Air Force. 

Fairchild provides paid vacations and liberal health and 
life insurance coverage. We work a 5-day, 40-hour week 
as a base. Premium is paid when longer work week is 
scheduled. 



■1 ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION 

lAIRCHILD ffiwudDmim 



HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



"An organ hreathes in every groove; 
And the full heart's a Psalter 
Rich in deep hymn of gratitude and lore." 
HOOD— ODE TO RAE WILSON 

The beautiful organ music in Maryland's new 
chapel is provided by a three manual 
Moller pipe organ. This, and every Mollerorgan 
is built by master craftsmen — unexcelled in 
their field. When your church needs an organ 
remember the name — Moller. 

For information and demonstration, please write: 




(MP 

INCORPORATED 

Renowned for Pipe Organs Since 1875 

HAGERSTOWN. MARYLAND 




THE COLLEGIATE PUBLISHING COMPANY 



Printers and 
Publishers of fine 
Books ■ Catalogs 
Viewbooks - etc. 




546 S. Longwood St. 

Baltimore 23, Md. 

Gilmor 5-3517 



15 




A casual campus commentator once re- 
marked, possibly facetiously, "A 
University consists of brains, brick and 
tradition". Granted that, of the three, 
brick is probably the least important, the 
history of brick in Maryland, prominent 
as it is in the University's Georgian 
Colonial red brick buildings, is of con- 
siderable interest. 

Made from one of earth's most abun- 
dant raw materials, the common clay brick 
is a key factor in our present-day life. 

Early chroniclers were high in their 
praise of this article, and gave abundant 
testimony to its worth. Almost a century 
and a quarter ago the matter-of-fact civil 
engineer Charles Varle, in his "View of 
Baltimore" declared, "The best bricks in 
the United States are manufactured in 
Baltimore, and the exportation of that 
branch of industry is now considerable." 
Half a century later George Howard in 
his "Monumental City" went even further. 
He covered not only the United States 
but the entire earth when he wrote, "Bal- 
timore pressed bricks are superior to any 
made in the world," adding that our bricks 
were shipped to "all seaport towns." Other 
cities according to Howard used a greater 
number than did Baltimore itself. 

300 Years Ago 

To arrive at the beginning of the brick 
industry in Maryland and Baltimore we 
must go back more than 300 years. 

The oldest house in Maryland is said 
to be Cross Manor, erected about 1643 or 
1644. It stands on the Western Shore 



of Maryland on St. Inigoes Creek about 
five miles south of St. Mary's City — 
individualistic, warm and likeable — erected 
nearly a hundred years before Baltimore 
Town was laid out. "It survives time and 
the elements and grows old graciously and 
beautifully, mellowed by the passage of 
centuries." This stately old mansion was 
built of brick. 

Baltimore's first brick house, unfortu- 
nately for those who admire the handi- 
work of past generations, was early swept 
away to make room in the city's growth. 

It was erected in 1740 by a gentleman 
from Ireland named Edward Fottrell, who 
"imported the materials and erected the 
first brick house with freestone corners, 
and the first which was two stories without 
a hip-roof in the town." according to the 
historian Scharf. It stood near the north- 
west corner of what is now Calvert and 
Fayette streets. Loyalist, Mr. Fottrell 
returned to England at the outbreak of 
the Revolution, and his house was confis- 
cated and sold. Some of the Acadian 
refugees found shelter under its roof, it 
is said, and other romantic stories cluster 
around it. 

From Abroad 

Scharf, Baltimore's most celebrated 
chronicler, does not fail to point a moral 
from the fact that the bricks used in the 
building of this house were brought over 
from the mother county. "Our worthy 
forefathers did not. at this period, arrive 
at the statue of so high a fact as to be- 
lieve . . . that they were daily walking 
over a soil that was destined to be fa- 



shioned into the material of a beautiful 
city, whose architectural renown should be 
in some degree connected with the un- 
rivalled excellence of its bricks," he chides. 
It is true, of course, that some of the 
earliest of Maryland's colonial manors 
were erected with bricks especially im- 
ported as ship's ballast from Great Britain, 
but the importation of English brick was 
not a common practice. The late Charles 
Fickus. for many years secretary of the 
Maryland Historical Society, made an ex- 
haustive examination of the manifests of 
vessels arriving in Chesapeake waters over 
a long period, and found no ground for 
the belief that in early Maryland it was 
necessary to rely upon foreign bricks for 
building material. It was Mr. Fickus' con- 
tention that this belief took hold and has 
continued because the bricks then used 
were known as "English." The term "Eng- 
lish," however, referred not to the fact 
that the brick was made in England but 
that it was modeled after the style com- 
mon to that country, as contrasted with 
"Dutch" brick, fashioned in larger mould 
English brickmakers. it should be recalled, 
were among the early tradesmen to arrive 
in Maryland. 

Kilns Nearby 

In the days when Maryland was young, 
and even in the time when Baltimore itself 
was only a lusty infant, brick for the dwell- 
ings of our citizens was commonly made 
within a short distance of the site selected 
for the structure. This presented no great 
difficulty as suitable clay was almost every- 



i6; 



where in evidence. It also seems to be true 
that, while demand for brickmakers was 
constantly growing, none for a long while 
set up as independent manufacturers, sup- 
plying their wares to the public at large 
Instead, brickmakers operated for such in- 
dividuals as required their services on 
that individual's own property. In the 
early days, when Maryland was relatively 
undeveloped, this was a natural condition; 
but as time passed and larger communi- 
ties formed, emergence of the brick mak- 
ing industry on a commercial scale was a 
question of time. 

We do not know who was Maryland's 
tii>t public brickmaker. Doubtless, the 
transition from private employee to public 
operator was very gradual. A yard was 
set up to supply bricks for a special dwell- 
ing, the owner probably contracting for 
the work with an overseer skilled in the 
trade. With the yard in condition for 
further work, another builder in the 
vicinity might seek an arrangement with 
the original owner to manufacture his sup- 
ply as well. As a town like Baltimore grew 
in size and wealth, with new demands for 
brick, thus in all likelihood arose the pub- 
lic yard. 

First Advertiser 

The first Maryland brickmaker to adver- 
tise his wares was William Vennell. In 
the November 10, 1757 issue of The Mary- 
land Gazette— 123 years after The Ark and 
The Dove landed at St. Mary's City- 
appeared this notice : 

"WILLIAM V E X X E L L. BRIC K- 
MAKER, living near Annapolis, gives this 
Public Xotice, that he will make BRICKS, 
and Burn them, anil stand to the Loss, at 
2/6 per Thousand, the Employer finding 
him Provisions and Hands: the Hands to 
consist of Two Men and Three Boys." 

A quarter of a century passed after Ven- 
nell inserted this advertisement before Bal- 
timore Town was heard from. Then, in the 
February 24th issue of The Maryland 
Journal for the year 1784. 50 years after 
Baltimore Town had been incorporated 
and when it had 10,000 inhabitants there 
was this notice: 

"BRICK-MOULDERS AXD LABOUR- 
ERS wanted on Hire. Five or six Brick- 
Moulders, who are Masters of their busi- 
ness are wanted on Hire. Such Persons, on 
application to JOHX SHRIVER, Brick- 
Maker, in Baltimore-Town, will meet with 
great encouragement. 

"Said SHRIVER likewise wants to em- 
ploy Fourteen or Fifteen hearty industri- 
ous young Men." 

Crude Method 

A year later, March 11, 1785, one Jacob 
Shriver advertised in the same publica- 
tion : 

"WAXTED. Seven or Eight BRICK- 
MAKERS, who are Masters of their Busi- 
ness, and SIX LABOURERS . . . they 
may have constant employment from the 
First Day of April next, for SEVEX 
MOXTHS; and for further encourage- 
ment, shall be paid their Wages Monthly, 
and meet with the best Treatment from 
Jacob Shriver, Brickmaker in Baltimore. 

The method employed in the produc- 
tion of brick up to the middle of the nine- 
teenth century was certainly crude if we 
apply present-day standards. But the 
bricks, nevertheless, made were good 



enough to stand the lest of time and the 
elements as proved by many noble brick 
structures of that era that survive today 
and seem only to grow richer and mel- 
lower with age. 

Xo machinery was then used in the 
manufacture of bricks. A site containing 
suitable clay was selected. Sometimes the 
clay was dug the preceding fall and al- 
lowed to stand exposed during the winter 
months in order to rid it of impurities. 
Usually, the clay was dug in the spring, or 
shortly before it was used. 

Many of the largest Baltimore yards 
were operated to the west and south of 
the inner harbor. It was an advantage to 
be located near the water, for the owner 
could obtain cheap water transportation, 
and at the same time receive by boal the 
large supply of wood required to burn the 
brick. Thus, in the March 11th, 1788 issue 
of "The Maryland Journal" John Mickle 
and John M'Donogh, evidently partners, 
advertised for rent "that Commodius 
BRICK-YARD, situate at the South-West 
Corner of the Basin. There is Clay dug 
for about 150,000 Brick, and the digging 
will be continued until there is a sufficient 
quantity dug for the Season. The good- 
ness of the Clay, the Advantages of tin- 
wharf adjoining the Yard, being free for 
landing Wood, and vending Bricks by 
Water, must be sufficient to recommend 
the aforesaid Yard to any industrious 
Brickmaker." 

Sale or Lease 

A few years later this same John 
M'Donogh advertised for sale or lease 
"that commoelius la rye BRICK Yard, 
lately occupied by Josiah Brown, with 
Kilns, Sheds, and other implements all 
complete for fire or six gangs of hands, 
and Clay ready dui/ for near one million 
brick; and also two other BRICKYARDS. 
containing near four acres each; all with- 
in the city of Baltimore." 

In one of the older works on Baltimore, 
about 125 years ago, appeared this sum- 
mary of the brick industry of that time. 
"This branch of business has of late years 
become one of peculiar interest to the 
citizens of Baltimore as it presents a means 
of profitable enterprise which at one time 
could by no means have been anticipated. 
. . . The clay in the neighborhood of Bal- 
timore is admirably adapted to be the 
very best in the country." 

Oldest Concern 

It would appear that the oldest existing 




fire brick concern in the United States 
was constructed at Mounl Savage in Alle- 
gheny county, Maryland, in 1841. It is 
incorrect to state, however, as is frequently 
done, that this was the tirst linn in the 
country to make lire brick. It was the 
initial plant to lie erected for this single 
purpose 

To treat in detail the story of the mak- 
ing of brick during (he latter half of the 
past century would require a separate his- 
tory for each of the companies absorbed 
in 1899 by the Baltimore Brick Company. 
Their life history can be combined in the 
statement that, being a basic industry, they 
experienced the same cycles of lessened 
production and business prosperity as did 
the city itself. 

There were 22 local brick manufacturing 
companies which in 1899 merged to form 
the Baltimore Brick Company. The Bal- 
timore Brick Company was organized be- 
fore the advent of the motor truck, and 
horses, mules and carts were used in haul- 
ing the brick. At the turn of the century 
the company owned 200 mules. Usually 
I here were 500 brick hauled on a cart, and 
on occasion mules and carts would be 
strung in long lines along city streets. 

The Baltimore Brick Company has 
played a major role in building modern 
Baltimore and many of the buildings at 
the University of Maryland used Balti- 
more Brick in their construction. 



Final Concert 

The University Chapel Choir joined the 
Xational Symphony Orchestra in the final 
concert of the Suburban Series in the 
Coliseum. The orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Howard Mitchell, accompanied 
Associate Professor Fague Springmann 
who sang the solo baritone portions of 
Brahm's "Requiem". The program in- 
cluded Berlioz's "Roman Carnival" Over- 
ture, Beethoven's "Fifth Symphony", and 
Ravel's "Daphne and Chloe." 

Joint Concert 

A joint concert featured the Cornell 
University Men's Chorus and the Mary- 
land Men's Glee Club in the Coliseum. 

The program included soloist soprano 
Mrs. Carrie Funk. Maryland alumna and 
member of the Women's Chorus. The 
Cornell Chorus was on an extended tour 
of the East coast. 

UT Wins Contest 

Maryland's presentation of William Sa- 
royan's "Hello Out There" won the Award 
of Merit £.t the University of Pennsyl- 
vania's Cultural Olympics. 

The one-act play featured Dick Rym- 
land and Dolly Medlock in the leading 
roles. Others in the cast included Pat 
Kirkpatrick, Vernon DeVinney, and Ed 
Walsh, who was also assistant director. 



At Salisbury 



Salty: — "How many Maryland coeds would 
it take, standing shoulder to shoulder, to reach 
from Washington, D. C. to College Park." 

Sweetie: — "Eight. A miss is as good as a 

mile". 



Dr. Westervelt B. Romaine directed the 
University Men's Glee Club in Salisbury 
before a civic gathering. At the invitation 
of University President Dr. H. C. Byrd, 
the Glee Club sang Randall Thompson's 
"Testament of Freedom", a musical setting 
of four writings of Thomas Jefferson. 



[17] 



SALESMANSHIP JOB 




Pres. Byrd 



American Press Needs to Sell 

U. S. to Europe, says Dr. Byrd 

in Addressing News 

Association 

The United States has undertaken abroad 
the greatest selling job in the history 
of the world and the American press has 
an obligation to give its readers a thorough 
understanding of foreign countries, their 
peoples and their problems, Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, president of the University said in 
addressing the Maryland Press Association. 
In turn, there must be generated in 
foreign countries a greater understanding 
of the American people, their ideals and 
what they stand for, 
Dr. Byrd went on to 
say. 

"We must under- 
stand ourselves well 
enough to sell our- 
selves to other peoples 
and understand other 
peoples so they will 
understand us," he 
emphasized. 

As an example, he 
referred to a talk he 
had with the chief of 
staff of the Italian 
Army. Dr. Byrd asked 
him what, in his opin- 
ion, constituted our greatest mistake in 
the premise of mutual understanding. The 
officer replied, "You Americans want all 
others to be like you. We don't want to 
be." 

President Byrd said he gained his im- 
pressions from inspection trips made in 
two successive years at the branches of 
the University of Maryland operated 
abroad. 

Pay for Themselves 

"These 83 centers of education are not 
costing the University or the State a single 
penny," Dr. Byrd said explaining that the 
courses are paying for themselves. 

During World War II, Dr. Byrd stated 
he realized there were many students in 
the Army who would remain in the service. 
He worked out a program of absentee 
education which drew the attention of the 
Pentagon which later asked that courses 
be established at Boiling and Andrews Air 
Fields. 

The success of these undertakings re- 
sulted in the dispatch of a research team 
to Europe for the purpose of studying the 
possibilities of establishing courses there. 
Initially five centers were agreed upon. 
More than 1,000 students registered in the 
first month of operation. 

Surveys of these European branches of 
the university convinced Dr. Byrd, he said, 
that "we should not give away our shirts, 
but there is a conflict of forces as deadly 
as at any time in the world, one that af- 
fects us all." 

He said opposing forces are "adroit, 
clever and scheming to attain their ends." 
He told of going into a department store 



in the Russian sector of Berlin; a store 
operated by the Soviets. 

Across the street was a small jewelry 
shop. The Russians cut off his supply of 
merchandise. When he resorted to watch 
repairing, they halted delivery of parts. 

The same thing could happen to news- 
papers in this country under Soviet con- 
trol, Dr. Byrd said. The Soviet Govern- 
ment could set up a competing newspaper 
across the street, but it would control all 
advertising and eventually the independent 
newspaper would have to go out of busi- 
ness.